Why Does This Offer Come Now?

Topic 25802 | Page 2

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Robsteeler, I've jumped into a very similar situation myself. I left Swift Academy as an instructor a few months ago, and took the job of Program Director in Memphis for a company that has contracted with Amazon to teach selected Amazonians CDL and help get their licenses.

Amazon is making a big push to handle their own logistics. If you what to join the company that's doing their best to beat Walmart at getting merch into customers hands, now is the time to move. In my opinion your current opportunity won't be available very long.

Neither you nor I would be Amazon employees, but we'll be on the edges of the growing behemoth. This logistical sector is growing quickly. Of course you have to make your own decisions about who to work for, but I'm just adding in my perspective on Amazon's move into logistics.

Trucking Truth preaches "Don't be a job hopper" and to stick with your first company for a year. But your situation isn't a matter to switching fishbowls. Add this into your thinking.

You aren’t doing the new truck delivery any longer?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Grumps wonders...

You aren’t doing the new truck delivery any longer?

Very similar to what TT says about owner operators - to make money you can't stop driving. I guess I didn't have the hustle needed.

And being required to stay in hotels, a few times I was delayed, meaning an average of $70/day in added expenses while I sat for weather and delivery scheduling.

I do agree with Rick for drivers - stay with that first job! But Robsteeler's opportunity is to a non-driving job. In that case drivers might feel better if their boss has held an 18" steering wheel for a while.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Grumps wonders...

double-quotes-start.png

You aren’t doing the new truck delivery any longer?

double-quotes-end.png

Very similar to what TT says about owner operators - to make money you can't stop driving. I guess I didn't have the hustle needed.

And being required to stay in hotels, a few times I was delayed, meaning an average of $70/day in added expenses while I sat for weather and delivery scheduling.

I do agree with Rick for drivers - stay with that first job! But Robsteeler's opportunity is to a non-driving job. In that case drivers might feel better if their boss has held an 18" steering wheel for a while.

In Robsteler’s case I agree he should at least listen, and decide from there.

Sorry to hear your gig didn’t work out, it sounded like an interesting job.

I am extremely happy with my choice, and as long as nothing major changes, will probably retire there.

I’ve driven for 10 weeks solo for a total of 542 hours, so I am averaging 54 hours a week. That works out to $1084 a week for a newbie, and hopefully as I get better I will get even more hours. My low was 46.15, my high was 68.24. At least 80% and maybe more is drop and hook.

A lot of people in our drivers Facebook group are whining they aren’t getting hours. But those same drivers were complaining that I should have sat for 6 hours for a trailer inspection and take a chance my 3 loads would be cancelled and given to someone else. I said that if I kept the trailer until I got to another truck stop I would get it done. If not, it still had 28 days left. Those guys are perfectly willing to sit because they get paid.

I am convinced they run me like they do because I do everything possible to avoid live load/unload. If it is somewhere we have empties I always drop and hook. The ones complaining they aren’t getting loads are constantly posting about spending 7 or more hours unloading and never look for an empty.

If it were your company, who would you give the load to?

I got the trailer inspected by the way.

I did 62 hours so far this week, and that includes 24 hours of sitting due to schedules ( 3 times at 8 hours). I have 7 hours left on my clock, a 2 hour drive and possibly a live unload, then home.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

G. O. M. offers his condolences:

Sorry to hear your gig didn’t work out, it sounded like an interesting job.

Yeah, there were fun aspects to delivering spankin' new trucks the USA. But I've got my dream job now. The company is setting up the school brand new. Not open for business for a few more weeks.

If anyone can stop by in Memphis (think I-40) let me know.

TT.errolv@spamgourmet.com

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Errol's Bio "A school teacher for eleven years. Now I'm getting out of the classroom!! A trucker for three years. The Oops! I'm become a Driving Instructor! ... Now I'm back in the classroom!!"

Once a teacher, always a teacher. You and Turtle are following a similar path in somewhat different ways. Looking forward to tales from your new adventure!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

Looks like I’ll be taking this position. I can’t pass up being home with my family every night. I’m really gonna miss driving the truck though. I might have to get an old semi to pull an RV trailer now. 😂

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Rob, can't find any fault with you decision. I wish you the very best with your new venture!

PackRat's Comment
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good-luck.gif

PJ's Comment
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good-luck.gif

Susan D. 's Comment
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Errol.. I figured it was about time Amazon started running their own cdl school. They pay for cdl school through their "career choice " program already, but funny thing is.. everyone I know who got their cdl through that program, opted to take a buyout and leave after getting it, because they didn't pay nearly enough. West side hauled their freight a little, a couple years ago.. we pulled out because their rates are horrible. I see these (O/O) trucks pulling the prime trailers and I really feel sorry for them.

The plus for you is that you're not actually employed by them, I gather? They do have excellent benefits, but the awesomeness ends there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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