Help Me Help A Friend

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Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I went through training with a man I became good friends with. Frankly, he was the top student in our class that started out with 12 students but graduated only 4. We’ve kept in touch but he’s really struggling with his pay. He has a family and he hasn’t made what he was told to expect so he’s having a hard time supporting his family.

I just talked to him tonight. He had no accidents and a top rating on the company metrics. He is doing much better than me, yet I’ve received a pay raise and he hasn’t. He’s been driving solo on a regional account since January but is thinking about jumping ship to another company. Any ideas on how I can encourage him?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

If he's driving for Schneider, I became friends with two guys during orientation that is having similar experiences driving regional. Not entirely sure if it's their fault or something else since my experience is completely different.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Unless the regional position is giving you a guaranteed salary if you meet the "quota"? You're gonna make squat. Even meeting the quota can be a problem. You're not likely to get enough miles to make it worthwhile earning whatever cents per mile.

You've read plenty on here to guide him. But remember it's his choice to make. Don't want to give someone advise that ends up aggravating the situation & you'll be the scapegoat at the end.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Unless the regional position is giving you a guaranteed salary if you meet the "quota"? You're gonna make squat. Even meeting the quota can be a problem. You're not likely to get enough miles to make it worthwhile earning whatever cents per mile.

I cannot understand what you guys are talking about. Regional jobs can really be great. What is the problem you guys have with them? Understanding how to be productive is always key to your success out here. We've got another thread going where people are whining about not making enough money because they're stuck in the Northeast. I make way more money than the "average" driver, and I spend most of my time in the Northeast!

The key to making money in trucking has very little to do with your job, your company, or your area. You've got to figure out how to be above average - you've got to be productive. You can't lay the blame for below average performance on anybody else - you are in charge of your productivity, not your dispatcher , not your company. I wish I had more time to deal with this subject, but I've got to get on the road. Hopefully some of you will respond and I can jump back in here later.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Splitter's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Unless the regional position is giving you a guaranteed salary if you meet the "quota"? You're gonna make squat. Even meeting the quota can be a problem. You're not likely to get enough miles to make it worthwhile earning whatever cents per mile.

double-quotes-end.png

I cannot understand what you guys are talking about. Regional jobs can really be great. What is the problem you guys have with them? Understanding how to be productive is always key to your success out here. We've got another thread going where people are whining about not making enough money because they're stuck in the Northeast. I make way more money than the "average" driver, and I spend most of my time in the Northeast!

The key to making money in trucking has very little to do with your job, your company, or your area. You've got to figure out how to be above average - you've got to be productive. You can't lay the blame for below average performance on anybody else - you are in charge of your productivity, not your dispatcher , not your company. I wish I had more time to deal with this subject, but I've got to get on the road. Hopefully some of you will respond and I can jump back in here later.

Old School, I'm specifically referring to Prime's SE regional & what I was told by my FM. If you're a L/O or O/O & you get high paying loads then you can do great. As a company driver, you're just not going to get enough miles to make the kind of money we make OTR.

Also, being a seasoned pro like yourself will allow one certain insights & privilege that a solid relationship with a FM brings & avoiding delays that I'm still learning to avoid. A shipper or receiver that you interact with regularly is more accommodating than ones you see once, maybe twice your whole life out here.

That said, Knight's sliding scale pay structure helps when getting lots of shorties. Maybe Knight has many more accounts in certain areas than Prime. We just lost a huge account in the SE. Maybe that's why Prime suspended hiring in CA, GA & FL.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Totally concur with Old School’s reply.

I love this quote from Bruce...

Frankly, he was the top student in our class that started out with 12 students but graduated only 4.

...because it has no relevance. “Frankly” his top ranking enabled him to get a CDL , exact same one as you have. Same value, it’s a ticket to the show...that’s all it is.

Like Old School, Jeremy and probably a few others, I thrive in the NorthEast. I am always busy because there is an incredible amount of commerce transacted in this geography. It’s there for the taking...

A professional driver learns to play the hand they are dealt and perform. Your friend has very little experience and like so many hold the company responsible for their performance. Way more to this job than driving Bruce...you’ve only experienced the tip of the iceberg.

If you want to really help your friend and he actually wants the help; suggest he join the forum. There are plenty of resources in Trucking Truth he can leverage to eventually Become a Top Tier Driver.

Bruce there is a ton of information relevant to this very subject in the blog section of Trucking Truth. The link I provided is just one such article that should be required reading for every rookie driver. Once a driver has the CDL and is solo, that’s when the real learning begins. And it will never end.

Encourage your friend to join. It will do him a world of good.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Truth Bomb INCOMING!!!!

The key to making money in trucking has very little to do with your job, your company, or your area. You've got to figure out how to be above average - you've got to be productive. You can't lay the blame for below average performance on anybody else - you are in charge of your productivity, not your dispatcher , not your company. I wish I had more time to deal with this subject, but I've got to get on the road. Hopefully some of you will respond and I can jump back in here later.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jrod's Comment
member avatar

Is Old School a LeaseOp Driver? or O/O now?

Maybe I missed something, but I was pretty sure he's a company driver...

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Unless the regional position is giving you a guaranteed salary if you meet the "quota"? You're gonna make squat. Even meeting the quota can be a problem. You're not likely to get enough miles to make it worthwhile earning whatever cents per mile.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Old School, I'm specifically referring to Prime's SE regional & what I was told by my FM. If you're a L/O or O/O & you get high paying loads then you can do great. As a company driver, you're just not going to get enough miles to make the kind of money we make OTR.

Also, being a seasoned pro like yourself will allow one certain insights & privilege that a solid relationship with a FM brings & avoiding delays that I'm still learning to avoid. A shipper or receiver that you interact with regularly is more accommodating than ones you see once, maybe twice your whole life out here.

That said, Knight's sliding scale pay structure helps when getting lots of shorties. Maybe Knight has many more accounts in certain areas than Prime. We just lost a huge account in the SE. Maybe that's why Prime suspended hiring in CA, GA & FL.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Is Old School a LeaseOp Driver? or O/O now?

No, he's not an owner operator or lease driver.

Splitter was just trying to explain his theories about why a regional driver can't make a lot of money. Of course G-Town stays within a very small region of the country, and he's in the Northeast and makes about as much as any driver you'll find anywhere. Old School runs the Northeast all the time and makes a killing. We have drivers getting home every night running LTL that probably make more than anyone out there, period. And, in fact, the most money I ever made driving a truck was with a regional job on the Dollar Tree account for US Xpress where I was home every single weekend without fail and spent all of my time in the Northeast.

This industry is full of theories about who makes money, and who doesn't, but none of them hold water. You can make a killing in any type of job if you're a top tier driver and it helps tremendously if you stick with the same company for several years. If you're not a top tier driver or you're job hopping you're not going to make nearly as much money, but you'll have plenty of free time to come up with excuses why others are doing so well and you're not.

In the end it always comes down to driver performance. Only the top performing drivers seem to believe this, though.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jrod asked:

Is Old School a LeaseOp Driver? or O/O now?

Maybe I missed something, but I was pretty sure he's a company driver...

rofl-1.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-2.gif

With zero hesitation...

he** no!

OS is a Knight Transportation Company flatbed driver dedicated to Sapa.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

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