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Cwc's Comment
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You can also click on anyone's name and it will show you the pictures they have posted if you scroll down. Say for instance they have a picture of a check stub.^🙄 Of their six figures.🤔

andhe78's Comment
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You can also click on anyone's name and it will show you the pictures they have posted if you scroll down. Say for instance they have a picture of a check stub.^🙄 Of their six figures.🤔

Lol, gonna have to do better than that. That 52k picture was in reply to someone asking about FIRST year wages. That’s my first ten months and I made that clear. Those 1900 weekly stubs, that was to show what I was bringing in as a second year driver and that was to back up another flatbed driver who no one believed was bringing in those kind of numbers. 1900 a week average is pretty dang close to six figures a year. And going into my third year, the numbers keep getting better. So what’s the problem here?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Cwc's Comment
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You can also click on anyone's name and it will show you the pictures they have posted if you scroll down. Say for instance they have a picture of a check stub.^🙄 Of their six figures.🤔

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Lol, gonna have to do better than that. That 52k picture was in reply to someone asking about FIRST year wages. That’s my first ten months and I made that clear. Those 1900 weekly stubs, that was to show what I was bringing in as a second year driver and that was to back up another flatbed driver who no one believed was bringing in those kind of numbers. 1900 a week average is pretty dang close to six figures a year. And going into my third year, the numbers keep getting better. So what’s the problem here?

None. If he looks he'll see a first year pay stub. That's kinda what he's been after.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
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You wouldn't see much difference in your net pay in trucking. Honestly, you may see less. Like others have said, getting into this for money is not a good idea. Being smart and a hard-worker doesn't mean you'll be productive. I've seen people that are very smart have a lot of issues backing up. I've seen people that aren't so smart be able to back a trailer seamlessly. It all depends on ability.

Another problem you're having here is you're counting other peoples money. You're going into this expecting to make what a food driver makes or a Walmart driver makes. You asked why would anyone drive for . 38 CPM when Walmart is paying 0.89 CPM. The answer is very simple. Walmart doesn't hire just anybody. They are very selective and would rather be short staffed than have bodies that are incompetent and not productive.

You read all these advertisements and think "how can a truck driver make this much?". There are a lot of answers to this question.

1) the ad says " up to" which means that's what their top performers are earning.

2) they require experience and pay more to lure people in.

3) it's harder than it seems and they have trouble retaining people. There are companies advertising 75-80K a year for specific accounts like dollar general. Hard to get in, hard to get out and a lot of physical work. Also very risky. Getting preventables for hitting things in these tight areas will make you not hirable.

Trucking jobs aren't all the same. They pay differently for different tasks and different skills. Going into this because some guy makes 70k or because an ad says I can make that much isn't a good reason.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Don's Comment
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Relating to your current occupation, Ask yourself: "Do I still enjoy what I do?" If you say, "yes, I do" and the only reason you are looking to change is financial, don't be hasty in changing. Driving means long work days, and earnings depend on whether you are kept moving (driving miles) amongst other factors. I was a nurse for 32 years. I made great money, but was so burned out I started suffering both mentally and physically. I had to get away from that profession. I made more money as a nurse than I currently do driving, but I enjoy driving much more. I guess what I am trying to say is don't choose driving or any other career for the possibility of a better opportunity to make more money. There are more factors involved that will determine what you can earn as a driver.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

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Usually people who go into trucking strictly for the money end up getting out of trucking for the same reason. You need to have a better motivation than the financial one.

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I’ve always disagreed with this site about this and have felt you guys romanticize the job too much.

Well Andhe78, since we're all truck drivers here and that's the only point we disagree on... well, I think we're doing pretty good!

I did qualify my statement by prefacing it with "Usually."

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Shannon. You have rec’d great advice so far. Sit down and figure out your priorities. Only you can do that. Read all the various info on this site and you will get a picture of what this industry and lifestyle is about.

The industry is not one size fits all by any means. It is varied more so than any other industry I have seen. However we all started the same. At the bottom as a student. The folks around here are here because we choose to be. No one is paid a cent to be here. We all have a passion for seeing people succeed in this industry. It has become an extended family among many.

Although we are heavily regulated, trust me it will wear you out. Many days all I want to do is grab a shower and crash. It is both mentally and sometimes physicaly challenging. We all have our various reasons for being here, but trust in the fact we are not dummies by any means. Personally I do it to have something to do in life. I am retired but too young to sit around, and yes after 6 years I make a very comfortable living. Doing what I do is in no way for a rookie, but is attainable for someone with the right situation.

