Asking For Advice For My Situation, Especially From Experienced Drivers

Topic 26752 | Page 2

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Moe's Comment
member avatar

Finger joint grease and a hi speed internet connection has dug up....

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0035LMGQC/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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I should add that we are using 28 foot pup trailers not 53s. Do you think I should look at getting a diecast with a pup trailer for best simulation?

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Yes if you can find one.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

That'll do...assuming you can disconnect the end unit. Yup.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

You're probably just overthinking it. I had the same problem. I was taught there are only 2 questions you need to ask yourself.

1) Do I see what I have to see?

I ask this during my set up. I need to see what I'm angling for in at least one mirror and adjust from there.

2) which do I want the trailer to go?

I stop and ask myself before I start going in reverse. It's easy to let car instincts take over and go the wrong way.

And then I go back to seeing what I have to see. In real life situations you won't always see everything and you have to GOAL, but for the test GOALs are limited so you have to do your best to see everything from the mirror.

Pullups are also very important. When you do a pull-up instincts tell you to pull away from the danger and that's wrong. You have to steer towards it. If you're too close to the driver side, steer towards the driver side while pulling up to swing your trailer right. If you're too close to the passenger side steer right to swing your trailer left.

If you can do a proper pull-up you'll have no problems passing the state exam.

Slowing down is key. Everytime I struggled it's because I was going to fast. You're license won't say Moses completed the test in x minutes with x pullups. It'll just say CDL A.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Stressful indeed. Sorry, I feel your pain.

The best advice I can give is to take a deep breath, clear your mind. Think of it as a puzzle to be solved.

Ask yourself: "Which way to I want the back of the trailer to go?" Then turn the opposite. "which way do I want the front of the trailer to go?" then turn the same way.

Some trainers will say "turn toward the problem" which did not click in my head because I always saw two problems, the back and the front were both "problems" and going opposite directions. LOL

When you pull forward, pull as far up as possible. The more room you have the better.

Creep back slowly. It is way easier to go slow and do it right than to go too fast and not know how to correct it.

The parallel is half the offset, if you can do one, you can do the other.

When doing the offset, and you get to the 45 degree angle, turn hard when your trailer tandems intersect with the "imaginary extension of the white line". When doing the parallel, and the white line is in between the tandem tires, turn hard.

Go to a truck stop and watch people. Look at where the tandems are when they start to turn.

If you fail, it isn't the end of the world as you said. Would a training company take you? Yes, and you would need to sign a contract and go through the schooling program (which would take a couple weeks). It may be best for you cause look at Marc Lee. With a CDL , the company may give you a skills test, and if you can't pass it, you could get sent home. Going without a CDL may be a better option.

I also understand that you are worried about money. Roehl pays drivers while in cdl school which i think lasts 2 to 3 weeks. Last i saw, it was $500 per week in training. Please ask if need be, do not rely on me cause companies change all the time. Prime will advance $200 per week for food, before testing, which you pay back at $25 per week once you get your CDL. Most companies will provide hotel, transportation, food or some sort of combination thereof.

Not sure if any other companies pay or advance money during school.

Good luck.. and we are here to vent. You CAN do this... you watched my video of me failing backing once and the road test twice. Yet here i am. In 3 years, no one will ask how you did on the test.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Also watch other people do it from behind and watch what happens with the trailer in relation to what the truck does.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

its alright man, ill take what input i can get at this point lol. AS for watching others back and such at the test site, that is a no go, Oregon does not allow us to watch others testing at the test site. We have to stay in our cars turn AWAY from the test area. Kind of stupid I know , but it is what it is.

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Not an experienced driver take it or leave it. When I was getting ready to test 2 weeks ago my trainer and I were doing a reset. Went 2 days without backing or driving before test. Was very nervous about not practicing immediately before. I stood out on the lot and watched others practicing and testing for 2 days and watched every point they made. And also noted every mistake. Those are just as important because to know how to correct can save a potential fail. Also helpful in real world backing situations. Best of luck I know the pressures you are under was just there. Relax alot. Maybe just a valuable ask those who just passed.

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How can they stop you from going on your own time to watch people test? Try it.

With a pup, setup is easier but backing is HARDER than with a 53. You end up chasing a pup but guiding a 53.

Do very small corrections with a pup. It's EASY to overcorrect.

I would not rent a UHaul and trailer. It will screw with your muscle memory. The suggestion of getting a model tractor trailer and watching how that works is good.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Any truck stops nearby? Great place to observe drivers backing skills, or lack of, that you can watch kind of up close.

