Using The Runaway Truck Ramp

Topic 25475 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Superlejera's Comment
member avatar

Okay, that sounds good. All of Knight's flatbed work is a dedicated account, but Prime is more like a true flatbed job. Knight usually requires that you live within a certain proximity to their customer, so it's a little tricky getting in on their program. Turtle is a flatbed driver with Prime, along with several other members in here.

Thanks you for the information Iā€™m looking to stay with prime

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

Dont worry about Old School he's a van driver now. I think he likes the dark side.

Matthew W.'s Comment
member avatar

Dont worry about Old School he's a van driver now. I think he likes the dark side.

Yep, pretty soon he'll be on here complaining about sticky tandems not sliding so he can scale out legally.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Sung Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you all...all the info i get from here. It's very helpful... Thanks again all...

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Have any trucks ever over shot a runaway ramp? What material is generally used, sand? gravel?

I did see a runaway ramp out east that seemed pretty short and had almost a vertical drop at the high end. Scary.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Sand, pea gravel, and water are common materials that are used.

Buckaroo B.'s Comment
member avatar

I took the ramp on northbound I-5 near Lebec CA (Grapevine) in 1996. It was pea gravel and I was pulling a 48' double drop flatbed with glass at close to 80K lbs gross. It was 2AM so traffic was light. Hit the ramp at about 60-65 MPH. Rig stopped straight in about 250-300 ft. CHP came out. No ticket. Wrecker cost $600 to pull it back onto the paved drive along side the gravel trap. A broken spot mirror on passenger door was the only damage, and a pair of underwear:). The double drop trailer helped slow rig fast because there was only about 6" of ground clearance. It was plowing gravel as soon as it went in the pit. I had to sweep all the gravel off the frame before taking it back on the road.

Have any trucks ever over shot a runaway ramp? What material is generally used, sand? gravel?

I did see a runaway ramp out east that seemed pretty short and had almost a vertical drop at the high end. Scary.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Buckaroo B has experienced a runaway ramp..,

I took the ramp on northbound I-5 near Lebec CA (Grapevine) in 1996. It was pea gravel and I was pulling a 48' double drop flatbed with glass at close to 80K lbs gross. It was 2AM so traffic was light. Hit the ramp at about 60-65 MPH. Rig stopped straight in about 250-300 ft. CHP came out. No ticket. Wrecker cost $600 to pull it back onto the paved drive along side the gravel trap. A broken spot mirror on passenger door was the only damage, and a pair of underwear:). The double drop trailer helped slow rig fast because there was only about 6" of ground clearance. It was plowing gravel as soon as it went in the pit. I had to sweep all the gravel off the frame before taking it back on the road.

Interesting. Not sure if I recall anyone coming through the forum with this experience. Harrowing.

So help us understand what events lead-up to the bailout? Not an everyday occurrence, almost always caused by a serious issue. Curious how after all that your truck was road worthy. There is many time collateral damage to the undercarriage, brake chambers are especially vulnerable.

Just curious...

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Buckaroo B.'s Comment
member avatar

I was hauling glass from Laredo to San Jose. The glass was large plate glass sheets approx. 30'x10' and about .5-.625" thick. I climbed out of the LA basin and from Santa Clarita until the crest I could only manage 15 MPH. It took me 30-40 minutes to climb it. When I crested the hill I up shifted and tapped the brake just to make sure everything was good.

The pedal felt soft and I looked at air gauges. The pressure was low around 75-80 PSI. I hadn't used the brakes in probably an hour so something was wrong. I immediately pulled onto the shoulder and applied the brakes to stop. Since I had crested the hill and now was on the downhill side I managed to get my speed to 5 MPH but could not get the truck to stop. It was a helpless feeling. I held the pedal instead of pumping so I wouldn't lose anymore pressure but there wasn't enough air pressure to push the shoes against the drums hard enough to stop the truck. I slowly started building speed. I thought about running the truck off in the ditch but wasn't sure if this would work. I let off the brake pedal and pulled back onto I-5.

I had a 3406B Cat and max RPMs was around 1800. With jake brake on full I would let the RPMs climb to 2000-2100 and double clutch and ram the shifter into the next higher gear so I didn't get caught in neutral. This was the only way I could control my speed. I stayed off the brakes because my air pressure was not coming up and I didn't want the parking/emergency brakes to set with no way to release them. Emergency brakes engaged only on two axles was not going to help my situation and could lead to a fire and/or tire failure. I continued down the mountain and got on the CB radio to announce my predicament. I can remember calling out "I'm a northbound runaway please stay out of right lane". It was 2AM so there wasn't much traffic.

By the time I saw the 1st sign for the runaway ramp, about 3 miles down, I was thinking I might be able to make it to the bottom. But, I had lost more air pressure and the emergency brakes had set and were smoking. I was up to 60 MPH and still building speed. I monitored vehicles around me and as I closed in on the ramp I looked around again and there were no vehicles around so I moved into left lane so I could square up with the ramp better. Jackknifing in the ramp was a big concern since the 9700 International cabover only had 144ā€ WB and a set-back steer axle. I drifted across middle and right lanes and straight into the ramp. It was an awful noise. Gravel showered the bottom of the truck and the headache rack. It seemed like a long time but it only lasted about 8-10 seconds. It was a hell of a ride.

Then a giant cloud of dust and brake smoke enveloped the cab. The truck came to rest in a straight line. CHP showed up within 10-15 minutes and a wrecker an hour later. They winched the rig backwards onto the paved access road next to the ramp. It was 4-5 AM by this point. Road service showed up at sunrise. I had lost an outside tire on the rear axle of the trailer and there was a broken airline damaged from the tire blowout. The trailer wheels were not the standard 22.5" or 24.5" size. They were 18.5" as I recall.

The service truck had to send someone to LA area to get the tire. While we waited for the tire, I asked the service guy what cause me to lose brake pressure. He thought the broken airline caused by the blowout of the tire was the reason. I didn't 100% agree with that because I think the tire blew on the way down the mountain, not on the way up. 2PM I was back on the road. Delivered load a day late and deadheaded back to Laredo without any issues. None of the glass was broken but the kicker blocks nailed to the trailer floor were knocked out and the glass shifted forward 4=6ā€. Don't care to go through that again.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I immediately pulled onto the shoulder and applied the brakes to stop. Since I had crested the hill and now was on the downhill side I managed to get my speed to 5 MPH but could not get the truck to stop

Man, you should've pulled the parking brake right there and then, eh? That would've stopped ya.

Glad to hear it ended so well though. Wow. I would've expected the truck to get torn up. I've seen the front axle ripped right off the truck in one of those emergency ramps.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More