Going Great With Crete So Far

Topic 26849 | Page 13

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Also... how do new ELOGS (vs. older EBORD system?) come into play? My JB Hunt trainer focused on teaching "driveline maximization". He would go on duty when entering the driveway to yard (before guard shack) and mentioned others did it in the intersection / @ red light BEFORE the turn onto the street where yard entrance is. I believe newer systems will now put you back on the drive line for that.

Our system is configured that if the truck goes over 5 mph it trips to drive line. My company will allow us to log "On Duty - Yard Move" if we are at one our 3 gated terminals. Logging Yard move still takes away from the 70, but on our daily 11/14 it takes away from the 14 rather than the 11 driving. With our system, if we go over 20 mph it automatically kicks us to drive, taking away from our 11 drive clock.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Also... how do new ELOGS (vs. older EBORD system?) come into play? My JB Hunt trainer focused on teaching "driveline maximization". He would go on duty when entering the driveway to yard (before guard shack) and mentioned others did it in the intersection / @ red light BEFORE the turn onto the street where yard entrance is. I believe newer systems will now put you back on the drive line for that.

double-quotes-end.png

Our system is configured that if the truck goes over 5 mph it trips to drive line. My company will allow us to log "On Duty - Yard Move" if we are at one our 3 gated terminals. Logging Yard move still takes away from the 70, but on our daily 11/14 it takes away from the 14 rather than the 11 driving. With our system, if we go over 20 mph it automatically kicks us to drive, taking away from our 11 drive clock.

To expand on that this is what I typically do. Due to tractor and trailer being parked in different areas of the yard as I approach my tractor I do a quick walk around. I log into my ELD and immediately go to "On Duty - Yard Move" under comments I put Hooking Up (giggity). After I am attached to my trailer I switch over to "On Duty" and begin logging my pretrip. I manually switch to "drive" just as I leave the gate. When I get back to the yard if I'm close to my 14 or 11 drive clock I will pull in the gate and immediately go back to On Duty-Yard move. I will then go to my assigned spot and then go "On Duty" and log my post trip while disconnecting my trailer. After done I'll once again log Yard Move and under comments "park tractor " and park my tractor in its designated spot. My situation is different than an OTR driver due to slip seating trucks/trailers daily but seems like it's similar to what JB was like.

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
But over all I'm fine with the miles I'm driving now, it provides more then enough income to support my wife and I, for weeks I want to run hard, I will. Otherwise it'll be like it is now, where I get weeks around 2200-2500. I dont take breaks any longer then i need to, I'm up and ready to drive when my 10 hour break is over.

Sounds like you found your happy place. Hope things continue to go well for you.

Old School's Comment
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over all I'm fine with the miles I'm driving now, it provides more then enough income to support my wife and I
Sounds like you found your happy place.

Jamie, this is not meant to be critical. It's also just a generalization about the trucking business, meant for the purpose of educating all of us here.

Trucking is a business. As drivers we are members of a team. The whole team from top level management right on down to the drivers have got to be involved in making the business successful. How is it that trucking companies become successful? By maximizing utilization of their assets.

Trust me, some group of people in the offices are measuring each of us. They have charts and graphs measuring every little detail of our performance. They know exactly how much revenue we produce, how much fuel we use, what percentage of our 70 hour clock we use each week and the ratio of drive time in relation to on duty time we spend. All of this relates to the concept you hear us talk of when we say trucking is competitive.

Somewhere down the line a trucker who is content to earn just enough to satisfy him and his wife's meager desires is going to find himself on the low priority list. What happens to low priority people? I don't know personally, because I've never been in that category. I don't want to be. I'm pretty sure they are the ones in the driver lounges complaining that their miles are dropping off and they keep sitting in "dead freight" zones.

Drivers should always push to advance the purpose of the team. That means push yourselves to be more productive. Jamie has gotten dissatisfied twice now and tried something new. I'm not the judge, and it's understandable wanting to try something different. I'm just gonna say the folks who constantly push themselves to improve their performance rarely get dissatisfied and start coming up with reasons why they want to move on. They're motivated by their unreached goals.

It's very important out here to keep yourself at the top if you want to sustain your effectiveness and satisfaction in this business.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Jeremy's Comment
member avatar

I certainly didnt mean to knock you and im sorry if i came off that way i was more feeling concerned for you but if what you have goin on is right where you wanna be then id say you found a good home i know a few who work northeast regional with crete they love the job get home weekends and get great miles as far as the resets previously as a northeast regional guy i had resets every weekend and would never have wanted to do recaps for me i think resets are what can help keep truckers human id much rather bang out 5 11-14 hour shifts and take some real time for myself but i know for otr peeps thats not always an option they have available

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

Picked up this reefer load yesterday, drop and hook , turned into live load, currently about 750 miles away. I'm one day ahead, dispatch is currently in works of getting the appointment moved up. Because the load was orginally supposed to deliver on 11/10 at 13:00.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I'm one day ahead, dispatch is currently in works of getting the appointment moved up.

That's great Jamie! Is the appointment change something you requested of your dispatcher? Or is it something the dispatcher recognized and took his own initiative? I'm just curious. Either way it's a good thing.

By moving appointments up like that you're accomplishing the very thing I mentioned earlier concerning being successful at trucking. A key element to making money in trucking is maximizing utilization of our asset (the truck) by using a high percentage of our 70 hours each week for productivity.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Jamie's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm one day ahead, dispatch is currently in works of getting the appointment moved up.

double-quotes-end.png

That's great Jamie! Is the appointment change something you requested of your dispatcher? Or is it something the dispatcher recognized and took his own initiative? I'm just curious. Either way it's a good thing.

By moving appointments up like that you're accomplishing the very thing I mentioned earlier concerning being successful at trucking. A key element to making money in trucking is maximizing utilization of our asset (the truck) by using a high percentage of our 70 hours each week for productivity.

I requested the appointment be moved up yesterday morning when I stopped for my 10 hour break, and figured I'd get there by 21:00 tonight which I'm still on track. Thankfully they did get the appointment moved for tonight instead of tomorrow! I am also already preplanned for another load that will take me through the weekend.

I'm currently 120 miles away, drove over night about 600 miles to stay on track. smile.gif

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar
Thankfully they did get the appointment moved for tonight instead of tomorrow! I am also already preplanned for another load that will take me through the weekend.

I'm thinking that in another 6 months you will be "Jamie (Crete biggest fan)"

Great to hear you're doing well.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I'm currently 120 miles away, drove over night about 600 miles to stay on track.

Nice! I like that approach.

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