School Bus To Truck 160 Academy In Illinois With Swift

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Adirondack Bob's Comment
member avatar

Read my lips. I did not say they were the same. I said it helped me. Just as having driven a standard "helped me" when I had to learn to double clutch. I feel I had a bit of a head start when it came time to learn how to double clutch. I'm talking about MY experience. For you, or anyone, to tell me I'm wrong is the epitome of arrogance.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

You're saying I'm arrogant because I said it's not the same. Then you say it's not the same... If you say so lol.

Your experience is your experience. You can't tell something it'll be a head start for them because you felt it was for you. That also sounds pretty arrogant.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Tina, hope you figure it out as you go into your training progression.

Some brand new wannabe's still with their learners paper apparently take less time.

Hopefully, you go into training and ask questions if needed, then learn from the answers offered at school or on the TT site.

Good luck to you.

Adirondack Bob's Comment
member avatar

You're saying I'm arrogant because I said it's not the same. Then you say it's not the same... If you say so lol.

Your experience is your experience. You can't tell something it'll be a head start for them because you felt it was for you. That also sounds pretty arrogant.

No. You, and others, are saying what I'm saying is wrong. I said I expected my school bus experience to be a plus and it was. Other "experienced" drivers said it wouldn't be. Once I went thru the training I saw that it did help, immensely. Yet some of you still want to stroke your trucking egos and claim I'm wrong. Yes, it was "my" experience and I would think it would also help others for all the same reasons.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You're saying I'm arrogant because I said it's not the same. Then you say it's not the same... If you say so lol.

Your experience is your experience. You can't tell something it'll be a head start for them because you felt it was for you. That also sounds pretty arrogant.

double-quotes-end.png

No. You, and others, are saying what I'm saying is wrong. I said I expected my school bus experience to be a plus and it was. Other "experienced" drivers said it wouldn't be. Once I went thru the training I saw that it did help, immensely. Yet some of you still want to stroke your trucking egos and claim I'm wrong. Yes, it was "my" experience and I would think it would also help others for all the same reasons.

Because you are wrong. Has nothing to do with ego or opinion, it's fact. You know it is.

You started on this forum asking "will it be easier/shorter". You didn't get the answer you wanted and you got your panties in a bunch.

Now you're saying it's different but it helped with double clutching. There's no trucking ego here, you're just sensitive.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

You're saying I'm arrogant because I said it's not the same. Then you say it's not the same... If you say so lol.

Your experience is your experience. You can't tell something it'll be a head start for them because you felt it was for you. That also sounds pretty arrogant.

double-quotes-end.png

No. You, and others, are saying what I'm saying is wrong. I said I expected my school bus experience to be a plus and it was. Other "experienced" drivers said it wouldn't be. Once I went thru the training I saw that it did help, immensely. Yet some of you still want to stroke your trucking egos and claim I'm wrong. Yes, it was "my" experience and I would think it would also help others for all the same reasons.

Wow Bob, you're 100% correct again! I'm on here most every day to "stroke my trucking ego". Thanks for figuring that out. You should be a detective. Good luck to you,Bob. Don't let that Learners Permit get wet.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Bob, sometimes a person needs to use a little discretion, especially when they're the new guy on the block. If you feel driving a school bus helped you, great. Good for you.

I drove a full-size school bus for a year, and I also drove big rigs for 15 years. Other than swinging wider on turns, the two are basically unrelated. So I don't agree with you that school bus experience will help much at all, but you can believe what you like. Many of the experienced truck drivers here have driven buses or straight trucks in their careers, so they also have experience with both. They've also shared their opinions.

I've been in this industry for 26 years and do you know what causes people to get fired or fail their training more than anything else? They think they know it all and they never stop arguing with their instructors, dispatch, safety, or other drivers. They wind up failing or being fired because they won't listen so they don't learn the things they're supposed to. They also cause more trouble than they're worth.

A little humility and discretion go a long way. The lack of it ends many new careers quickly. Know when to smile and say, "Ok, thanks for the help" and stop trying to prove your point to people with vastly more knowledge and experience. Pick your battles wisely, more wisely than you have thus far.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hey that’s great Bob...glad it helped you.

Funny thing when I read your replies, there is nothing really specific about how bus driving experience helped reduce your learning curve.

I drove straight trucks for many years before going to tractor trailer school. Other than the height and width there are few similarities. And your point about double clutching? School buses are much lighter, they are either auto or have synchronized transmissions that do not require double-clutching.

No ego stroking. Helping set realistic expectations for Tina, and not setting false ones like you have.

Good luck on your test.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I also got my start driving school buses. Moved to motor coach tour buses.

Years later got my CDL with Swift. No problem for me in that "transition". But as an instructor in Swift's Academy, I taught two experienced Greyhound drivers how to do the straight line backup. (Note, this wasn't an assignment, just luck of the draw.)

Both did their best. Couldn't make the grade. I don't say it can't be done. But in my observation of two motor coach drivers, I recommend that other bus drivers take extra care over the motor skills they already possess.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I deleted your comment, Bob. Try again without the snarky attitude or go somewhere else.

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