Does Roehl Charge Tuition If You Fail Your CDL Exam?

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G-Town's Comment
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Sorry Tim your idea of being belittled or bashed is totally opposite of mine (ours).

Rob T.'s Comment
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So we're not allowed to call BS if somebody is spreading bad information? People considering a career will look at that post and think "all i need is 6 months and I'll have a ton of companies wanting to hire me". They will enter this profession with the wrong ideas and zero commitment. Anthony got his answer in that thread, and that question has been asked nearly weekly by students upgrading. It's always met with the same answer of it being a rumor, most people have a truck within a couple days.

I see nothing belittling anybody. If you guys can't handle somebody giving you the answer you wanted or have a discussion of why they disagree then go back to your safe place in mom's basement and stay off the internet. See, now THAT is belittling. I apologize (truthfully) if I offend you but so many people are coming on here and getting offended because a moderator tells them they're ideas are flawed. I went against the moderators and experienced drivers advice here and started doing local food service work, arguably one of the most difficult ways to enter this industry. I wasnt belittled or criticized for my choice. They did however help make sure I fully understood the difficulties I'd have.

Rick S.'s Comment
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Sorry Tim your idea of being belittled or bashed is totally opposite of mine (ours).

Fine line between some people being "overly sensitive", and responders being (perceived as) "overly harsh".

There's a tendency in todays american culture, of being REAL THIN SKINNED to any perception of criticism. These people tend to go all passive/aggressive and cry victimization.

Anyone seeking advice/counsel/suggestions on this board is assumed to be an "adult" (might be reaching in a few cases though), and can take a direct and concise response to a query, without it having to be in politically correct verbiage.

OTOH - long time contributors to this site, have seen and heard it all pretty much - and oftentimes grow inpatient with people who have ZERO EXPERIENCE in the industry that come here seeking advice, don't like the answer they get - and want to debate the subject INTO THE GROUND (amny of which threads I just STAY OFF OF). We're not here to "sugarcoat" things.

GROW A PAIR PEOPLE. We're all assumed to be ADULTS here, in a trade which REQUIRES AN ADULT ATTITUDE AND DECISION MAKING SKILLS (as well as at least basic communications skills).

Some discussions go on for pages and pages, and sometimes just go "off the rails". Where the time and resources of the experienced advisors here, are SQUANDERED answering redundantly with EXPERIENCED BASED FACTS. I can see how some of them (myself included) can begin to get frustrated.

You want to see a "feces show", where little actually gets done except for arguing and debating? Try TR of some of the other forums out there.

As for the original topic. It's a shame that someone who just isn't cut out for driving, can fail a course and still be out $7K for it. And there's really NO WAY to find out if you aren't - UNTIL YOU TRY. But absent physical/mental disabilities (or the inability to walk and chew gum at the same time), there's NO REASON WHY ANYONE CANNOT BE TAUGHT HOW TO DRIVE AND PASS A DOT TEST. Some people require more practice than others, some people just appear to be "naturals".

The thing that gets most folks sent home is ATTITUDE. And from what I see on many of these discussions, I harbor NO ILLUSIONS WHY some folks just don't make it.

Rick

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PackRat's Comment
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*LIKE !

Tim 's Comment
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So we're not allowed to call BS if somebody is spreading bad information? People considering a career will look at that post and think "all i need is 6 months and I'll have a ton of companies wanting to hire me". They will enter this profession with the wrong ideas and zero commitment. Anthony got his answer in that thread, and that question has been asked nearly weekly by students upgrading. It's always met with the same answer of it being a rumor, most people have a truck within a couple days.

I see nothing belittling anybody. If you guys can't handle somebody giving you the answer you wanted or have a discussion of why they disagree then go back to your safe place in mom's basement and stay off the internet. See, now THAT is belittling. I apologize (truthfully) if I offend you but so many people are coming on here and getting offended because a moderator tells them they're ideas are flawed. I went against the moderators and experienced drivers advice here and started doing local food service work, arguably one of the most difficult ways to enter this industry. I wasnt belittled or criticized for my choice. They did however help make sure I fully understood the difficulties I'd have.

