NYC? 5 Stops By 2pm? Challenge Accepted!

Topic 26438 | Page 4

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Pete E Pothole's Comment
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I know if it can be done Turtle is one of the people who can. Still think it will be tough. The challenging days though are the best when it all works out.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Honestly, I don't really think it's going to happen. There are just far too many variables that can go wrong. Like OS said, everything will have to go perfectly in order for this to work out.

speedy forklift operators

I believe this will be the biggest factor that'll make or break me.

However, I'm giving myself the best chance of success. I just arrived at the first stop, and will spend the night here. Maybe I'll get lucky and someone will show up early to offload me.

I'm also changing up the order of drops. What would have been my second drop will now be my final, in White Plains. That customer receives until 3pm, giving me a tic more breathing room. Plus, in the event I still can't make the final delivery in time, I'd rather park in White Plains for the night instead of Long Island, leaving myself a shorter and easier ride home Wed morning after empty.

So from here to Brooklyn, then to Bronx, then Long Island before rolling to the final in White Plains.

Well see what happens. The angst is killing me.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

All the confidence I have that you'll get it done if possible, Rich.

I know you know this, but watch that traffic going from drop to drop in transit. People up there drive not so great....Plus the suicidal bicyclists. Deep breaths. Repeat....

Then that dentist thing Wednesday? I'd rather be in NYC, and I won't even go there in a truck!

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Not happening. That is all...

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

Look on the bright side. Had you pulled that rabbit out of the hat, you would have created a whole new level of expectation from Prime.

Like in the movie "Miracle." "Again!"

PackRat's Comment
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Not happening. That is all...

But you'll live to drive another day. The journey continues regardless.

Turtle's Comment
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you would have created a whole new level of expectation from Prime.

No doubt about that. They already know I can work miracles, but this one was just a little out of reach. I still maintain a certain level of expectation from myself, even when I know it probably can't be done.

I gave it my best. It was just an impossible task. There's simply no way to get those stops taken care of in 6 - 7 hours.

The first drop went as smooth as can be expected, I guess. Although they didn't get to me early as I'd hoped, they did have me unloaded by 0815.

Rolled from there up into Staten Island without incident. Traffic was dense but moving. When I crossed the bridge and dropped down into Brooklyn, I hit a brick wall. Between the traffic, construction, double parkers, and millions of people all with their own agenda, I could not make any headway. It literally took like 5 hours to roll into Brooklyn, get unloaded, and get out. That's a distance of maybe 30 miles tops. I've had good and bad experiences in Brooklyn, but today was the absolute worst.

I barely made it over to my 3rd stop in the Bronx. The last 2 miles took 45 minutes! I rolled in right at receiving cut off, 1500. Thankfully they didn't send me away. They could have. I did call them on the way, so they knew I was coming.

Only 3 of the 5 loads got dropped today. I'm disappointed that I couldn't do more, but it was completely out of my control. Had I only had a bigger delivery window, it could have been possible.

I'm now parked at the Long Island drop. I'll knock that off in the morning, then hit White Plains, then boogie my behind to the house. The hardest stops are done!

I don't think us big trucks have any business being in places like this. It takes every ounce of focus and skill you have as a driver, just to navigate and maneuver through these streets without hitting something or taking a wrong turn. I've never been afraid to take on these challenges, but it seems it would be far safer and easier to simply put these types of loads on a small curtainside or stakebody, something with greater maneuverability.

In the end, I survived. The loads will still get where they need to be.

Bonus: I pushed off the dentist till Thursday.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

I must say that I am in awe. When you posted the schedule, I could not even fathom driving a vehicle that large in NYC let alone making those drops in NYC in that amount of time. Maybe I'll get there some day, but it seems to be beyond a skill set I can imagine for myself at this stage.

The other question I had involves pay. With loads in and out NYC you aren't covering miles at the same rate as 1-90 across the Great Plains. How does Prime compensate you for taking 5 hours to drive 30 miles?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar
I could not even fathom driving a vehicle that large in NYC

When I was training, in speaking of close-quarter maneuvering I would tell my students "take all the room you have." That is a super important tip that you must constantly remind yourself to do until it becomes second nature. When approaching an intersection, you need to be looking well in advance at the approach, attack, and execution of the turn. This may mean starting a couple hundred yards early by fading over into two lanes, or even into opposing lanes. Then you must use every inch of available space to get your truck and trailer around that turn. Once you're in that intersection, you own it. It's yours, and everyone else has to give way.

How does Prime compensate you for taking 5 hours to drive 30 miles?

With the admiration and respect of my dispatcher and peers.

rofl-1.gif

Seriously, the compensation for these loads comes mostly in the form of continued autonomy. They don't bother me, they give me what I want, I get choice loads nearly all the time. Unfortunately, these crap loads come from time to time, and someone has to do them.

Aside from that, I'll get $50 for each load that passes in or through nyc. In this case I'll get $150 nyc pay. Additionally, I'll get $25 stop pay for each drop after the first, so another $100.

The pay is hardly worth the hassle. But I never focus on the pay. Like I said, someone has to do it.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I could not even fathom driving a vehicle that large in NYC

double-quotes-end.png

When I was training, in speaking of close-quarter maneuvering I would tell my students "take all the room you have." That is a super important tip that you must constantly remind yourself to do until it becomes second nature. When approaching an intersection, you need to be looking well in advance at the approach, attack, and execution of the turn. This may mean starting a couple hundred yards early by fading over into two lanes, or even into opposing lanes. Then you must use every inch of available space to get your truck and trailer around that turn. Once you're in that intersection, you own it. It's yours, and everyone else has to give way.

double-quotes-start.png

How does Prime compensate you for taking 5 hours to drive 30 miles?

double-quotes-end.png

With the admiration and respect of my dispatcher and peers.

rofl-1.gif

Seriously, the compensation for these loads comes mostly in the form of continued autonomy. They don't bother me, they give me what I want, I get choice loads nearly all the time. Unfortunately, these crap loads come from time to time, and someone has to do them.

Aside from that, I'll get $50 for each load that passes in or through nyc. In this case I'll get $150 nyc pay. Additionally I'll get $25 stop pay for each drop after the first, so another $100.

The pay is hardly work the hassle. But I never focus on the pay. Like I said it, someone has to do it.

That's how I was taught.

"That's all your space, use it. If they're in your space they have to move. Don't let anybody dictate what you do."

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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