Moe's Comment
member avatar

Well Oregon has three testing sites in the area. 1 is about an hour easy from me, another is 30 minutes and another about 20. So far we have been testing at the site that is over an hour away. So figure gas plus I have no idea when others test outside of my class and we haven't been given our re test dates yet.

Also , state of Oregon is VERY clear about folks going out to watch others test and after this last test all three of the local area testers know my face and school by now.

So yea , that would be a no go boss. There are truck stood near me and I can make time this week/weekend to go observe backing, never thought of that idea..

I also ordered a die cast tractor worn 2i foot pup trailer from amazon today which should be here tommorrow so I will be spending time on that as well.

double-quotes-start.png

its alright man, ill take what input i can get at this point lol. AS for watching others back and such at the test site, that is a no go, Oregon does not allow us to watch others testing at the test site. We have to stay in our cars turn AWAY from the test area. Kind of stupid I know , but it is what it is.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Not an experienced driver take it or leave it. When I was getting ready to test 2 weeks ago my trainer and I were doing a reset. Went 2 days without backing or driving before test. Was very nervous about not practicing immediately before. I stood out on the lot and watched others practicing and testing for 2 days and watched every point they made. And also noted every mistake. Those are just as important because to know how to correct can save a potential fail. Also helpful in real world backing situations. Best of luck I know the pressures you are under was just there. Relax alot. Maybe just a valuable ask those who just passed.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

How can they stop you from going on your own time to watch people test? Try it.

With a pup, setup is easier but backing is HARDER than with a 53. You end up chasing a pup but guiding a 53.

Do very small corrections with a pup. It's EASY to overcorrect.

I would not rent a UHaul and trailer. It will screw with your muscle memory. The suggestion of getting a model tractor trailer and watching how that works is good.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Moe's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for your faith in those of us who are putting forth the genuine effort (key words genuine effort, I know you can tell the difference). When I get out on the road , we need to do a forum meet up and dinner is on me.

Ah if I may say in good jest - no its not a date, it's a thank you dinner LOL. I had fun watching your video earlier about romance on the road fun stuff.

So today I ordered a die cast pup trailer and tractor from Amazon and I will spend time on that. I also have the American trucking simulator on my PC , beleive it or not it has helped me on my drives when I drive the rigs and trailers at school. Helps me understand better how things maneuver, not the same as real life but there are good elements to trucking life to it.

You have to deliver in deadlines, keep within speed and truck speed limits , fuel costs and savings, route and trip planning, hour of service violations (actually called drive whole tired penalties) etc.

It's not real life for sure but it helps prepare you and I better figured out how to take those wide right turns without curbing lol.

Thanks again

I'll keep the forum posted in my progress....

Stressful indeed. Sorry, I feel your pain.

The best advice I can give is to take a deep breath, clear your mind. Think of it as a puzzle to be solved.

Ask yourself: "Which way to I want the back of the trailer to go?" Then turn the opposite. "which way do I want the front of the trailer to go?" then turn the same way.

Some trainers will say "turn toward the problem" which did not click in my head because I always saw two problems, the back and the front were both "problems" and going opposite directions. LOL

When you pull forward, pull as far up as possible. The more room you have the better.

Creep back slowly. It is way easier to go slow and do it right than to go too fast and not know how to correct it.

The parallel is half the offset, if you can do one, you can do the other.

When doing the offset, and you get to the 45 degree angle, turn hard when your trailer tandems intersect with the "imaginary extension of the white line". When doing the parallel, and the white line is in between the tandem tires, turn hard.

Go to a truck stop and watch people. Look at where the tandems are when they start to turn.

If you fail, it isn't the end of the world as you said. Would a training company take you? Yes, and you would need to sign a contract and go through the schooling program (which would take a couple weeks). It may be best for you cause look at Marc Lee. With a CDL , the company may give you a skills test, and if you can't pass it, you could get sent home. Going without a CDL may be a better option.

I also understand that you are worried about money. Roehl pays drivers while in cdl school which i think lasts 2 to 3 weeks. Last i saw, it was $500 per week in training. Please ask if need be, do not rely on me cause companies change all the time. Prime will advance $200 per week for food, before testing, which you pay back at $25 per week once you get your CDL. Most companies will provide hotel, transportation, food or some sort of combination thereof.

Not sure if any other companies pay or advance money during school.

Good luck.. and we are here to vent. You CAN do this... you watched my video of me failing backing once and the road test twice. Yet here i am. In 3 years, no one will ask how you did on the test.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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