My First Day With My Mentor And Not Sure If I Need To Do More

Topic 27060 | Page 2

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Old School's Comment
member avatar
I was not calling to be a complainer but that I wanted to make sure I got trained completely this time

Victor, look we all understand how this training time is difficult. We've all been there and done that. Look at us, we're the one group of people you look to for advice. Brother, I sometimes wonder if you heed anything we say to you.

You are still fixated on your perception that you weren't trained properly the first time. Now you're still on that same foolish rant. We've insisted that your issues are yours. You didn't G.O.A.L. Do you remember why you are here right now? You didn't do as you should. You thought you knew better. it has nothing to do with your lack of training. It has everything to do with your lack of discipline.

I've gone over this new time for you at Western Express in a previous conversation. I explained to you that you will be team driving. Now look at what you're saying...

it was calmish until he got up from sleeping which I know he needs sleep but I was still wanting him to stay up.

Why? You don't need him holding your hand. You need to practice handling a rig. He can sleep - you're not a permit holder.

Your expectations are killing you.

Western Express took you on as a driver with a little experience. You already know enough to let you team drive with a trainer. All they want to do is evaluate you. If I were the one evaluating you right now, I'd have huge concerns. You already are acting like you know better than them.

At this point my advice would be, "Go along and get along." They are giving you a chance to prove yourself. Yet, you are hell bent on insisting they prove themselves. You are putting yourself into direct conflict by taking this approach. Somebody was willing to take a huge chance on you. You know it's a huge chance when everybody else is saying, "No thanks Victor."

Victor, I trained at Western Express. It was not easy. In fact it could be described as hellish. Guess what? I made a very successful career for myself. I did that. I didn't look to them to do that. I was in a similar situation as you - nobody was willing to hire me. I took the responsibility on myself to make it happen. Was it easy? Heck no, it was extremely challenging. Did my trainer do questionable things? Lots of them. Did that have any negative effect on my career? No.

Victor, you've got about three or four weeks to get this done. That's like a blink of your eye in comparison to a lifelong career. Toughen up man. Own your time driving team. You are going to learn a lot just by driving the truck. Take care, be cautious. Quit blaming everything on your trainer. He doesn't have to give you permission to do a thorough pre-trip inspection. You can get up yourself and do one.

If you don't like the way he's working the clock just think about how you'll do it when you're solo. Quit stressing over the minor details. You keep asking...

what about the hours of service issue? Isnt that like a violation? Would that incident come on me or my trainer?

There's a simple response to the officer. "Sir, I'm in training. He's the one who is managing the Quallcomm at this point." I'm serious. That's the truth, isn't it? Otherwise, you need to stand up for yourself. At this point you don't really have that kind of dynamic working for you, but I'm assuming that is because of your misguided expectations.

Victor, this job is all about personal responsibility. You are the one who must grasp that concept. It's on you to bring yourself into that mindset. You are so focused on making sure everyone else is acting responsibly that you are going to totally screw yourself again. They are giving you a chance to drive with the training wheels still on the bike. What are you doing? You are complaining that the training wheels aren't doing their job properly.

Drive the truck Victor. Focus on being responsible for everything that happens while you are at the wheel. You got the truck stuck. Let me say that again - you got the truck stuck. You have repeatedly blamed that on the trainer. Think about that. Learn from that. Be responsible for your results.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Drive the truck Victor. Focus on being responsible for everything that happens while you are at the wheel. You got the truck stuck. Let me say that again - you got the truck stuck. You have repeatedly blamed that on the trainer. Think about that. Learn from that. Be responsible for your results.

I absolutely agree. When we're the one behind the wheel EVERYTHING that happens is our responsibility whether it ends up the way we intended or not. When I was in training I was asked to do many things I wasnt quite comfortable with. I told my trainer its not happening because my skills are no where near good enough so if that's what he wanted he better jump into the driver seat. Unfortunately your training seems to be starting off on the wrong foot but the good news is that it isnt too late to turn it around.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

What you said is true that my expectations are too high. I just need to look at the situation in the bigger scheme of things.

double-quotes-start.png

I was not calling to be a complainer but that I wanted to make sure I got trained completely this time

double-quotes-end.png

Victor, look we all understand how this training time is difficult. We've all been there and done that. Look at us, we're the one group of people you look to for advice. Brother, I sometimes wonder if you heed anything we say to you.

You are still fixated on your perception that you weren't trained properly the first time. Now you're still on that same foolish rant. We've insisted that your issues are yours. You didn't G.O.A.L. Do you remember why you are here right now? You didn't do as you should. You thought you knew better. it has nothing to do with your lack of training. It has everything to do with your lack of discipline.

I've gone over this new time for you at Western Express in a previous conversation. I explained to you that you will be team driving. Now look at what you're saying...

double-quotes-start.png

it was calmish until he got up from sleeping which I know he needs sleep but I was still wanting him to stay up.

double-quotes-end.png

Why? You don't need him holding your hand. You need to practice handling a rig. He can sleep - you're not a permit holder.

Your expectations are killing you.

Western Express took you on as a driver with a little experience. You already know enough to let you team drive with a trainer. All they want to do is evaluate you. If I were the one evaluating you right now, I'd have huge concerns. You already are acting like you know better than them.

At this point my advice would be, "Go along and get along." They are giving you a chance to prove yourself. Yet, you are hell bent on insisting they prove themselves. You are putting yourself into direct conflict by taking this approach. Somebody was willing to take a huge chance on you. You know it's a huge chance when everybody else is saying, "No thanks Victor."

