Linehaul Pay Stub

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Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I've seen a few pay stubs for OTR and regional drivers but none for linehaul so I thought I'd toss one of mine out there incase somebody was wondering about switching to or starting with linehaul.

OTR is not the only option when it comes to trucking although it is a great place to start and opens many doors should you decideyou do not want to be away from home everynight. I'm off Sunday and Monday plus I'm home every night ( weather permitting).

0749971001573655035.jpg

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Nice! When it comes to linehaul and you have an assigned run, does you paycheck fluctuate at all? The consistency would be nice but personally I think I'd get bored driving the same route every day and knowing I cant do anything to earn more. When you guys get shutdown for the day by the company or you choose to not run due to weather do they pay you anything or are you required/given choice to use vacation/personal time? I know it may be a different at different companies but curious how Old Dominion handles it.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

All that money probably gets pretty hefty. To ease your burden, I will be happy to take a little bit of it off you.

smile.gif

Thanks for sharing.

Jay G.'s Comment
member avatar

As someone not familiar with all aspects of trucking, can someone breakdown what "linehaul" is and entails?

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

As someone not familiar with all aspects of trucking, can someone breakdown what "linehaul" is and entails?

Linehaul is usually in relation to LTL (less than truckload). We deliver freight that's too big or heavy for your usual residential deliver outlets.

In this field you have 2 separate gigs. 1 is city driver the other is linehaul driver. A city driver makes local deliveries and gets paid hourly. A linehaul driver transports doubles or triples (if legal) from hub to hub and they get mileage pay and task (hook, drop, fuel etc) pay.

These jobs typically require 1 year of experience, but there are exceptions depending on demand. The assignments given in linehaul are based on seniorty. I'm a city driver for FedEx freight with very little seniority. My job is a mixture of dock work and surprise runs. The gross amount on my check is typically 1000 to 1200 and I've only been a couple driver for 3 months. I came in with a permit and no experience.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

I've seen a few pay stubs for OTR and regional drivers but none for linehaul so I thought I'd toss one of mine out there incase somebody was wondering about switching to or starting with linehaul.

OTR is not the only option when it comes to trucking although it is a great place to start and opens many doors should you decideyou do not want to be away from home everynight. I'm off Sunday and Monday plus I'm home every night ( weather permitting).

0749971001573655035.jpg

I wanna be like Bob when I grow up lol. We have 4 linehaul spots opening up soon, I'm hoping I'm lucky enough to snag one.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Jay, most linehaul jobs are the guys you see pulling doubles. It's LTL companies like Old Dominion. They pretty much run a regular route each day, meet up at a designated location, swap trailers and then go back to the terminal. The new guys usually end up on the night shift or sort of a system of being on call which they call the "wild board" or something like that. Seniority is important in most linehaul jobs.

It used to be that they all required experience. but they've loosened up that requirement in recent years. One of the critical things about landing a linehaul job is your location. You must live near their terminal.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
When it comes to linehaul and you have an assigned run, does you paycheck fluctuate at all

It can depend on the run, mine does a lot do not my trainer runs to Des Moines and back and his check only changes by a few dollars depending on how many drop and hooks he has.

When you guys get shutdown for the day by the company or you choose to not run due to weather do they pay you anything or are you required/given choice to use vacation/personal time

We do not get paid unless we use vacation days. Personally I don't unless like in January there are a bunch of days off in a row. I save my vacation for when I want to take off.

As someone not familiar with all aspects of trucking, can someone breakdown what "linehaul" is and entails?

Banks and OS did a good job of explaining it if you have any more questions I'm more than happy to answer.

I wanna be like Bob when I grow up lol. We have 4 linehaul spots opening up soon, I'm hoping I'm lucky enough to snag one.

I hope you get one too, if you do before you know it you will have moved up. In 2 years I went from the bottom to having about 10 people below me now. Hopefully when the new terminal opens I can move up to one of those $120k runs lol

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Andrew J.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow if that’s consistent then that’s a 100k a year job. I’m going on year 2 of otr and i would like to at least be home on the weekends in the future. I live outside Indianapolis and I believe there is a terminal in the west side of town. Maybe I’ll apply. Do you just apply on their website? Or go to the terminal in person?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

Wow if that’s consistent then that’s a 100k a year job. I’m going on year 2 of otr and i would like to at least be home on the weekends in the future. I live outside Indianapolis and I believe there is a terminal in the west side of town. Maybe I’ll apply. Do you just apply on their website? Or go to the terminal in person?

You apply online. I'm my opinion, the best LTL companies are FedEx freight, old Dominion and SAIA.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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