Pay From Companies?

Topic 25797 | Page 2

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Jeremy's Comment
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I dont know where you live but if your in the northeast expect your pay to run here significantly higher but also know everything is tougher here ive never made less than 75k a yr with weekends off but i run my a$$ off and work every bit as hard as i did in construction just less physical its def not for everyone

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I dont know where you live but if your in the northeast expect your pay to run here significantly higher but also know everything is tougher here ive never made less than 75k a yr with weekends off but i run my a$$ off and work every bit as hard as i did in construction just less physical its def not for everyone

Everything is more expensive too. The Walmart is Springfield MO is almost half the prices of my Walmart at home in NJ. A McDonalds meal that costs $6 in the south or midwest can cost $10 to $12 in the Northeast. Carthart bootd I paid $88 for in MO cost $175 back in NJ.

So be aware of these things if living on a budgrt.

Jeremy's Comment
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Im lucky enough to do all florida and chicago runs so i getthe best of both worlds but i earned that it wasnt given :)

Rubber Duck's Comment
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Can’t speak for every company but mine told me what I would make a week starting out as a rookie driver and they was pretty much spot on. These companies know what you can make as a rookie and as an experienced driver so I would just ask each recruiter you talk to what you can expect to make. You should also ask what you can make after your first year because what a rookie makes and what a guy with one year can make is a big difference. For example I was told I would make 1k a week as a rookie. Now if I make that I feel like i need to go apply for foodstamps.

So I'm looking if anyone can maybe give a round about of pay from some of the well known carriers for a new driver. By the mile & weekly would work. Trying to see if any company would be better than the other for starting a career.

Jason R. (Ruck)'s Comment
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Maverick starts new drivers (recent grads or cdl sponsorship students) at $0.52/mile for flatbed and $0.53/mile for glass. Plus they give an introductory $0.02/mile performance pay which can go up to $0.06/mile after your evaluation period. I have not found ANYONE that comes close for new drivers right out of school. And the flatbed is regional or OTR so you get home most weeks. I was there and loved the pay and the people. My body however is now repaying me for all the stupid crap I did when I was younger and I had to leave for my health sake. So I have now been looking at every company that I can and again, no one pays new drivers with little or no experience anything close to them. Oh....average is about 2200 miles a week for me when I drove and I was not super fast because of those dang tarps, which they do pay you to tarp as well. $20/tarped load. Also have detention pay and breakdown pay as well. Not sure what those amounts are though. This is as of May 1, 2019 when I left.

Hope this helps some. Ruck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Solo's Comment
member avatar

Have been Solo flatbedder for TMC for 4 months now and my lowest take home (after taxes) has been $1339.32 and my largest week (after taxes) has been $2202.49.

I'm staying in the $1500-$1600/wk after taxes range as an avg.

If you take my gross pay and just divide it by ALL miles (not including tarp and bounce pay), it works out to $.55/cpm

If you take my gross pay + tarp pay + bounce pay and divide it by dispatched miles, it jumps up to $.65/cpm

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Ruck, good to hear from you, had been wondering if you’d made it. Sorry to hear it didn’t work out, but sure you’ll find something.

Solo, are you about maxed out on your percentage? How high does it go?

Craig L.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow!!! I appreciate the response. I think my ultimate goal is to haul tanker (fuel) or other loads locally. Or even food service. And and Pepsi/Coke doesn't pay enough.

I can get my CDL but I want to come home every night or if not every night at least most of the week I want to be home.

Where can I find these jobs where should I be looking?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

Goodluck in florida a lot of competition for the better jobs there but im sure you can find something

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Your killing it at TMC . Goona make over 100k this year. Probably the world record at tmc for a company driver. Congrats

Have been Solo flatbedder for TMC for 4 months now and my lowest take home (after taxes) has been $1339.32 and my largest week (after taxes) has been $2202.49.

I'm staying in the $1500-$1600/wk after taxes range as an avg.

If you take my gross pay and just divide it by ALL miles (not including tarp and bounce pay), it works out to $.55/cpm

If you take my gross pay + tarp pay + bounce pay and divide it by dispatched miles, it jumps up to $.65/cpm

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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