Rob T, Obviously you can and should call BS when it is warranted. That is one of the things that make this a really good place to learn. However, if you were to look at some of the responses to some of the questions or what someone else has heard, it is hard not to understand what I was saying.

Sorry Tim your idea of being belittled or bashed is totally opposite of mine (ours).

G-Town, I don't think it is opposite of yours or the other moderators. It's just that sometimes people will make a remark or comment without thinking about how it will come across on the forum.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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Tim... that goes the other way too. Newbies come on here not even having turned a truck key yet and tell us about our own company.

When it comes to CDL schools.. we have seen dozens of people say they paid for school and graduated but the companies have a higher standard of background and DOT physical requirements. Then that person who just paid thousands and worked all day then went to school at night to get it done gets doors slammed in their face. Worse, after a few months of getting turned down, a comapny who is willing to accept him may say the 160 hour certificate is stale and requirws them to go through the company program anyway.

At Prime, someone coming in with the CDL gets reimbursement uo yo a certain amount but gets paid less and must do a longer training than those going through Prime.

But most schools will accept and tell students with DUi , failed drug tests and work history problems not to worry about it. Most will meet only the DOT physical, but then the students find companies will not accept their medications.

It is totally unfair to suggest to someone they go a certain path without giving them the information. Yes people have options but if you do not understand the consequences of those options, we do a disservice to the student.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DUI:

Driving Under the Influence

Aubrey M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If you're intent on being a driver and willing to work hard for at least a year then there is no need to worry about the 7000. This site has already beat to death the reasons to go to a company sponsored school so read that info g town posted.

As for Roehl, I'm starting my third month solo and even with the slow freight at this time of year i am still averaging good miles. I went solo the last week of February and am almost at 33000 miles as i type this. My paychecks have been between 700-1100 throughout that time and I've had 14 or 15 days of home time. I took off 7 days two weeks ago, 5 the previous month and 2 or 3 the week after first getting my truck. I should add my paycheck for the full week of home time was only 200 and some dollars because i had a day and a half of running at the beginning of that week.

I run for a month or more, but a friend of mine who runs regional (5 days on, 2 days off) is making the same or more miles and pay. He had a 3100 mile week last month and is new like me.

Go with a company program like everyone on here recommends and just worry about working your butt off safely the first year... Not money you won't have to pay back as long as you stay committed.

I have no regrets going with Roehl and don't worry about the 7000.

double-quotes-end.png

Wow thats 700 a week? So home time is like days off then, but lets say you want to take an actual vacation how does that work for you getting paid?

You're not eligible for vacation until after putting in 52 work weeks... so a year or better. At that point your vacation pay is determined to be 1.5% of what you grossed in that 52 weeks. Vacation is paid in one week increments.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Bird-one's Comment
member avatar

I think 2 things that are important to remember in Avvatars situation is 1. He never confirmed how much he was going to pay back and 2. Rhoel gave him 3 chances to pass the road test. This Wasn't a you had a chance, failed, no pay up. So they did work with him too an extent. Thats not a knock against him these things happen. And also I mentioned the amount he was going to have to pay back is unknown because i went through the paid cdl program with Schneider. You work a year you owe nothing. I worked only 3 months and they took a substantial amount from what i owed on the final bill. Had them paid back in about 3 months time and could go back if i wanted too.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

So rainy you're saying going to a school and having the CDL if you dont use it for a couple months could be considered stale? Can companies verify your 160 hour class?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

So rainy you're saying going to a school and having the CDL if you dont use it for a couple months could be considered stale? Can companies verify your 160 hour class?

The longer you wait to drive after getting a CDL from a private school, you decrease your desirability of being hired. An example is if you finished schooling, then didn’t drive for over six months since, your possibilities go down when applying somewhere with zero experience. It all depends on the employer. This is why we advise people that may be on the fence about driving to make the commitment prior to attending a private school or company-sponsored training.

If you complete schooling, they will give you the certificate, as long as all fees have been paid beforehand. It’s like your trucking basic education diploma. The schools keep records of graduates, so verification is simple.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

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