CR England Trucks With Three Bunks

Topic 25459 | Page 1

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Zachary P.'s Comment
member avatar

Editor's Note: What you're about to hear is the typical garbage that people spew when they think they know more than they do about the trucking industry. This person is not a driver, but somehow he thinks he knows how drivers should be trained. Imagine that.

I originally was going to start at CR England and they just fed a bunch of crap to me. So I didn't feel safe and the way they do their training is just not safe . I cannot bring myself to agree with it.

I am looking for information on Maverick Transport paid CDL training and Werner's training program and how long you spend training before you have to go on your own . Any help is welcome and appreciated

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Maverick-there are actually a couple training diaries for this company within the first half dozen pages of that section, plus their recruiters can answer these questions.

Last I knew (things change) it was a week of orientation, four weeks of cdl school, week of securement, then minimum five weeks with trainer. There are some differences in this schedule depending on previous experience, if you already have your cdl, or which division you are going with. Call their recruiter for current training schedules and waiting list times.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Ok thank you. I originally was going to start at Cr England and they just fed a bunch of crap to me. So I didn't feel safe and the way they do their training is just not safe . I cannot bring myself to agree with it.

double-quotes-start.png

Maverick-there are actually a couple training diaries for this company within the first half dozen pages of that section, plus their recruiters can answer these questions.

Last I knew (things change) it was a week of orientation, four weeks of cdl school, week of securement, then minimum five weeks with trainer. There are some differences in this schedule depending on previous experience, if you already have your cdl, or which division you are going with. Call their recruiter for current training schedules and waiting list times.

double-quotes-end.png

Based on what? How did you conclude this observation as a perspective student?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It might have something to do with their new 3 bunk trucks at CR England. 1 trainer, 2 trainees.

Spaceman Spiff's Comment
member avatar

Susan, do you know anymore about that? I heard rumors but it seems just straight unsafe to try to cram that third bunk in there, much less expect everyone to get along.

Zachary P.'s Comment
member avatar

From employees and I have seen the 3 bunk trucks they are real. The put you with a trainer for 2 and a half weeks . Then they team you up with another driver that has only had 2 and a half weeks . My mother works for prime and I'm trying to see about going there.

double-quotes-start.png

Ok thank you. I originally was going to start at Cr England and they just fed a bunch of crap to me. So I didn't feel safe and the way they do their training is just not safe . I cannot bring myself to agree with it.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Maverick-there are actually a couple training diaries for this company within the first half dozen pages of that section, plus their recruiters can answer these questions.

Last I knew (things change) it was a week of orientation, four weeks of cdl school, week of securement, then minimum five weeks with trainer. There are some differences in this schedule depending on previous experience, if you already have your cdl, or which division you are going with. Call their recruiter for current training schedules and waiting list times.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Based on what? How did you conclude this observation as a perspective student?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Three bunks and three people in one truck? Sounds like the plot to a prison riot movie. Sometimes it's too much to even have myself in the truck alone. Many have been the times I almost kicked myself out.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Ok, a couple of things. First, here is a video showing the 3 bunk trucks that CR England has

Now, a thought about CR England's Training Program and trucking in general. Anyone who's been around here for a while knows that one thing I can't stand is a crybaby. I've deleted a few comments already from people doing the same old complain, blame, and criticize thing and I'm just not going to have it here. If you guys are too damn soft to suck it up and endure a little inconvenience during your initial training phase then go back to living in your mom's basement.

Trucking is full of crybabies, most of which don't last a month. In fact, the overwhelming majority of new drivers don't have what it takes to make it in this industry. If you want to thrive in trucking you had better be able to tolerate a wide range of circumstances and you'd better be able to accept the endless stream of challenges you're going to face.

Trucking is an adventure and one hell of a challenge. It's going to test you in every way. You'd better be able to cowboy up and handle it or you're going to get tossed to the curb like so many others.

When I was 19, two buddies and myself took off from Buffalo in an old 80's Chevy van with about $1,000 between us heading for Atlanta. We didn't know anyone, we didn't have a plan. We lived in the van in a Waffle House parking lot and landed labor jobs through a temp service for $4.00/hr. That is not a typo.

We put in 60+ hours a week while living in that van for almost a month before we could save enough money to get an apartment. Then one of the guys stole money from us and shots were fired outside our apartment so two of us wound up back in the van for a few more weeks until we could get a new place.

It was the adventure of a lifetime. It was a blast. We loved every minute of it.

Trucking was the same way for me. It was the most grand adventure imaginable, which is exactly what I'm looking for.

So if you guys are going to cry baby about a couple of weeks in a brand new rig during training then in my opinion you're just too damn soft to do this job anyhow. You don't want it badly enough and you don't have any sense of adventure.

So please........everyone quit your crybabying. Go to the other trucker's forum or facebook or youtube if you want to complain and criticize. For those of you who want to be successful in trucking we're always thrilled to help out any way we can. We'll gladly answer every question you throw at us.

But the crybabying? Take it elsewhere. This industry is for grown ass adults who are ready to take on big challenges. Those are the types we like around here.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

So........Tell us how ya really feel Brett!

rofl-1.gif

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

So........Tell us how ya really feel Brett!

rofl-1.gif

Man, I'm tellin ya.......back in the day you didn't dare want to be known as a complainer. Nowadays people complain about everything! It drives me insane.

I have pictures of my great grandmother and other women working the farm fields using hand tools with infants strapped to their backs. The first part of the 20th century had the Great Depression, one of the worst droughts in history, two world wars, disease, and poverty. The safety standards were so slack that you risked your life working in factories or construction.

Nowadays if your trainer doesn't call you "sir" or the climate control is two degrees too warm you hire a lawyer, build a class action lawsuit, and blast them on Social Media. I just can't stand it.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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