I wish you well in your decision making search. Ask whatever you wonder about. The only stupid question is the one not asked.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

40 Days's Comment
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I taught high school and college level math and did executive protection on the side before becoming a trucker. Education is irrelevant ask others. I make what you are claiming in training. Rough life but rewarding.

Shannimal's Comment
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Ok, I'm reviving a 2 year and 10 month old thread. I'm updating this thread from my bunk as I'm being unloaded. Yes, I became a Driver. As you read if interested and catch up on some of what spawned my change in careers I'll tell you the tipping point of my decision was Covid. They tried to jab me and I didn't take that crap. Instead of the jab I gave them the shove. Told them they can shove the job up their ***. Here is what happened since. I got payed to train which was awesome. I completed my CDL course in 2 days (the book work) and took the next 3 days off. Took all my test in 2 minutes each, General knowledge test was 3 min and some change. I wasn't racing, I just found the questions and material super easy. I'm fully endorsed and I only missed 2 questions on my hazmat. Funny story the guy at the DMV set me down at my computer to test. Well within 2 minutes I was back at his window. He asked: "what's wrong, is the computer broken again?". I said no, I'm finished lmao. He looked puzzled and amazed lol. I did really well on the practical examination and my tester only had one thing to ding me on and she said it was kind of a gray area. She had informed me of where our route was taking us. Still a few blocks back I knew I would be making a left eventually. She said I should always be in the right lane of travel but she understood I was preparing for a future left hand turn...she just thought it was a little premature. Other than that flying colors. Once all tested out and had my CDL I trained for another 8 weeks with various driver trainers. I started my journey in March of this year and June 1st I was released on my own. I'm loving it! I love the solitude of being alone. I was so fed up with loser coworkers that always let me down. In this job its up to you to perform and make it happen. The truck driving clicked right away with me and backing isn't an issue (driving Volvo sleeper 53' refer). I've been delivering in downtown LA. That's tiger country...the streets, freeways, the docks, the crackheads that leap off the curbs...you name it. I'm doing really well. I back up often with zero pull ups. Just last week I was at a dock that was designed for box trucks with roll up doors. I literally was so jammed in that the door seals touched on each side with the adjacent trailer doors already in the hole. To boot...this was a back in off a busy street with obstacles, pedestrians, and zero margin for error. There wasn't even space to say there was an inch of room because there wasn't. I had to stay in my tractor (I usually do anyway) but you couldn't open the doors if you wanted to lol. I'm glad I made the switch. I've got my plug in cooler, my coffee maker, my laptop, and always bring some good grub. This might sound gross but I got a nice sturdy trash can and I just take a dump in that. I have hefty bags and just bag it and dispose of it (properly) like an overgrown dog. The restrooms are usually pretty gross anyway. At first I crawled under my trailer to dookie but I'm 6'7 and despite trying to hunch down as small as possible I kept hitting my head under the trailer so that's when the trash can idea came about. Once I got that all sorted out everything else has been really smooth. GPS can mess you up sometimes but I try to be careful and review the route very thoroughly. I don't have a CB yet but will eventually get one. I'm glad that I tried something new. I wasn't for sure if I would like it or not. Now I wish I would have done it sooner. When I started this thread I didn't have a relationship, pets, or anything like that. Shortly after the thread was posted I reconnected with a long lost love interest. We immediately picked up where we left off and got married. Now I'm married and 2 pets. At that point I thought trucking was for sure out of the picture for me. I mean how could I just get married then say see ya later. I discussed things with her and went over everything that we could see as potential issues. The particular job I have I'm home every weekend and almost always 1 night a week and sometimes 2 nights. Its not as painful as some driving jobs can be because I'm not doing over the road. I'm regional CA, NV, AZ with an occasional trip somewhere far but that is rare. Trucking hasn't strained our relationship at all. I'm too busy to be homesick and since I'm back so often the wife is fine as well. She also works full-time so that occupies her time. Then with FaceTime and technology we make sure to spend time with each other everyday. Life is good. Ok...super huge post but a lot to cover lol. I just thought I would share my experience thus far with anyone whom was interested. :-)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Shannimal, it's really cool to hear from you again!

I'm thrilled to see you're enjoying your new career!

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