Going Great With Crete So Far

Topic 26849 | Page 12

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Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

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Im curious..... Forget miles. Whats your average daily drive time/on duty time in the 8 day period?

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My Average daily drive time is a little over 8 hours, some days more, some days less. But that's the average. My on duty average ranges, as some days I'm only on duty less then an hour(on duty not driving), other days I was on duty for over 2 hours. That was mostly me forgetting to change my stutus due to a bad habit I developed when I was on a local account.

I do the same. I go off duty when i get to a shipper or reciever and go check in then on duty yard move to get to the door. Then off duty and always forget to go on duty loading/unloading for a short time. Then when i remember and switch to on duty i forgot to go back off duty. Probably do that twice a week.

Im curious though do you still run on short days? With those hours im sure you end up with like a 4 or 5 hour day coming back to you. On those days do you do a reset?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar
Im curious though do you still run on short days? With those hours im sure you end up with like a 4 or 5 hour day coming back to you. On those days do you do a reset?

I generally like to do a reset once a week basically, it allows me to catch up on sleep and things like that. Everyone does things differently, but thats how I like to do it.

On the topic regarding my miles, I have actually driven 3000 miles in a single week but the last load fell into another pay period so I don't consider it a 3000 mile week. Like this week for example my reset will be over tomorrow night with 2250 or so miles for this week and my next load is a little over 1600 miles but it will deliver after the end of the pay period(Friday at midnight).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Cece's Comment
member avatar

Okay makes more sense. I'm sure I'll understand better when I'm out there. Are Resets a bad thing? Or just you try not to do them so you can keep turning miles?

It's not about miles, it's about the 70 hour clock we have to use in 8 days.

If you use 8 3/4 hours every day, you'll never need a reset.

Resets are not required, unless you run out of hours. After 8 consecutive days, you get the hours back from 9 days ago.

Past 3 days in a row, I have driven between 477 and 491 miles each day, using between 8.1 and 8.3 hours each day.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Okay makes more sense. I'm sure I'll understand better when I'm out there. Are Resets a bad thing? Or just you try not to do them so you can keep turning miles?

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It's not about miles, it's about the 70 hour clock we have to use in 8 days.

If you use 8 3/4 hours every day, you'll never need a reset.

Resets are not required, unless you run out of hours. After 8 consecutive days, you get the hours back from 9 days ago.

Past 3 days in a row, I have driven between 477 and 491 miles each day, using between 8.1 and 8.3 hours each day.

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It's really up to each driver, some drivers like to run off recaps and others like to reset. You can generally run the same amount of miles and still do a reset.

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

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Im curious though do you still run on short days? With those hours im sure you end up with like a 4 or 5 hour day coming back to you. On those days do you do a reset?

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I generally like to do a reset once a week basically, it allows me to catch up on sleep and things like that. Everyone does things differently, but thats how I like to do it.

On the topic regarding my miles, I have actually driven 3000 miles in a single week but the last load fell into another pay period so I don't consider it a 3000 mile week. Like this week for example my reset will be over tomorrow night with 2250 or so miles for this week and my next load is a little over 1600 miles but it will deliver after the end of the pay period(Friday at midnight).

Im not knocking resets just curious. I have friends who do the same every week they reset and others who run recaps like i do. My dispatcher is the same i had as a trainee and he doesn't seem to be a fan of resets. I guess because Ive never done one im curious and have questions. I also rarely get preplanned and i think that contributes..... My dispatcher can see my hours and sets me up accordingly although that can suck when the "no freight" message pops up. Or the you're #4 on the list message comes up.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

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Im curious though do you still run on short days? With those hours im sure you end up with like a 4 or 5 hour day coming back to you. On those days do you do a reset?

double-quotes-end.png

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I generally like to do a reset once a week basically, it allows me to catch up on sleep and things like that. Everyone does things differently, but thats how I like to do it.

On the topic regarding my miles, I have actually driven 3000 miles in a single week but the last load fell into another pay period so I don't consider it a 3000 mile week. Like this week for example my reset will be over tomorrow night with 2250 or so miles for this week and my next load is a little over 1600 miles but it will deliver after the end of the pay period(Friday at midnight).

double-quotes-end.png

Im not knocking resets just curious. I have friends who do the same every week they reset and others who run recaps like i do. My dispatcher is the same i had as a trainee and he doesn't seem to be a fan of resets. I guess because Ive never done one im curious and have questions. I also rarely get preplanned and i think that contributes..... My dispatcher can see my hours and sets me up accordingly although that can suck when the "no freight" message pops up. Or the you're #4 on the list message comes up.

Yeah everyone can handle it their own way, run recaps or reset whatever fits you best. I had that problem when I was with schneider, I always ended up in dead freight zones they called them and I would end up sitting around longer then I wanted to. Sometimes I would have to wait a few extra hours for a load, sometimes I got a load right as I got to the customer, other times I would end up taking a 10 hour break early. Maybe it was me, or maybe I really was in a dead freight zone.

