Which Company Would Offer Regular Home Time?

Topic 25923 | Page 3

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Hicks's Comment
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I do not get that at Swift.

As I've said, I've driven for Swift for over a year now, and out of the 6 hometime requests approved two weeks or more in advance, only 1 has ever been on time. 1 was a snowstorm that closed NY roads, 3 were sitting and not having a load going home until after the approved time, and the most recent time they just *forgot all about it* and I called them 4 days after the hometime was scheduled to *end*.

That last one I'm not mad about or anything, there was nothing time critical that I missed. I called in because the *coming up* hometime was a critical doctor's appointment I couldn't miss and I was like.... hey... I need to go to California for this hometime? And also you forgot about me.

So far Swift has a 16.67% completion rate for on time home time. For me. And that is just the facts that happened. I'm not mad or anything; In my experience it is wise to just always expect to be at least 2 days late to get home, and never ever schedule a can't miss appointment on the first day back

Old School's Comment
member avatar
So far Swift has a 16.67% completion rate for on time home time. For me.

Hicks, how many miles per week are you averaging? How's your on time delivery record?

It's possible you have a rookie driver manager , or just a lousy one, but very few top performing drivers have an experience like yours.

I called them 4 days after the hometime was scheduled to *end*.

I never have these kind of issues, but I always communicate well with my support team. You should call about a week before your scheduled hometime, or send a Quallcomm message. Then follow up again a few days later. You can't expect them to be really focused on you if you don't stand out as a really great and productive driver.

The transportation business is completely biased toward their top producers. Most of the time when drivers can't get things the way they want or need, they will blame the company. Usually they could take steps to make sure these things go the way they've planned. It's all part of a rookie's transition into becoming a professional.

Why Some Drivers Are Treated Better Than Others

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Hicks something isn't right. Our DMs have service records and goals just like we do. One of the things they get dinged for is not getting drivers home on time.

I've been at Swift doing otr reefer for two years and have been late for two hometimes. One due to a blizzard and one due to a combination of breakdown and tornados.

I don't go beyond Nebraska within ten days of hometime. I usually get back to southern cali three days before hometime and i turn myself into a local driver helping out picking up loads or delivering loads for other drivers. I will also do trailer moves so that some of the live loads become preloaded for other drivers.

I suggest having a conversation with your dm and if you can't work it out you may want to look for a different dm.

Sorry for hijacking the thread.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

I drive for Roehl and my uncle died a few weeks ago on a Tuesday. I didn’t know the funeral date but was on my way out to the east coast from Wisconsin and called my FM and she offered me to come home by Monday for a possible funeral on Tuesday. The next day I called her and said the funereal is scheduled for the following Thursday and she still said I should come home and be with family by Monday and take the whole next week off. I decided to stay out till Wednesday cause I need to make a consistent check but was still home in time by Wednesday for the funeral on Thursday. The fact she was willing to give me the whole week off to spend with family shows that my company cares about their drivers being with family. They also offer to do 11 days out and be home for 3 days too. I stay out cause I like the pay but with Roehl you can’t go wrong if you’re willing to work.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

I drive for a smaller company, 125 trucks, that is owned by a bigger company with a total of 3k trucks. Home time is never an issue. When I need time off, like in July when I take my oldest to USC for freshman orientation They gave me Monday & Tuesday off. And in August when we move her into college they will have me home so I can do that as well.

I am home weekly except when they need someone to solo a team trip. I am the goto guy and I get it done. They help me and I am always helping others even in our yard. You have to have the right positive attitude in this industry and you have to not get flustered by traffic and remember safety is king. My normal run is 2 trips a week from South Carolina to the midwest and back. (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, & Michigan LP) This past week they needed help with loads to Florida, SO I helped them out. Being flexible and staying positive is key.

ChrisEMT's Comment
member avatar

Hello, I had worked for Werner 4 1/2 years, and I say worked because I had to be home nightly for personal reasons, and left on good terms. I can tell you from my experience, research all the major carriers that are on dedicated accounts near your home, or go through your hometown, and you should be able to get onto one that will get you home on weekends, or at least every week for a 34 hour reset.

I can tell you, I was on a dedicated account with a great fm/dm/planner/boss. He always got me over 2000 (most of the time over 2100 even), and I averaged right around 60 cents a mile (58-62) and grossed 1200/week on the low end. And I could have gotten more miles if I wanted, and told him that I wanted more, so we (yes I said we) planned my week early on paper. My best week on that account was 2400 miles and I was home by 1pm Friday and had until 10am on Sunday off.

So good money is out there, just find a company that works for you that you will get along with, and that you can you work out for the company. I found that if I let my company know what I wanted and made a few calls to show my interest, they assigned me to the accounts I wanted. I also worked my tail off so I would be desirable for my last account, got to know what my boss wanted and expected, and told him what I wanted and expected, and through good communication and planning we all were happy.... He got his loads done quick, and with few hiccups, and I got the miles and money.... Chris

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

If you want regular hometime, would definitely look into regional flatbed, TMC, Maverick, etc. A lot of them are home every weekend. I’ve talked to Maverick drivers who haven’t missed a weekend home in years. I also know Maverick has several dedicated accounts in NC that get drivers home every night.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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