I Need Help - Not Getting Enough Miles

Topic 25539 | Page 1

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NeeklODN's Comment
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I need advice on my current situation. Some of y'all have knowledge of some of my struggles with long haul driving and my current employer. Bottom line is, I'm still not getting the miles. Averaging 2000 miles per week since I started. Some good weeks, many bad ones. I'm on a sliding pay scale flatbed. So, 2000 miles per week only pays .37 per mile. I was promised 2400-3000 miles a week.

My previous local employer offered me a $3/hour raise to come back. I'm very tempted at this point to take it because I'm not making more out here. I think I've shown all of the marks of a professional out here. I'm trying my absolute best at all times. I Never waste time. I'm sitting ALOT at the end of my days with several (5 or 6) hours left on my clock every day. I'm regional so I pretty much unload and reload every day. That is ok with me. My opinion is that it boils down to the length of haul. I've asked several times for more miles with this being my most recent attempt:

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It's actually been about 10 weeks but you get the point. I haven't gotten any real response to this message. He said he would talk to his boss and then I heard nothing else. That same day I got rerouted to grab an extra load. It was a grand total of something like 120 miles loaded and empty and had to stay out a day later to get it done. Basically about $45 for a whole lot of work securing and tarping. Then undoing the securement and tarping. And staying out an extra day on top of it. Was this his feeble attempt at "more miles"? Am I being unreasonable? Maybe I am. Honestly I am so frustrated at this point, I can't figure out if I'm asking for too much.

I'm not sure if I should sacrifice my happiness to stick it out. If I were making the money, I could deal with all kinds of crap. There is definitely POTENTIAL, but at the present moment, it is not materializing. Do I stick it out or go back local for $20/hour?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Is there an option for you to not be regional?

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Is there an option for you to not be regional?

Yes I think so but not sure if they want anymore OTR drivers right now. Haven't really explored that. My wife has a hard time as it is though. As far as hometime.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

My opinion is biased due to only having done local work. For me to do OTR or regional I would need to be enjoying the adventure, and/or making substantially more money for the sacrafices that come with being gone so frequently. If you go back to old job how will the money (going off average hours you previously got while there) compare to what you're currently making? If it's been 10 weeks they should have an idea of the driver you are and give you the miles you deserve. If you're happy there perhaps go to dispatchers boss about it. Just let dispatcher know in advance so it doesnt come across as you think he's not capable of doing his job.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

My opinion is biased due to only having done local work. For me to do OTR or regional I would need to be enjoying the adventure, and/or making substantially more money for the sacrafices that come with being gone so frequently. If you go back to old job how will the money (going off average hours you previously got while there) compare to what you're currently making? If it's been 10 weeks they should have an idea of the driver you are and give you the miles you deserve. If you're happy there perhaps go to dispatchers boss about it. Just let dispatcher know in advance so it doesnt come across as you think he's not capable of doing his job.

Well the local gig will be at least forty hours. Sometimes up to 55 with overtime pay. So minimum of $800/week gross.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Believe it or not, long loads are not super essential to get good miles in regional flatbed. I average 3k+ miles a week with a load average under 500 miles. You’ve just got to be unbelievably efficient. That ending every day with several hours left on your clock is worrisome. Are you loaded or empty? Are you waiting for an appointment time?

The key for me is letting my load planner know what I’m doing. Our planners don’t look for a load for us until we pop up on their board on arrival at receiver. However, we have an eta macro that I abuse, letting the planner know my eta so they can look for a load hours or a day in advance. Other drivers are surprised when I have two or more preplans lined up-means no waiting for a load. Also, if you are waiting for an appointment time to roll around, call someone, your fleet manager or the receiver, just to see if you can deliver ahead of schedule. You’d be surprised how often you can get worked in early.