Victor, I trained at Western Express. It was not easy. In fact it could be described as hellish. Guess what? I made a very successful career for myself. I did that. I didn't look to them to do that. I was in a similar situation as you - nobody was willing to hire me. I took the responsibility on myself to make it happen. Was it easy? Heck no, it was extremely challenging. Did my trainer do questionable things? Lots of them. Did that have any negative effect on my career? No.

Victor, you've got about three or four weeks to get this done. That's like a blink of your eye in comparison to a lifelong career. Toughen up man. Own your time driving team. You are going to learn a lot just by driving the truck. Take care, be cautious. Quit blaming everything on your trainer. He doesn't have to give you permission to do a thorough pre-trip inspection. You can get up yourself and do one.

If you don't like the way he's working the clock just think about how you'll do it when you're solo. Quit stressing over the minor details. You keep asking...

double-quotes-start.png

what about the hours of service issue? Isnt that like a violation? Would that incident come on me or my trainer?

double-quotes-end.png

There's a simple response to the officer. "Sir, I'm in training. He's the one who is managing the Quallcomm at this point." I'm serious. That's the truth, isn't it? Otherwise, you need to stand up for yourself. At this point you don't really have that kind of dynamic working for you, but I'm assuming that is because of your misguided expectations.

Victor, this job is all about personal responsibility. You are the one who must grasp that concept. It's on you to bring yourself into that mindset. You are so focused on making sure everyone else is acting responsibly that you are going to totally screw yourself again. They are giving you a chance to drive with the training wheels still on the bike. What are you doing? You are complaining that the training wheels aren't doing their job properly.

Drive the truck Victor. Focus on being responsible for everything that happens while you are at the wheel. You got the truck stuck. Let me say that again - you got the truck stuck. You have repeatedly blamed that on the trainer. Think about that. Learn from that. Be responsible for your results.

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
I told my trainer its not happening because my skills are no where near good enough so if that's what he wanted he better jump into the driver seat.

to clarify. this is mainly in regards to backing into narrow alleyways blindside downtown very early in my training. I understand that's the way you improve but I was no where near ready at that point. By being put in difficult positions is how we improve.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

I will definitely remember that and I cant wait till we can work it out again hopefully a lot better this time.

double-quotes-start.png

Drive the truck Victor. Focus on being responsible for everything that happens while you are at the wheel. You got the truck stuck. Let me say that again - you got the truck stuck. You have repeatedly blamed that on the trainer. Think about that. Learn from that. Be responsible for your results.

double-quotes-end.png

I absolutely agree. When we're the one behind the wheel EVERYTHING that happens is our responsibility whether it ends up the way we intended or not. When I was in training I was asked to do many things I wasnt quite comfortable with. I told my trainer its not happening because my skills are no where near good enough so if that's what he wanted he better jump into the driver seat. Unfortunately your training seems to be starting off on the wrong foot but the good news is that it isnt too late to turn it around.

double-quotes-start.png

I told my trainer its not happening because my skills are no where near good enough so if that's what he wanted he better jump into the driver seat.

double-quotes-end.png

to clarify. this is mainly in regards to backing into narrow alleyways blindside downtown very early in my training. I understand that's the way you improve but I was no where near ready at that point. By being put in difficult positions is how we improve.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

I wouldn't really worry about your trainer using your time to get unstuck in a parking lot. Remember, if he goes and turns on his time his clock starts and it could ruin the trip.

Now, if he starts driving on the interstate with your time, that's another story.

One suggestion I could make is to try and take time off and get him out of the truck. I always took time off every 2 weeks because training can get overwhelming for both parties and nothing can calm things faster than some time off the truck.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Dually noted definitely, going to remember that. Thanks for your imput.

I wouldn't really worry about your trainer using your time to get unstuck in a parking lot. Remember, if he goes and turns on his time his clock starts and it could ruin the trip.

Now, if he starts driving on the interstate with your time, that's another story.

One suggestion I could make is to try and take time off and get him out of the truck. I always took time off every 2 weeks because training can get overwhelming for both parties and nothing can calm things faster than some time off the truck.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Here is a question, my trainer said to go around the building, I asked him whether I should go around the motel, so would it still be my fault if he wanted me to go around it? Just wondering.

Dually noted definitely, going to remember that. Thanks for your imput.

double-quotes-start.png

I wouldn't really worry about your trainer using your time to get unstuck in a parking lot. Remember, if he goes and turns on his time his clock starts and it could ruin the trip.

Now, if he starts driving on the interstate with your time, that's another story.

One suggestion I could make is to try and take time off and get him out of the truck. I always took time off every 2 weeks because training can get overwhelming for both parties and nothing can calm things faster than some time off the truck.

double-quotes-end.png

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

Never go around a building without walking it first. It can be hard to back out of a tight turn. When your in the driver seat your responsible for everything. It can be hard to call the shots when you think your not the superior. If you would have said hey let me jump out and walk this he would have said good idea. If he said no then you could have said well then you drive it around.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

This talk about driving around buildings reminds me of my recent training in a new driving job as a fuel hauler. It would drive my trainer crazy that I’d jump out and look before driving around an unfamiliar location. He finally told me “I have over twenty years driving into these same stations-if I tell you to drive around behind a station, do it.” So I did, but as soon as I got out on my own, it was right back to hopping out to check stuff if it was unfamiliar. Kind of funny.

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