Regardless, that didn't happen all the time but it did happen quite a bit the last few months before I went local with schneider. But I have since left schneider on good terms, and went to Crete and have been loving it so far. Since I got my own truck, I have been preplanned a day before I even made my delivery. Like today, I was preplanned before I even left the customer to go to my parking location for tomorrow night.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Noob / Wannabe Alert!

I can see both sides to Recaps and Resets.

Does how a company / account runs make a difference? I can see (have seen, I think) Drivers who couldn't take a load due to needing a reset but can't you also wind up needing 9-11 hours of driving time and not have it without having done a reset?

Also... how do new ELOGS (vs. older EBORD system?) come into play? My JB Hunt trainer focused on teaching "driveline maximization". He would go on duty when entering the driveway to yard (before guard shack) and mentioned others did it in the intersection / @ red light BEFORE the turn onto the street where yard entrance is. I believe newer systems will now put you back on the drive line for that.

(I'll take my answers off-line!)

Thanks!

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Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Noob_Driver's Comment
member avatar

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Im curious though do you still run on short days? With those hours im sure you end up with like a 4 or 5 hour day coming back to you. On those days do you do a reset?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

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I generally like to do a reset once a week basically, it allows me to catch up on sleep and things like that. Everyone does things differently, but thats how I like to do it.

On the topic regarding my miles, I have actually driven 3000 miles in a single week but the last load fell into another pay period so I don't consider it a 3000 mile week. Like this week for example my reset will be over tomorrow night with 2250 or so miles for this week and my next load is a little over 1600 miles but it will deliver after the end of the pay period(Friday at midnight).

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Im not knocking resets just curious. I have friends who do the same every week they reset and others who run recaps like i do. My dispatcher is the same i had as a trainee and he doesn't seem to be a fan of resets. I guess because Ive never done one im curious and have questions. I also rarely get preplanned and i think that contributes..... My dispatcher can see my hours and sets me up accordingly although that can suck when the "no freight" message pops up. Or the you're #4 on the list message comes up.

double-quotes-end.png

Yeah everyone can handle it their own way, run recaps or reset whatever fits you best. I had that problem when I was with schneider, I always ended up in dead freight zones they called them and I would end up sitting around longer then I wanted to. Sometimes I would have to wait a few extra hours for a load, sometimes I got a load right as I got to the customer, other times I would end up taking a 10 hour break early. Maybe it was me, or maybe I really was in a dead freight zone.

Regardless, that didn't happen all the time but it did happen quite a bit the last few months before I went local with schneider. But I have since left schneider on good terms, and went to Crete and have been loving it so far. Since I got my own truck, I have been preplanned a day before I even made my delivery. Like today, I was preplanned before I even left the customer to go to my parking location for tomorrow night.

You dont miss the heart pounding excitement of waiting for a message from dispatch while acting like your having a hard time closing your doors or sliding tandems after getting unloaded while the shipping guy gives you dirty looks because he wants you off the property ASAP and the closest truck stop is a 30 spot in city pilot filled with day cabs and drop trailers?

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

You dont miss the heart pounding excitement of waiting for a message from dispatch while acting like your having a hard time closing your doors or sliding tandems after getting unloaded while the shipping guy gives you dirty looks because he wants you off the property ASAP and the closest truck stop is a 30 spot in city pilot filled with day cabs and drop trailers?

I cannot say that I do! shocked.png

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Can someone explain to me the rookie who is still waiting on orientation and training what the average miles someone should have before a reset or will I learn that in training. I'm sorta confused on everyone is asking Jaime why he had to do a reset already ?? Help my rookie brain understand lol.

Coming from a driver that doesnt drive more than 2500 a week (usually around 2000)due to the nature of my job this is my thinking. For trip planning people usually use 55 mph. I'll just estimate that of the 70 hours available to drive, 60 are used for driving. The other 10 are pre/post trip, fueling, and checking in at customers. So 60 hours at 55 mph is 3300 miles. Depending on the terrain, where you are in the US and time of day you're going through cities will fluctuate that number quite a bit. I've done one of our routes that is 678 miles and made it back with less than 5 miles on my 11 drive clock. That was running 70 mph for nearly the entire time and leaving at 11pm. You wont be able to do that on the east coast or out west in the mountains. The way most drivers preserve their 70 hour clock to maximize the amount of time they can drive is to log the bare minimum at customers. About 5 minutes to check in/out, then go off duty/sleeper. Drivers have a preference about whether they do a reset or run off recaps. Personally I like the idea of resets to get a break. If I was OTR I would use that opportunity to sleep, do laundry and explore the area I'm in. Some dispatchers also prefer you run a certain way so they know exactly what you're doing so they can better plan your loads. I forget, when does orientation start and who did you decide to go with?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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