Ten weeks is still fairly young in your relationship with your home office. It was probably almost a year of on time deliveries and running hard before my fleet manager, load planners, and I really got synched.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

Believe it or not, long loads are not super essential to get good miles in regional flatbed. I average 3k+ miles a week with a load average under 500 miles. You’ve just got to be unbelievably efficient. That ending every day with several hours left on your clock is worrisome. Are you loaded or empty? Are you waiting for an appointment time?

The key for me is letting my load planner know what I’m doing. Our planners don’t look for a load for us until we pop up on their board on arrival at receiver. However, we have an eta macro that I abuse, letting the planner know my eta so they can look for a load hours or a day in advance. Other drivers are surprised when I have two or more preplans lined up-means no waiting for a load. Also, if you are waiting for an appointment time to roll around, call someone, your fleet manager or the receiver, just to see if you can deliver ahead of schedule. You’d be surprised how often you can get worked in early.

Ten weeks is still fairly young in your relationship with your home office. It was probably almost a year of on time deliveries and running hard before my fleet manager, load planners, and I really got synched.

When I'm ending my day with several hours left, it's because I've arrived to my receiver/shipper after business hours. Let me ask you this, what IS your average length of haul including MT? We don't do preplans at my company. I always try and deliver early. Typically, I'm at the gates when they open.

Here's an example of my concern, let's say I had a 70 mile MT and 200 loaded every day for 5 days. That's 1350 miles. Let's say instead (staying under your 500 mile length) I get an avg of 100 miles MT and 400 miles loaded every day. That's 2500.

My point is, even with a 70 MT and 250 loaded day, it's rare for me to be able to complete that run in ONE business day. So, low miles but time consuming because it involves the same amount of waiting at shipper and receiver and securement. Receiving is only open for like 8 hours or LESS at some places. Let me be clear though, I'm very fast at securing. I secured and tarped a full load of OSB Friday in 45 minutes.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

NeeklODN, I love what andhe78 says. It just takes time to get synched in with the company so they know how you run and what you're capable of. His "abuse" of the ETA macro is keeping him moving, and he obviously understands that.

I think you know I've followed along with your adventures with some interest. I almost think you and your lady will be happier with you back at your old job. One of the most important things about working any type of job is that you and your family are happy with your circumstances. I think if you can get some decent overtime you could do pretty well over there. Your old boss definitely considers you valuable. Just let him know you want to be able to make more money, and assure him you're willing to do whatever it takes.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

If your dropping off a load and picking a load up everyday and still have time to burn 5 or 6 hours of your clock not including the hours you burn loading and unloading plus you still get 2000 miles a week then there is something wrong. Your running like a local driver making local money in flatbed. Thing is at 2000 miles your driving a lot more than a local flatbed driver. I would stick it out a few more months and I would do my very best and if things didn’t improve I would find another flatbed company. Your saying your grossing about 740 a week. Most flatbed companies are getting rookies a 1000 a week minimum provided there’s no issues with detention or breakdown. Your doing 5 loads and working your gloves off. I hope it gets better for you.

NeeklODN's Comment
member avatar

NeeklODN, I love what andhe78 says. It just takes time to get synched in with the company so they know how you run and what you're capable of. His "abuse" of the ETA macro is keeping him moving, and he obviously understands that.

I think you know I've followed along with your adventures with some interest. I almost think you and your lady will be happier with you back at your old job. One of the most important things about working any type of job is that you and your family are happy with your circumstances. I think if you can get some decent overtime you could do pretty well over there. Your old boss definitely considers you valuable. Just let him know you want to be able to make more money, and assure him you're willing to do whatever it takes.

I hear you man and I appreciate that you're always willing to give advice. I'm Just at a loss because, as I said, there is so much POTENTIAL here. That 3100 mile week felt so good. It's like I'm chasing my next high lol.

The thing with going back local is that it's normally only 40-43 hours. So, the potential is less but it's more consistent. It's almost like playing the stock market at this point. Regional would be the aggressive choice with higher risk/reward, while local would be the conservative lower risk/reward.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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