Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

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Kevin 's Comment
member avatar

Jeez why all the bashing, I was simply stating it could be better for The OP due to his concerns. Never said rookie drivers get the best offers as well. Simply stated I can choose where I want to and I have no worries. Didn’t know that would be an issue my bad 🤷‍♂️

Also my friend simply found something local he could take and be home everyday after his 6 months of time to have more time with his kids. Like I also said, he likes working for Roehl and does not have any issues with the company.....

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I have a friend working for Roehl and he wishes he would went to a school like I did. He likes working for Roehl don’t get me wrong but he has come across better offers at other companies and he is stuck cause he hasn’t finished his contract and doesn’t want to pay the 7k.

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Kevin, just so you know... we all recognize this as bogus. Rookie drivers with zero experience don't get great offers from other companies. Your "friend" doesn't know a good thing when it's staring him in the face.

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If you are able to I would get your training from the community college( I did).

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So I guess you're a "free agent" now. I'm guessing all the highest paying trucking jobs are courting and wooing you in now that you have a CDL and no experience. It must be great! They're probably lighting your cigars, offering you fancy cars and beautiful women.

Man, it must be great being in your shoes! You are in demand and calling the shots aren't ya?

Busting The Free Agent Myth

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Jeez why all the bashing, I was simply stating it could be better for The OP due to his concerns. Never said rookie drivers get the best offers as well. Simply stated I can choose where I want to and I have no worries. Didn’t know that would be an issue my bad

We're not bashing you. We're maybe going to a little extreme to point out your error. This isn't a place where we all just offer random opinions. There's a solid reason we included the word "truth" in the website's name. We try really hard to help folks make a great start at this career.

Here's the truth... There's no free lunch. You paid for your training. That's great, but it didn't give you any more options than a newbie going to a Paid CDL Training Program. I realize you think you had choices, but so does the person who chooses which paid program to start with. The only difference is you are out the money with no real advantage to show for it.

I get it. I went to a private school myself, but to think it's advantageous is simply to misunderstood the whole process.

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Kevin said: "I just researched my options, I was able to financially go to a technical school over company paid "

That does not make any sense. The 'financially' better choice is to go into PAID training with a solid company. Your experience may be the rare exception, but for anyone else looking to get into a driving position, signing on with a 'start to finish' company is the best way to a successful career.

Kevin 's Comment
member avatar

I can appreciate this response. I didn’t know we could not post opinions here, noted. I understand your points and Bruce’s as well. I agree that it may not be financially smarter to go to a non company paid training program but it did offer me more choices. If I start with a company and after 6 months I want to move on to further advance myself I now have that option, If I moved and the company does not have hiring lanes there, I can move without having to pay X amount of dollars back. These were the variables I was considering when choosing this career. Don’t get me wrong I don’t plan on jumping from company to company, I worked over 20 years for the same company in my last career.

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Jeez why all the bashing, I was simply stating it could be better for The OP due to his concerns. Never said rookie drivers get the best offers as well. Simply stated I can choose where I want to and I have no worries. Didn’t know that would be an issue my bad

double-quotes-end.png

We're not bashing you. We're maybe going to a little extreme to point out your error. This isn't a place where we all just offer random opinions. There's a solid reason we included the word "truth" in the website's name. We try really hard to help folks make a great start at this career.

Here's the truth... There's no free lunch. You paid for your training. That's great, but it didn't give you any more options than a newbie going to a Paid CDL Training Program. I realize you think you had choices, but so does the person who chooses which paid program to start with. The only difference is you are out the money with no real advantage to show for it.

I get it. I went to a private school myself, but to think it's advantageous is simply to misunderstood the whole process.

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Here's a great podcast to listen to on this subject also: Episode 18: Stop The Fear And Doubt, Focus On Your Own Success.

If I start with a company and after 6 months I want to move on to further advance myself I now have that option

So the thinking is you'll pay the money up front to go to school so you can choose a company to work for. But apparently you're not too confident about how to choose a company because you also want the option of leaving only half way through your rookie year so you can get ahead by starting over at the bottom somewhere else.

You don't get ahead by jumping ship 6 months into your rookie year. You get ahead by staying with your first company a minimum of one year, developing strong relationships within the company, learning how the company operates on the inside, and proving yourself to be a very hard working and reliable driver. That's when you'll start turning big miles consistently, getting raises, access to the company's best customers, better equipment, and opportunities in special divisions reserved for the best drivers.

Episode 4: Why Stick With Your First Company One Full Year?

If I moved and the company does not have hiring lanes there, I can move without having to pay X amount of dollars back

You apparently didn't know what state you might be living in 6 months from now?

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Kevin, we respect your right to make your own decisions and choices. There are exceptions to the advice promoted here. But they are very rarely the right decisions or exceptions.

Many newbies looking into getting a driving career, worry about a one year contract with the training company. As I have learned from my experience, the best choice is to pick a company with paid training and stick to it for a year. You need that year to gain experience and learn what driving is all about.

