Youtube Videos

Topic 26318 | Page 5

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icecold24k's Comment
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Nothing wrong with YouTube. Probably hard to learn a whole lot but you'll get an idea of how things are. TB is alright too but, I have to be pretty bored to watch truckers talk about trucking for entertainment. But I talk to truckers all day usually so there is that. I did watch a ton of Dale Clay's videos on flatbed stuff when I made my mind up that i would start in flatbed.

I love Dale Clays videos. He always had a positive attitude and was a glass half full kinda guy. He made flatbedding look so easy haha.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Maybe Brett should follow up on moderator approved videos that would actually help a new driver

I've tried that several times over the years and there are very, very few people out there making YouTube videos for trucking that are worthwhile. Most of it is just garbage. In today's world, the only thing that sells to the masses is drama, outrage, cynicism, or doomsayers. Almost no one makes YouTube videos to be the light of hope. It doesn't garner enough attention. I'd rather we make our own videos, but to do so professionally is very time consuming and takes decent equipment.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Nothing wrong with YouTube. Probably hard to learn a whole lot but you'll get an idea of how things are.

I don't agree with that. What you'll mostly find is cynicism, griping, and misinformation. Most people who bill themselves as "telling it like it is" are most often just complainers who aren't happy or successful in trucking playing the "poor me" card. The problem when you're brand new to something is you rarely know who is right and who is full of baloney.

One measure I've always used in my life when I've wanted to learn how to do something is to take advice from people who both love what they do and are highly successful at it. Look at our moderators, for instance. They all love trucking and they have all achieved sustained success at the highest level. They can tell you what it takes to achieve a high level of success or what path to avoid taking. Most of the YouTubers just want to warn you about all the perils out there, because that's what garners attention and gets visitors.

Humans are naturally drawn to people who talk about the dark side of things because it's our natural instinct to protect ourselves from harm. That's why so many people are hooked on the doom and gloom of the daily news. They feel like they have to know about everything bad going on in the world so they don't get hurt. Unfortunately, the doomsayers on YouTube spouting off about the perils and evil empires of trucking are no different. They garner a lot of attention because people have a strong natural desire to avoid danger.

However, people who are the most successful in life are far bolder. They're not concerned with the dark side. They want to know what they can do to make themselves better. They don't go into a shell and play defense in life, they go on the attack and play offense. They go out there and outwork everyone, strive to reach the highest level of success, and love to compete. They also know it's important to develop strong relationships and become part of a winning team. So the cynicism, the doomsaying, and the foreboding don't play well in that crowd. That's the crowd we play to hear at Trucking Truth. That's not the crowd most YouTubers are playing to.

You have to be very selective about the people you take advice from. I did a podcast on that, in fact:

Episode 19: You're Getting Career Advice From The Wrong People

Joe S.'s Comment
member avatar

Well i just backed the uhaul trailer in my driveway about 300 feet and no way are you learning how to do that on You Tube!!!

Errol V.'s Comment
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Well i just backed the uhaul trailer in my driveway about 300 feet and no way are you learning how to do that on You Tube!!!

That's great, Joe, but the axle of your U-Haul trailer is somewhere near half-way back. Axles of a 53' long trailer are almost all the way to the back end. There is almost no comparison between the two.

Joe S.'s Comment
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Yes Errol i fully realize that im not a dummy just joking because my thread went hay wire! I think ill put some more thought into asking questions from now on. But i will continue to read, post?? Not do sure!

Rob T.'s Comment
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I think ill put some more thought into asking questions from now on. But i will continue to read, post?? Not do sure!

Why? That's how you, and many others who read without posting learn. Sometimes the answers you get may come across as annoyed but you need to keep in kind many people ask similar questions and then become hostile because they feel they know everything because "diesel is in my veins" due to many family members being in the industry, or they seen youtube videos that said all mega companies are trash. We are passionate about this industry and just trying to help have you realistic expectations about what's to come. Keep in mind many of the drivers here are spending some of their valuable 10 hour break posting here to help rookies and those considering a career. Helping newcomers is a time consuming commitment but we've all been there. If we can help even 1 person be a successful professional driver and help change the negative image truck drivers have then it's well worth the time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joe S.'s Comment
member avatar

Rob T. I fully appreciate all the time you guys take to respond and i know you are passionate and very helpful . That topic went way off base. I was thinking more about fundamentals rather then skills. Like I've said before im a truck loader not a truck driver just trying to learn. Years back the union( yes I'm a Teamsters know alot of you dont like that, but its where i work) was going to offer CDL training but it never happened. So im looking to get educated.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
yes I'm a Teamster

You aren't alone. We've got a few other Teamsters in here.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Rob T. I fully appreciate all the time you guys take to respond and i know you are passionate and very helpful . That topic went way off base. I was thinking more about fundamentals rather then skills. Like I've said before im a truck loader not a truck driver just trying to learn. Years back the union( yes I'm a Teamsters know alot of you dont like that, but its where i work) was going to offer CDL training but it never happened. So im looking to get educated.

Joe S : I recently posted a comment about my difficulties of backing a lawn tractor with a garden trailer behind. LOL I could back my tractor and trailer much more accurately. But that was a completely different level of responsibility. Like all the experienced drivers have said, it takes time and practice to be good at backing. The key is to not get discouraged and to become adept at learning your reference points and turning points. It takes most drivers at least a year to get really good.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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