Why Does This Offer Come Now?

Topic 25802 | Page 1

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Robsteeler's Comment
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I'm really a bit torn right now, and I kind of wish this offer came a year or so ago before I started this. I know a guy that was my lieutenant when I made sergeant, then I was his Captain after a few years just contacted me. He's upper management with a company that handles delivery logistics nationwide for Amazon. He wants to hire me for administrative work managing dispatchers in their Philadelphia office. He knows how well I did in my leo days with that and he offered me close to my current pay. I would be home every day though. The issue is that I spent so much blood, sweat, and tears to get where I am now, just over a month away from finishing a year driving. I would probably jump on it if I hadn't worked so hard and perservered though so many difficulties. I'm not sure if I should meet with him and discuss it as he wants, or just tell him I'm not interested. Any thoughts guys and gals?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

I'm sure the same position will be open a year or 2 from now as well. It is entirely your choice. Personally, I enjoy the Trucking lifestyle. Right now, there is nothing else I would rather be doing. Next year I may feel completely different. Life changes daily. Follow your gut.smile.gif

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, some days I feel like catching a bus home, lol!😂 Other days, I absolutely love what I'm doing. Every day though, I love driving the truck, so that's why I'm torn. If I did this, it would be the end of driving. I don't think I can do that. I don't know. I'll really have to think about this.

Hobo's Comment
member avatar

There's no harm in at least talking with him about it. If you love trucking that's one thing but feeling you have to stick with it could potentially limit you.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Rob, if there weren't advantages to you with this offer, you wouldn't be posting about it. And it sounds like you are intrigued by it. Check it out, by all means. Make two lists on paper. On one sheet list all the advantages of trucking and on another list all the advantages of this other job. Then ponder it for a while and make a choice.

BTW, do you have a wife or kids/grandkids? Take them into consideration. There are worse things than being in demand!

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Rob it costs nothing but time to meet with him and hear him out. You learned many years ago in our former profession to always keep your options open. IF its right you’ll know it. That 6th sense we have will tell you. Besides if he wants you that bad he’ll work the timing out. It’s kinda like promotions. Being in the right place at the right time. You could be a real asset with your driving experience. Keep an open mind sir!!

Army 's Comment
member avatar

I agree with the others, meet with him, but I would at least finish your year with your company, and maybe counter him on pay... lol. Might be able to get a little more if you decide.

I guess last thought, what made you come to trucking? Would you miss it?

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Rob, if you do jump back into supervision (after 17 years of it I wouldn't touch it with a pole!), don't give up your CDL-A and DOT Med. Those don't require a truck to maintain, and you're giving yourself a tactical advantage with Plan B. Finish out a year if you can before committing to a job swap. If you can, perhaps a visit to the dispatch center to see what you're inheriting may be prudent. Public Safety dispatch, as you know, is kind of a different animal than what you'd be getting into.

In any event, it's nice to have options! Good Luck, Brother!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Robsteeler, I've jumped into a very similar situation myself. I left Swift Academy as an instructor a few months ago, and took the job of Program Director in Memphis for a company that has contracted with Amazon to teach selected Amazonians CDL and help get their licenses.

Amazon is making a big push to handle their own logistics. If you what to join the company that's doing their best to beat Walmart at getting merch into customers hands, now is the time to move. In my opinion your current opportunity won't be available very long.

Neither you nor I would be Amazon employees, but we'll be on the edges of the growing behemoth. This logistical sector is growing quickly. Of course you have to make your own decisions about who to work for, but I'm just adding in my perspective on Amazon's move into logistics.

Trucking Truth preaches "Don't be a job hopper" and to stick with your first company for a year. But your situation isn't a matter to switching fishbowls. Add this into your thinking.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Finish out your year - leave on good terms.

A decent prospective employer, should appreciate your desire to finish what you started. Then, with that year of experience under your belt )and leaving on good terms), you should be able to get a hire or go on elsewhere if the new gig isn't what you thought it would be.

For some people, the bug bites HARD and they wouldn't consider anything else but driving. For others, opportunities arrive that are better than what they left to go OTR.

So go have a discussion. The only one who can determine your short/long term goals is YOU. But DO FINISH YOUR YEAR OUT.

Rick

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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