What Questions Should I Ask Private Truck Driving Schools?

Topic 25417 | Page 1

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Alondra B.'s Comment
member avatar

I am going to a private truck driving school. Roadmaster and what are some of the questions I should ask them? And should I get my permit before entering?

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

First off - PLEASE put the subject of your post in the SUBJECT LINE, so people can figure out what information you are looking for.

Secondly - we pretty much ALWAYS RECOMMEND taking the route of COMPANY TRAINING, as you are not buying a CDL , as training for a career.

I'm sure others will post links for some better directions on how to go about choosing and applying to companies.

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Rick said

Secondly - we pretty much ALWAYS RECOMMEND taking the route of COMPANY TRAINING, as you are not buying a CDL , as training for a career.

Rick is absolutely correct. Most of us believe Paid CDL Training Programs is the best route because you're guaranteed a job upon obtaining your class a CDL.

The only benefit to going the private school route is some companies hire new drivers but offer tuition reimbursement rather than their own school. When I looked at roadmaster it was like $8000 at Tampa location. I did the math at the time (4 years ago) and I would need to work for that company like 3 years before I'd be fully reimbursed.

Each company does things a little differently, but with most complete a year with them and you owe nothing. We have quite a few people who have gone through Primes program and have a ton of diaries in the other section of the forum. We also have members who went through other programs such as crst, cfi ,swift, roehl and many others. Members who have gone through those would be more than happy to give you more information or link specific diaries.

Often times the private schools only care about taking your money. They don't guarantee a job upon completion. We've seen people that spent the money on private schooling then they find out they can't get hired anywhere. Whether its DUI'S, traffic citations, failed drug tests or even a certain medication they're on, the school gladly took their money. Once enough time has passed for speeding tickets to not be as big of a deal you'll possibly have a "stale " cdl and need to go through more training. I'm not saying any of these apply to you just throwing info out there. There are a ton of prescription medications that aren't allowed by the dot , and companies are even more strict. Dont worry about the idea of being locked into a contract deter you, its always best to stay with your first company atleast a year and many more doors will open. Even if you were to leave before your contract is up, most sponsored training is cheaper than private school (with the exception of community colleges).

Anyways, to answer your question I would ask how much seat time you should expect. Nobody ever feels they get enough practice in school but watching other students really helps you see it from another perspective. I would ask the school about the permit. I think having the permit is mandatory for roadmaster but even if it isn't it wouldnt hurt anything to get it on your own. Have they gone over their financing options with you yet?

Please keep us updated on your progress regardless of which route you take. We just ask you put a title to the post so those who can add valuable information can easily see it. We have an incredible group of drivers here that takes time out of their downtime to assist new/prospective drivers while still earning top wages by maximizing their clock. many times they dont have enough time to read all the posts so they try to prioritize their time and a title would help them.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Roadmasters here in Calif is $7,000 NO permit or DOT medical required prior to school, it's all done there (included in price). Werner Enterprises, owns Roadmasters (bought em few years ago) (I am all signed up w/ RM's, but on "hold" due to budget shortage @ WIOA program here..... But I'm considering to just go with CRST, which has already accepted me) Just have few cars am working on at home to finish up first lol

WIOA:

WIOA - Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (aka WIA)

Formerly known as the Workforce Investment Act (WIA), the WIOA was established in 1998 to prepare youth, adults and dislocated workers for entry and reentry into the workforce. WIOA training funds are designed to serve laid-off individuals, older youth and adults who are in need of training to enter or reenter the labor market. A lot of truck drivers get funding for their CDL training through WIOA.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

As long as you understand Crest is team only, they run an excellent CDL school.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

First off - PLEASE put the subject of your post in the SUBJECT LINE, so people can figure out what information you are looking for.

Secondly - we pretty much ALWAYS RECOMMEND taking the route of COMPANY TRAINING, as you are not buying a CDL , as training for a career.

I'm sure others will post links for some better directions on how to go about choosing and applying to companies.

Rick

Both of these for sure. 😜

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Yep Susan, I do , oh well I can handle it....Might just turn out to be an ok company to stay with too, will see how teaming works I guess. ..... Been thinking is perhaps an extra set of eyes can be a help, especially just starting out. And depending, if you get a co-driver who wants to Drive & WORK!

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
And depending, if you get a co-driver who wants to Drive & WORK!

That right there is the crap shoot!

good-luck.gif

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Been thinking is perhaps an extra set of eyes can be a help, especially just starting out. And depending, if you get a co-driver who wants to Drive & WORK!

I love the optimism!

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Please don't expect your co-driver to be that extra set of eyes. They'll likely be sleeping and on their 10 hour break when it's your shift, and vise versa. Would you want to be interrupted when dead asleep on your break?

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