Am I Crazy To Quit $58k Per Year Job To Become A Trucker?

Topic 25285 | Page 3

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Thank you everyone for the replies and advice. I’m seeing first year pay ranging from $45k up to $90k. I still want to be a trucker even if I end up being on the low end of the range at first. For now I will be studying for the learners permit and reading all the good stuff on this site. When I get ready to pick a company/school I will check back in for more advice.

Good stuff Ricky! Along with the High Road training, read up on Daniel B.'s pretrip pdf. It has visual aids & will help identify what the permit questions are referring to.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

You will be nowhere near $90k. No one is. You should be around $45,000 - $50,000. Here is some good information about truck driver pay

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Brett wrote:

You will be nowhere near $90k. No one is. You should be around $45,000 - $50,000. Here is some good information about truck driver pay

Ricky, no one makes 90k their first year. Not sure where you read that, but it sure wasn’t here.

Brett is absolutely right. 90k is at the very tip-top of potential income and something most drivers will never get close to.

There is a lot of good information on first year pay found in the Trucking Truth forum and blog. This article link addresses the reasons why first year pay is substantially lower...

Surviving Your First 6 Months of Trucking

The above article and some of the links within it, will help to ground your expectations.

Good luck.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

On previous page, Solo claimed....

I quit a 90k/yr job to become an OTR driver.

I'm on track to make just shy of that my first year.

So would I quit a 58k/yr job to do what I'm doing? Without hesitation.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

On previous page, Solo claimed....

double-quotes-start.png

I quit a 90k/yr job to become an OTR driver.

I'm on track to make just shy of that my first year.

So would I quit a 58k/yr job to do what I'm doing? Without hesitation.

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks Rob...didn’t see that. Solo has a very short time out here.

I’ll leave it at that...

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Solo posts show a very hard driven young man:

Sleep:

Sun: 2h 21min Mon: 3h 52min Tue: 4h 14min Wed: 2h 5min Thur: 1h 54min (first time trying to sleep in a moving truck during my 10) Fri: 2h 57min

Miles drove: 3391 (was dispatched for my first load last Wed night for this past Monday morning delivery)

Total out-of-route miles: 31 (or 4%)

Total Rev to the truck: $6632.70

Apparently, these numbers are not what TMC sees for first week rookies, and in fact...I received a call from a West area VP yesterday morning that advised me that these aren't numbers they see from the first week through week 4 rookies. That whatever my trainer and I figured out, I need to keep doing it.

33% pay

1st out of 40 drivers under my Fleet Manager 2nd out of 328 drivers under my Safety Mgr 13th out of 1398 drivers in my Divison (presumably that means linehaul) 19th out of 2189 drivers in the Fleet

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Solo posts show a very hard driven young man:

Sleep:

double-quotes-start.png

Sun: 2h 21min Mon: 3h 52min Tue: 4h 14min Wed: 2h 5min Thur: 1h 54min (first time trying to sleep in a moving truck during my 10) Fri: 2h 57min

double-quotes-end.png
double-quotes-start.png

Miles drove: 3391 (was dispatched for my first load last Wed night for this past Monday morning delivery)

Total out-of-route miles: 31 (or 4%)

Total Rev to the truck: $6632.70

Apparently, these numbers are not what TMC sees for first week rookies, and in fact...I received a call from a West area VP yesterday morning that advised me that these aren't numbers they see from the first week through week 4 rookies. That whatever my trainer and I figured out, I need to keep doing it.

double-quotes-end.png
double-quotes-start.png

33% pay

1st out of 40 drivers under my Fleet Manager 2nd out of 328 drivers under my Safety Mgr 13th out of 1398 drivers in my Divison (presumably that means linehaul) 19th out of 2189 drivers in the Fleet

double-quotes-end.png

No argument he is off to a great start. Please read this thread and the reply Old School made to Solo found on page 2...

Maverick vs TMC

Reality check.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
Reality check.

Exactly: just because the planets aligned for a hard driven rookie driver, doesn't create a reasonable expectation.

I'm planning for the lower end: $45,000. If I make $60,000 I would be happier than pigs in ***t.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Reality check.

double-quotes-end.png

Exactly: just because the planets aligned for a hard driven rookie driver, doesn't create a reasonable expectation.

I'm planning for the lower end: $45,000. If I make $60,000 I would be happier than pigs in ***t.

That’s a most realistic expectation for year one.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I quit a 90k/yr job to become an OTR driver.

I'm on track to make just shy of that my first year.

That's total BS. Good grief.

I'll say one thing for ya - you're only a rookie but you're already telling lies like a veteran. You must be a blast in the trucker's lounge.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 3 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More