Kevin 's Comment
member avatar

Never said I would be jumping ship in 6 months..... I have been a lurker on here and read a lot of info if not all of it. I even used some of the pre tests to pass all my endorsements. As far as moving goes not necessarily but it was on the table for my family a few months ago to possibly move to another state. I just wanted all my options available to me so again I did what was necessary for “myself” is all. It all worked out for me in the end so I was just trying to share my experience with the OP. I’m not trying to debate which is better or saying which is better or even argue. In the end you get what you need a CDL license. One of the main reasons I did it through the technical school is I was having a hard time finding a “good company” that trained on a manual transmission as I did not want any restrictions In the end I wish the OP the best of luck and just do your research and what’s best for you. Roehl is a great company to start with, I’ve been told they have some great training.

Here's a great podcast to listen to on this subject also: Episode 18: Stop The Fear And Doubt, Focus On Your Own Success.

double-quotes-start.png

If I start with a company and after 6 months I want to move on to further advance myself I now have that option

double-quotes-end.png

So the thinking is you'll pay the money up front to go to school so you can choose a company to work for. But apparently you're not too confident about how to choose a company because you also want the option of leaving only half way through your rookie year so you can get ahead by starting over at the bottom somewhere else.

You don't get ahead by jumping ship 6 months into your rookie year. You get ahead by staying with your first company a minimum of one year, developing strong relationships within the company, learning how the company operates on the inside, and proving yourself to be a very hard working and reliable driver. That's when you'll start turning big miles consistently, getting raises, access to the company's best customers, better equipment, and opportunities in special divisions reserved for the best drivers.

Episode 4: Why Stick With Your First Company One Full Year?

double-quotes-start.png

If I moved and the company does not have hiring lanes there, I can move without having to pay X amount of dollars back

double-quotes-end.png

You apparently didn't know what state you might be living in 6 months from now?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tim 's Comment
member avatar

Trucker's Forum The friendliest, most helpful one on one advice you'll find anywhere. Our experienced drivers will answer every question you have with honesty and a genuine desire to help you succeed in trucking. No company bashing, no arguing, no disrespect. Just good ol' fashioned friendly advice.

Is this still in effect? Seems that Kevin got slammed pretty hard for offering an opinion that is different from the general consensus of the group. I am sure that I will get beat up by offering this observation, but at some point you have to be able to offer a differing opinion.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Tim wrote:

Trucker's Forum The friendliest, most helpful one on one advice you'll find anywhere. Our experienced drivers will answer every question you have with honesty and a genuine desire to help you succeed in trucking. No company bashing, no arguing, no disrespect. Just good ol' fashioned friendly advice.

Is this still in effect? Seems that Kevin got slammed pretty hard for offering an opinion that is different from the general consensus of the group. I am sure that I will get beat up by offering this observation, but at some point you have to be able to offer a differing opinion.

Tim...Kevin was not slammed. In reference to your unfounded concern; yes the mission of Trucking Truth is still in effect. So please answer a few questions for us...

Were the replies to Kevin truthful, honest and based on experience?

Were they disrespectful?

Were the replies unfriendly?

Was their a genuine desire to help identify the best path to success?

We are here to help, by offering actual real world experience and not beat-people-up. Opinions are fine, if offered as firsthand, proven experience and not just a contrarian point of view. We have seen countless examples of private schools basically ripping students off and not delivering on their promises. Although Kevin’s choices may have worked for him, more times than not, the results are not favorable.

If you really want the truth and not a sugar-coated, watered down version, I suggest sticking with Trucking Truth and trusting the mindshare of this forum. We will NOT steer anyone wrong.

Tim 's Comment
member avatar

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I have a friend working for Roehl and he wishes he would went to a school like I did. He likes working for Roehl don’t get me wrong but he has come across better offers at other companies and he is stuck cause he hasn’t finished his contract and doesn’t want to pay the 7k.

double-quotes-end.png

Kevin, just so you know... we all recognize this as bogus. Rookie drivers with zero experience don't get great offers from other companies. Your "friend" doesn't know a good thing when it's staring him in the face.

double-quotes-start.png

If you are able to I would get your training from the community college( I did).

double-quotes-end.png

So I guess you're a "free agent" now. I'm guessing all the highest paying trucking jobs are courting and wooing you in now that you have a CDL and no experience. It must be great! They're probably lighting your cigars, offering you fancy cars and beautiful women.

Man, it must be great being in your shoes! You are in demand and calling the shots aren't ya?

Busting The Free Agent Myth

G-Town, This is one example of what I was referring to. It seems that if someone offers an opinion contrary to the "norm" they are belittled or bashed. Anthony H2O is another example in his recent post regarding the Upgrade Freeze at Prime in a different post. Based upon his response, I would have to bet money that he certainly felt like he was being bashed or belittled. Overall, I think that this a great forum. I read most everything and I rarely post. I have past experience (~3 1/2 years OTR) from quite a while ago and am considering getting back into driving. This forum provides a lot of insight to the vast differences from when I was driving to now and I have learned a lot. All I'm saying is that there are times that some of the feedback is not conducive to making people feel comfortable about asking a question or offering their opinion.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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