How Hosed Am I?

Topic 26280 | Page 2

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Joseph I.'s Comment
member avatar

KJ you realize in acknowledging it was your fault you just blamed your training, your trainer, the GPS and your companies policy for following the GPS. Until you realize none of those things contributed or caused your accident you are probably much better off not in a truck.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Minimum cost for a rollover is $350,000

Drivers not taking responsibility....

priceless

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Mainly your fault?

Who was driving?

All your fault. You had a rollover. Preventable accident. You were the driver. You'll never get anywhere trying to deflect the blame. All of it is yours. Own it.

Phantom 850's Comment
member avatar

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(The law firm of Dewey, Cheatem, and Howe is in no way affiliated with TruckingTruth.com)

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’m amazed you even got out of training at Roehl based on what I’m reading here. Does Roehl still show the video in training of their driver that followed his gps over a covered wooden bridge and then put the truck in the ditch trying to make a turn similiar to what you describe?? They used to.

You are trying to deflect blame. You say your ideal route was better than theirs, then why did you not talk with dispatch about it. When I was there they had a route in PA that was horrible. I figured out a different way that was much safer and presented it. Guess what, they approved it.

Your failures have been your own. We have all been there. The big difference is we communicate with the powers to be as soon as we see a problem in the making and find a solution before it gets out of hand.

I had awesome trainers there. I get some aren’t. Did you communicate your perception of yours being poor to anyone?? My guess is no. If I’m wrong feel free to say so.

You rolled their truck. Your complaining you owe them 7k for a cdl that may not do you any good now. Here is my thought. You pay for the damages you caused and they can erase your school debt.

I thank god it is only property damage and no one got hurt or killed.

It sounds like you had other issues leading up to this. Consider another career before you hurt yourself or someone else.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have to agree with everyone else here. Whatever happens in that truck is your responsibility. Period.

Do companies really force you to follow a specific route on an average load? I know on some high value loads they do, but as an everyday occurrence? I followed my company’s suggested route twice, and no I refuse to even look at them. Not local directions, I follow those, but the route from point A to point B. The two times I followed them they put me on roads that were insane. One had a hotshot turn that with my truck against the curb on the drivers side, my tandems just cleared on the other side. I follow my own route now until I get to local streets. No one has ever said a word.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
icecold24k's Comment
member avatar

I have to agree with everyone else here. Whatever happens in that truck is your responsibility. Period.

Do companies really force you to follow a specific route on an average load? I know on some high value loads they do, but as an everyday occurrence? I followed my company’s suggested route twice, and no I refuse to even look at them. Not local directions, I follow those, but the route from point A to point B. The two times I followed them they put me on roads that were insane. One had a hotshot turn that with my truck against the curb on the drivers side, my tandems just cleared on the other side. I follow my own route now until I get to local streets. No one has ever said a word.

Exactly I 100% agree. When I was OTR there were many times I didn't follow the company fuel routing exactly. Not a word was ever said. I never went excessively out of route and didn't make a habit of it, however I did what was more safe.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

I just talked to a Roehl driver, and he said all drivers were informed about the incident and he has been with them 4 yrs. Their version is a bit different from KJ'S.

Why didn't you take the curve more cautiously? You sound as if you are blaming everyone else but the driver in control of the tractor. That would be you! Whether you are loaded or empty, the dynamics are the same. There's always "Barber College " as a backup. You need to slow down and think.

Raptor

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Raptor that is suprsing you got a different version.. How can that be??wtf.gif

Now for the serious side, KJ by his own writings is his own worst enemy. He’s probably on social media bashing Roehl as yet another big company out to get the average guy.

Different companies have different attitudes when it comes to routing and fuel stops. Some are very strict and others aren’t. However that is all information one should learn in training like day 1, maybe day 2. Grumpy and icecold said their companies aren’t very strict. I know Stevens Transport tells their drivers they have a 10 percent leway on out of route miles then they get charged if they go over that.

When I was at Roehl they expected you to follow their routing OR call your DM and discuss a better route. They always left the door open to doing things safer and better. Most companies are using PC Miler and it does produce some screwy routing at times.

The important takaway here for me is

Personal accountability Communicate Slow down or stop until you know exactly what to do next.

I hope new folks read this and realize just how serious this career is and how everything can change in the blink of an eye.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
KJ's Comment
member avatar

I just talked to a Roehl driver, and he said all drivers were informed about the incident and he has been with them 4 yrs. Their version is a bit different from KJ'S.

Raptor

I'm sure you have. They won't even let me see the video. They just said take our word for it.

And no, I'm not bashing anyone. The trailer fell into a ditch. It turned the truck over. There was nowhere to pull over to scout out the curve beforehand. I was specifically told never to obstruct traffic, so stopping in the middle of a highway is a no go.

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