Help Me Find My Forever Trucking Home

Topic 28369 | Page 1

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Scott Y.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey There Drivers, Looking for any information you all could share with me. I’ve been driving about 3 years now and am looking for a change. I’m looking to continue OTR and would like to join a carrier that covers all 48 states. To me, finding the proper fit means more than just cpm. These are the carriers that are at the top of my list so far...

Meiborg- Great equipment with good miles. They have a salaried program right now 3 week out OTR, flat $75,000 annual

Merx Global- nice newer Volvo’s. .50cpm. A little concerned because I can’t find much driver feedback on them

Sharky- great benefits, free healthcare for family and .54cpm, but older trucks. Have a long history

Nussbaum- Great reviews, never heard a bad thing about them. Everything hung sounds great about the company, Except cpm , .40 to start. Recruiter says with all bonuses and pay factored in, drivers are averaging $1,000-$1,2000 per week

I’m looking to settle in and find my long term home. Any input would be appreciated. Thank you all and be safe

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Nearly everybody here is happy with where they are and would consider their company to be the best there is. With sharky providing free health insurance how does the insurance rate? Is it a really high deductible that will have you on the hook for $15k before it covers anything? Why do you feel you need to switch carriers to find your forever home? There's no wrong answer but it may help narrow down what exactly it is you're after.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I’m looking to settle in and find my long term home.

Scott, you can't decide on your "long term home" from data you uncover or input from other drivers. Let me give you an example...

I drive for Knight Transportation. I'm earning more than most drivers - over 90,000 dollars per year. I love it here, but I made this job work for me, just like you will when you create your destiny in this career.

Just yesterday I delivered to a customer where the receiving clerk asked me, "What terminal are you out of?" After I responded he said, "I drove for Knight for five years out of the Katy, TX terminal. It was the worst five years of my life!"

So, which one of us are you going to believe?

To be honest with you, each of the companies you mentioned have long term drivers there who love it, and other drivers who would tell you to never consider that company under any circumstances. Who ya gonna believe?

My point is, you are going to determine where your "long term home" is. You'll do that by your work ethic. Your performance will dictate your success and your satisfaction with this career. I can't stress it enough. I've been teaching drivers this for years and it almost always falls on deaf ears.

Would you be surprised when I tell you that CR England, Swift, and CRST have long lists of Million Miler Drivers who would never consider leaving the company? I'd bet a Benjamin you're thinking I'm nuts now. Forget about trying to pick the "right" company. All you've got to do is be the "right" driver. That's the essence of finding your "forever home."

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

Without knowing you personally and your goals/desires almost impossible for anyone to give you a realistic recommendation.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Scott Y.'s Comment
member avatar

First off Old School, I couldn’t agree more. Ultimately You get out of any situation what your willing to put into it. Every company is going to have drivers at all points on the spectrum.

What I was hoping for in my post was simply to see what kind of feedback other drivers here could offer on the four primary companies I listed...Meiborg Bros, Sharky, Merx Global and Nussbaum And if anyone wanted to tell me about an OTR , Coast to Coast carrier that they feel is worth looking into, I’d welcome the suggestions.

I love what I do and give my company the best I can on a daily basis. I’m simply looking for a company that is willing to respect that and return the favor. As fas as why I’m moving from my current, it simply comes down to how they pay out the miles. As they call it, they pay satellite miles. Explained to me as shortest distance from point A to Point B in a straight line. What that means to me is that on average, 12-15% of my driven miles go unpaid weekly. I know there is give and take on how miles are factored but that is simply giving up too much.

So again, all input is welcome. Thank you all

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

With 3 years experience the sky is the limit for ya. You're gonna have to find out what truly makes you happy. For me it was type of equipment and freight And I'm getting that now with top equipment, a variety of freight, and great home time. To answer your question specifically I have talked to a few Melborg guys as I run into all the time up and down I-90 in Illinois. I've always heard great things about them. Drivers always seem happy. Couldn't go wrong with Nussbaum either as they are always getting voted in the top 20 carriers of the year.

Mr. Curmudgeon's Comment
member avatar

Scott - are you looking at Sharky out of Quincy, IL? They are, as you have said, a long term carrier. They are also conglomerated with SisBro? and one other line as well. Seems that's kind of common with the Quincy outfits. Good luck in your search. I can understand the disappointment with missing out on 12%.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Tee1234's Comment
member avatar

I’ve Spoken to few Walmart drivers but all said they like working for them money is good always say 80 something k for first year with them all companies have good and bad I personally enjoy pulling doubles in a day cab for ltl carrier no need to find parking after a shift you can be in a hotel every night they let you run 6 days a week regional sometimes you can go past the regional if allowed it’s home every weekend it all just matters to what your willing to settle for and give.

Hey There Drivers, Looking for any information you all could share with me. I’ve been driving about 3 years now and am looking for a change. I’m looking to continue OTR and would like to join a carrier that covers all 48 states. To me, finding the proper fit means more than just cpm. These are the carriers that are at the top of my list so far...

Meiborg- Great equipment with good miles. They have a salaried program right now 3 week out OTR, flat $75,000 annual

Merx Global- nice newer Volvo’s. .50cpm. A little concerned because I can’t find much driver feedback on them

Sharky- great benefits, free healthcare for family and .54cpm, but older trucks. Have a long history

Nussbaum- Great reviews, never heard a bad thing about them. Everything hung sounds great about the company, Except cpm , .40 to start. Recruiter says with all bonuses and pay factored in, drivers are averaging $1,000-$1,2000 per week

I’m looking to settle in and find my long term home. Any input would be appreciated. Thank you all and be safe

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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