Am I Out Of Line To Expect Decent Equipment When Paying Almost 7000 At CDL School?

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Amber L.'s Comment
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Ugh, this school has been really great. And I have been in several trucks that are just fine, older but in good working order. Now my group has been assigned a truck that every student and even one instructor admitted is a piece of crap. The transmission has obviously seen too much hard student usage. I was able to drive it okay most of the time and I know I will get better at it with practice but because this is the truck that I will drive almost exclusively it makes sense to test on it as it will be the one I know best.

I'm wondering if I need a reality check about expecting better equipment. All the other equipment has been great but this truck is below what I thought made sense. It seems like it should be a truck that is there if the others are needed for something else but not one that is actually assigned to students.

I'm hoping you all can give me a reality check that it is okay and if I can drive that truck I can drive anything. I just don't want to mess up my test due to driving a truck that is extra hard to drive, it's hard enough it feels like without the extra barrier of a difficult to drive truck.

Thanks everyone I do want to say I'm not trying to not take responsibility for my ability to drive just wondering if I should feel so disappoint that I have one more hurdle to jump.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Amber L.'s Comment
member avatar

I do want to say I think the instructor will let me come in on the weekend, as long as one instructor is willing to come in, and drive one of the other trucks so I have a feel for it and can test on it rather than this crappy one. So it's not the end of the world just feel sort of jipped and wondering if that is valid feeling. Ok Thank you so much for this site and support I feel so much more prepared for the industry than a lot of my classmates. I am telling them about TT but not sure many have bothered to look it up.

Old School's Comment
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Amber, if anything is out of line it's the price you're paying to get your CDL. That's twice what most private schools charge.

You've been here with us for a little while. I know you've noticed our bias toward the Paid CDL Training Programs. Now you are realizing one of the many reasons we recommend those programs. They teach you on the very equipment you'll be driving for the job. It's all up to date and well maintained. They are focused on obtaining drivers for their team. Private schools are focused on something else.

Your concerns are something we hear often here. Private schools struggle with cash flow. One of the easiest ways for them to cut back on expenses is to keep older equipment and not maintain it properly. It just comes with the territory.

Hang in there. It will all be in your past soon enough. Don't let it be too big a concern. Once you've got that CDL it won't have any indication on it that says you tested out in a junky old relic. It will just say commercial driver. At that point you'll be working like crazy just to prove you're capable of doing this job.

A Commencement Speech For Truck Driving School Graduates

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Amber L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks old School I needed to hear that

I knew it was on the upper end but they do have a 350acre campus with a mile and a quarter private hwy so you can learn to shift without the worry of traffic. Money wasn't a big issue for us and we thought the private hwy would be worth the trade off of having a guaranteed job because we have clean records and clean driving records, and being a husband/wife team we kept being told we would be slightly more sought after.

Like you said I just have to focus on the goal of getting my CDL a very obtainable goal it feels like. I've always been lucky to be a person who just gets it never had to study overmuch in school. I was upshifting fairly smoothly and the instructors were saying my straight back is nearly perfect (haven't tried any other maneuvers yet). Down shifting was the hardest but I think I figured out that I was thinking of a ten speed and driving an eight speed so we'll see how it goes today. So it all seems to be coming to me fairly well just practice, practice, practice now.

Thanks for the support!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

It sounds like you're doing well. Just stay the course. I can't wait to give you the dancing bananas award - I know you're gonna get there!

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

When I was in school the first truck we drove was a 94 with over a million miles, they did that because it's cheaper to repair than a newer truck with all the electronics on it. After you proved you could shift and drive that dinosaur you where moved into the nicer truck which definitely shifted better since it didn't get the abuse the other one did.

Good luck

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

$7000..sure hope that's for both of you. If not $14K...yeesh. when I went to CDL school I believe the freshest truck had 900,000 plus and the others had 1.1 million or more. For the few weeks you need them they serve their purpose. Hang in their, once licensed and working you should have much better equipment.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Superlejera's Comment
member avatar

When I was in school the first truck we drove was a 94 with over a million miles, they did that because it's cheaper to repair than a newer truck with all the electronics on it. After you proved you could shift and drive that dinosaur you where moved into the nicer truck which definitely shifted better since it didn't get the abuse the other one did.

Good luck

Hey

When I was in school the first truck we drove was a 94 with over a million miles, they did that because it's cheaper to repair than a newer truck with all the electronics on it. After you proved you could shift and drive that dinosaur you where moved into the nicer truck which definitely shifted better since it didn't get the abuse the other one did.

Good luck

Hey Bobcat_Bob any chance you can give me information about your company I’m doing over the road now I’m looking to find something local to be more with my family .im from Connecticut . I would like to know how they pay by the mile percentage or hours thank you

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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My first trainer told me he paid &13k at NTTS. Maybe that’s why he had a problem with me, Ipaid around $5K at Sage.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Superlejera, you'd have to choose between P&D which is going out to customers and linehaul which mostly runs at night you would go to different terminals and then come back ( maybe east coast may require you to stay in hotel).

I started 2 years ago at 55 cpm and am at 69 cpm now, hourly starts at $25 a hour and gets a 6, 12 and 24 month raise I am at $30.50 a hour now if I'm ever on the clock.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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