Accident At Fuel Island

Topic 25688 | Page 3

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∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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Tevin said this about his 'trainer': " He has 10 months of experience and knows things I can learn."

Ten months? What company makes a rookie driver a trainer?????? I'm sticking to my opinion here. I think the trainer did Tevin a huge disservice and should take sole responsibility. It's his JOB to teach and he screwed up his teaching in this instance.

He is NOT a trainer. He is a "lead driver." tevin finished his training.

Tevin is the driver, it is up to HIM to drive safely, regardless what his CO driver says. Period. Tevin recognizes this, and has taken responsibility for his actions. Will you blame your dispatcher , or other person, because you drove against your own better judgment, and had an incident, because the load needs to be there? No. You CHOSE to drive. Just like he did, and neglected to swing wide enough.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
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Well, “Lead Driver” was a driver trainer by a different name when I was at CRST.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Okay, I now understand the difference between trainer and lead driver. Changes things a little bit, but I can picture myself in Tevin's situation. We don't know how intimidating the lead driver was. In any case, he should have kept his mouth shut and let Tevin make his own decision and then the accident wouldn't have happened.

Rob T.'s Comment
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Well, “Lead Driver” was a driver trainer by a different name when I was at CRST.

That's how I've interpreted it with millionmilers posts

PackRat's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

Well, “Lead Driver” was a driver trainer by a different name when I was at CRST.

double-quotes-end.png

That's how I've interpreted it with millionmilers posts

Exactly.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar
I'm a new student with CRST and I passed all of my training. I'm now OTR with my lead driver. We have been on the road for 2 weeks now

I misinterpreted what he wrote. I read the "finished training" and went from there.

It does not matter how it happened, and what preceeded the incident. The person driving is responsible.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

Your "trainer" or whatever he is to be called gave you some real turd advice by telling you " I can't wait for everyone". Terrible advice in my opinion as it pertains to this situation. Anytime I encounter a driver trying to back on it i give the driver ample room, put my hazards on if they werent already, and pop my tractor brakes so he nows im not going to try and squeeze pass him when I see a foot of space. And 9 and a half times out of 10 within a minute he will either be backed in, or he will make eye contact with me and wave me by. That's just me anyway.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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"It does not matter how it happened, and what preceeded the incident. The person driving is responsible."

And the driver, Trevan, is taking responsibility and I really respect that. It's very refreshing when a new driver does that, because we hear from those who won't accept responsibility and no matter how many times they get hit in the head with the reality stick they still deny responsibility to the bitter end. (Any recent examples come to mind?)

However, his co-driver should have kept his mouth shut. Trevin was willing to wait for the path to clear, which was the right decision, always. Then Mr. Co-Driver goads a new driver to move ahead, which was not his responsibility. Only if Trevan was going to do something unsafe would the co-driver be justified in speaking up. But this was not the case because Trevan was going to do the proper thing.

So the argument can go back and forth, but I'm siding with Trevin on this one. Seems like a nice kid with a good attitude.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

Well, “Lead Driver” was a driver trainer by a different name when I was at CRST.

I can confirm this is the same also now. 😜

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

"It does not matter how it happened, and what preceeded the incident. The person driving is responsible."

And the driver, Trevan, is taking responsibility and I really respect that. It's very refreshing when a new driver does that, because we hear from those who won't accept responsibility and no matter how many times they get hit in the head with the reality stick they still deny responsibility to the bitter end. (Any recent examples come to mind?)

However, his co-driver should have kept his mouth shut. Trevin was willing to wait for the path to clear, which was the right decision, always. Then Mr. Co-Driver goads a new driver to move ahead, which was not his responsibility. Only if Trevan was going to do something unsafe would the co-driver be justified in speaking up. But this was not the case because Trevan was going to do the proper thing.

So the argument can go back and forth, but I'm siding with Trevin on this one. Seems like a nice kid with a good attitude.

Yes, the Co driver was a an idiot. He pressured a new driver into a bad situation. But Tevin could have still said No. He didn't. He owned his mistake, and learned from it. If it were a DAC"able offense or ticketable, Tevin would be the one receiving it, not the co-driver.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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