Advice Please - Started Solo And Second Time This Is Happening.

Topic 26001 | Page 2

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Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Jj,

You may have to get used to night driving but it's great when you can do it. It'll save you a ton of time getting through congested metropolitan places like atlanta and nashville.

Personally, when I'm under a load I use the clock as efficiently as possible, if that's taking a break a reciever, or driving at night.

Rob S.'s Comment
member avatar

JJ, It sounds to me like most of your concern is related to driving without proper rest. When you're OTR you can never have what civilians call "proper rest". When you have to shift from day driving to night driving as the loads vary, don't be afraid to take an extra short break. Pulling off to catch a 20 minute nap sometimes does wonders to refresh you. You won't be earning during that time but you won't be driving off the road either. After a couple months you'll get used to it and it won't bother you. When I had to drive an "off" shift I would wake, shower, and have a small coffee with some honey in it. That's as close as I get to an energy drink. Be patient and stay safe.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School said: "I always put myself on sleeper berth at shippers/receivers. If I'm going to be waiting on them, I'm going to be trying to sleep."

Ok, I have a question. The company I worked for, Schneider, didn't allow split sleeper time. So what if I'm delayed at a shipper/receiver and I put myself on sleeper berth. Then 4 hours later, I get loaded/unloaded and I need to get going towards the next assignment. Do I just change sleeper berth to "off duty/not driving"?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Make sure you show some on duty time. Be safe.

So started solo 2 weeks ago and my fleet manager told me once you reach receiver, change your HOS to sleeper berth while waiting. So last week this happened and today again. It took them almost 6 hours to unload and I am running out of hours but on clock I am on sleeper berth for 6 hours and fleet manager wants me to wait for another 4 more hours and start my next trip. I am trying to sleep but I slept all night and not sleepy. Last time I was able to sleep for 3.5 hours. Today I am not sleepy at all and now I am worried about driving at night. What am I supposed to do in these types of situations?

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School said: "I always put myself on sleeper berth at shippers/receivers. If I'm going to be waiting on them, I'm going to be trying to sleep."

Ok, I have a question. The company I worked for, Schneider, didn't allow split sleeper time. So what if I'm delayed at a shipper/receiver and I put myself on sleeper berth. Then 4 hours later, I get loaded/unloaded and I need to get going towards the next assignment. Do I just change sleeper berth to "off duty/not driving"?

You put yourself in sleeper - in the event you get jammed up/stuck somewhere and can stretch it to a 10 hour break (and reset your 11/14) or a split (if your company allows them) and freeze your 14.

You can just go OFF DUTY - and it still saves your 70 either way. But most folks go sleeper, in the event you can actually use it for a split or 10 hour break.

A lot depends on your company rules. "Technically" - if you are NOT IN THE SLEEPER, you're not supposed to be logged there.

So - for example (that I've never heard happen) - if you were on the dock supervising unloading, and a DOT guy walks up to ask and see your logs and you are in "sleeper" - LOG VIOLATION. Likewise - being in a TS taking a shower or having dinner is not sleeper either.

In the case of the OP on this thread - their concern is - that by NOT BEING ABLE TO SLEEP while waiting 10 hours at a shipper logged in sleeper - and then being DISPATCHED FOR A LOAD, that they may get fatigued even with a full clock (after a 10 hour break) and be unable to ACTUALLY DRIVE the 11 hours they have on the clock (resulting in a missed appointment).

Probably happens more than one would think. You wake up after a full nights sleep - drive an hour or two, and get stuck for 10. Can't get back to sleep while you're stuck, because you just got up and aren't tired. Now you've been up for 12 hours, and probably have another few hours until you're tired and ready to go to sleep.

As Rainy said - DO COMMUNICATE VIA QC about your concerns so there is a record of it.

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Ok, I have a question. The company I worked for, Schneider, didn't allow split sleeper time. So what if I'm delayed at a shipper/receiver and I put myself on sleeper berth. Then 4 hours later, I get loaded/unloaded and I need to get going towards the next assignment. Do I just change sleeper berth to "off duty/not driving"?

You won't need to change anything, Bruce. Putting yourself in sleeper doesn't necessarily mean you are doing a split. Your simply logging that you're in the sleeper. Doing so will also open up the possibility of using the 8hr sleeper berth provision, pausing your clock. That's a whole separate thing from the split. You don't need to do a split to take advantage of pausing your clock with the 8-hour provision.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Ok, I have a question. The company I worked for, Schneider, didn't allow split sleeper time. So what if I'm delayed at a shipper/receiver and I put myself on sleeper berth. Then 4 hours later, I get loaded/unloaded and I need to get going towards the next assignment. Do I just change sleeper berth to "off duty/not driving"?

double-quotes-end.png

You won't need to change anything, Bruce. Putting yourself in sleeper doesn't necessarily mean you are doing a split. Your simply logging that you're in the sleeper. Doing so will also open up the possibility of using the 8hr sleeper berth provision, pausing your clock. That's a whole separate thing from the split. You don't need to do a split to take advantage of pausing your clock with the 8-hour provision.

What he's saying is - Schneider doesn't do splits - so the 8 hours in sleeper doesn't freeze their 14. So for Pumpkin drivers it wouldn't matter. But being in sleeper can stretch the 8 into a 10 if need be.

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Sleeper Berth:

The portion of the tractor behind the seats which acts as the "living space" for the driver. It generally contains a bed (or bunk beds), cabinets, lights, temperature control knobs, and 12 volt plugs for power.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Right, but the 8hr provision isn't a split. It's a separate thing all by itself. I've heard no mention of Schneider not allowing that.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Great information, fellas! Thank you.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Right, but the 8hr provision isn't a split. It's a separate thing all by itself. I've heard no mention of Schneider not allowing that.

When I discussed it with my DBL, he said Schneider requires us to have a full 10 hour break. So using the 8 hour provision would be breaking company policy as well.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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