Realistic Beginner Driver Pay For Regional Drivers

Topic 26470 | Page 1

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John M.'s Comment
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What is a realistic yearly gross income expectation for a beginner driver (first job after getting CDL) doing regional routes with time at home on weekends with the family? I live near Asheville, North Carolina. I see ads for trucking jobs promising over $60,000 or $70,000+.

Thanks, Waylon Mopshins

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome John, your asking a very generic question. A big factor is the type of freight your hauling. Another is the companies procedure for running regional. Some companies do out and back and others develop a customer base to keep their trucks running in somewhat a big circle. Typically OTR will make more, but not always. I ran a regional at one time that I got as many miles as OTR drivers got because of the customer profile. I’ve seen some regional gigs that got very few miles. Normally pay is mileage based. If I was looking into a regional gig I would find out how the company manages the typical route and the pay scale for it and go from there.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

I did about $48k my first year out. Ran flatbed for McElroy, home every weekend. That is in Texas. Different locations can make a difference even within the same company.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey John, a realistic expectation is $40,000 to $45,000. That's going to improve as you improve, but those are realistic numbers for your first year out here. It takes three or four years to really get the hang of managing everything in this career, but usually once a person has been out here five years they can earn $60,000 plus.

Remember, trucking pay is performance based. We don't have salaries. We get paid for what we produce. Some folks are really geared toward that type of pay. As a driver improves his time management practices, and his understanding of the dynamics involved, he can earn a very decent paycheck out here.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the reality check. I really appreciate all of your responses. That was very helpful. I’ve just got a local job offer (not a trucking job) with a salary just over $40,000. I think I’ll do it for a year and maybe come back to the trucking idea if I’m not diggin’ it.

If I went the trucking route right now, I would have to go the paid CDL route (such as with Roehl) since I don’t have the savings to cover paying for my own schooling right now. I’m afraid to make that kind of a commitment if it turns out to be too hard on my family. I do think the trucker lifestyle would fit my personality. I’m sure I would like it better than the job I’m about to take, but I just wish it paid enough more so that I could justify it with my wife who would be stuck wrangling our twin boys alone when she’s not at work herself.

Thanks again, John

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

John replied...

Thanks for the reality check. I really appreciate all of your responses. That was very helpful. I’ve just got a local job offer (not a trucking job) with a salary just over $40,000. I think I’ll do it for a year and maybe come back to the trucking idea if I’m not diggin’ it.

If I went the trucking route right now, I would have to go the paid CDL route (such as with Roehl) since I don’t have the savings to cover paying for my own schooling right now. I’m afraid to make that kind of a commitment if it turns out to be too hard on my family. I do think the trucker lifestyle would fit my personality. I’m sure I would like it better than the job I’m about to take, but I just wish it paid enough more so that I could justify it with my wife who would be stuck wrangling our twin boys alone when she’s not at work herself.

Thanks again, John

John, 40k the first year is an average. Second year, any trucker worth their weight in salt is capable of topping 60k. Most of the experienced drivers on this forum make over 70k annually. Does the non-driving job you are contemplating, offer an upside of 50% second and third year.

I’ve seen people do the exact same thing you are doing, only to kick themselves a year later for prolonging their agony and limiting earning potential.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
John M.'s Comment
member avatar

Ha ha. Oh boy, you’re reeling me back in. No offense, but is there anyone else out there that can back up what G-town is saying (someone that isn’t a moderator, recruiter or looking for a referral bonus)? I’m specifically asking about regional trucking jobs that would have me home on the weekends. I live near Asheville, NC.

The more independent voices, the better. I really am on the fence and I need to make a decision soon. Thanks!

John

John replied...

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks for the reality check. I really appreciate all of your responses. That was very helpful. I’ve just got a local job offer (not a trucking job) with a salary just over $40,000. I think I’ll do it for a year and maybe come back to the trucking idea if I’m not diggin’ it.

If I went the trucking route right now, I would have to go the paid CDL route (such as with Roehl) since I don’t have the savings to cover paying for my own schooling right now. I’m afraid to make that kind of a commitment if it turns out to be too hard on my family. I do think the trucker lifestyle would fit my personality. I’m sure I would like it better than the job I’m about to take, but I just wish it paid enough more so that I could justify it with my wife who would be stuck wrangling our twin boys alone when she’s not at work herself.

Thanks again, John

double-quotes-end.png

John, 40k the first year is an average. Second year, any trucker worth their weight in salt is capable of topping 60k. Most of the experienced drivers on this forum make over 70k annually. Does the non-driving job you are contemplating, offer an upside of 50% second and third year.

I’ve seen people do the exact same thing you are doing, only to kick themselves a year later for prolonging their agony and limiting earning potential.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Gtown, other moderators and all others that engage in this forum do it for the sake of helping others get started and survive their first year. We all volunteer our time. We are against referral bonuses because many times someone will feed someone a load of BS just to get some extra cash through referral bonus. Stick around and you will not see us trying to do that and posts that do try will quickly be deleted.

Everything you've been told is 100% accurate and information we all stand by.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hey John... pardon me but WTF do you think I am here for?

Try writing another response..,more respectful.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I started in mid January, and was with a trainer until 3/22.

My check stub as of 9/6

I am hourly, northeast regional , home on weekends.

0204473001567726171.jpg

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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