Fifth Wheel Release Tool

Topic 25336 | Page 2

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
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A lot of our drivers have this.

They are made by one of our drivers, all the drivers that bought them love since it is a hammer as well it cuts down on what you need to carry.

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thanks for the link... totally grabbing one of these

Your welcome, I have not bought one yet as he was out of OD green. But they seem really well made, he and his daughter build them.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
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I don't know how many of you guys know anything about farming but I've seen drivers use "Hay hooks"... I have a lot of trouble posting pictures on here but just Google it. Some places can get them as cheap as $4. If you Google it you will see that it's the kind of tool/weapon I think rainy would love to have....

Junkyard Dog's Comment
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Stevo Reno's Comment
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And doubles as a "Legal"protection device dancing.gif

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
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Our release handles are to far under the trailer to be reached without getting full of grease and risking injury. After I bought one I found out we can sometimes get them for free at our shop. They are sold at every truck stops and come in different lengths. When it's jammed a few quick tugs usually releases the Jaws. For extra support put one foot on the rim of the drive wheel and the other behind you. This will give you leverage and prevent falling.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
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And doubles as a "Legal"protection device dancing.gif

That's why I thought it would be perfect for rainy... And I'll bet she has some ideas how she could use it in her dungeon also...

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

G-Town's Comment
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Which brings up a question. A few times my release handle won’t pull out. I have to get back in the truck and do the back and forth thing until it frees up. Why does that happen?

You must relieve the pressure on the KingPin lock of the fifth wheel. Especially evident when the trailer is loaded and heavy.

Set your trailer brakes and gently reverse the tractor against (pushing) the KingPin, relieving the backward (pulling) pressure. Then set the tractor brakes. All the pressure is now off the KingPin lock and it should release.

If you are still having problems after doing this, have your shop look at it.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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G-Town, that makes sense . Next time it happens I’ll do what you suggested. Fortunately it’s not very often.

I remember the first time it happened to me. I thought it was the end of the world. Typical rookie reaction any time something goes wrong for the first time.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Which brings up a question. A few times my release handle won’t pull out. I have to get back in the truck and do the back and forth thing until it frees up. Why does that happen?

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You must relieve the pressure on the KingPin lock of the fifth wheel. Especially evident when the trailer is loaded and heavy.

Set your trailer brakes and gently reverse the tractor against (pushing) the KingPin, relieving the backward (pulling) pressure. Then set the tractor brakes. All the pressure is now off the KingPin lock and it should release.

If you are still having problems after doing this, have your shop look at it.

I usually hear a click when mine releases

I try to put pressure on mine when I park so no one can pull my release, but I usually forget unfortunately

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

I've never needed one. I do exactly as G-Town suggested above. I do the opposite of that, locking the trailer brake, and pulling against it then setting the tractor brake when I leave the truck so nobody can unhook me. I still check it when I get back to the truck.

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