Requesting Some Assistance...

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Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey, all!

I am not a new CDL driver. I have seen a few threads similar to the following, I note most (or even all) are from the new CDL Students or the soon-to-be. I do not know if my situation will be viewed the same as theirs since I have enough experience to know better. So, here goes...

I worked the CDL side of trucking from 1995-2000. I gave up the license for personal reasons. Skip forward to 2015, I attended a MEGA school (Prime) to regain my license, which I did. I've remained employed ever since.

I kept a squeaky-clean driving record until September 2018, when I was clipped for driving that restricted left lane in Illinois. A year later, I brain-farted and did it again in Kentucky. I'm not used to getting tickets, so I was pretty upset with myself for WEEKS after that. Problem is, and what I did not know at that time, is Kentucky calls that Improper Passing. A straight Left Lane violation is considered minor, but a second under the title of Improper Passing I have recently learned is a MAJOR violation.

Before I knew it was such a major violation, I left my home and job in Illinois for San Antonio, Texas. I love it here, so I decided to live here. I had a large enough savings to take it easy and take great care on the new job search. That was 2 months ago. I usually secure a new job before leaving a current, but this time I figured I could just chance it. After all, even through COVID, a lot of companies were hiring. They still are, just not me. I finally got one company manager to clue me into why. As you may have guessed, it was not just the two tickets, it really is that last ticket. Improper Passing is major, and coupled with that ticket the year before, I now have 6 Points against my CDL. My heart sank and I felt gutted as I suddenly realized I had completely F'ed myself by allowing complacency to replace common sense and vigilance. After years of climbing that income ladder, I was now slapped back to the bottom. Again, no one to blame but myself...but it's done and I am left with extremely limited options. bad luck? No. Three bad decisions (the tickets and the decision to move without the above knowledge). If I can find a company willing to hire me, it'll be OTR again. Just the next two years driving a lower gig will be a constant reminder, especially that part that my last gig paid .55/mile loaded or empty. See? F'ed myself and need no more lashings...

I am now in the unenviable position of requesting help with companies which will likely hire an experienced trucker with a messed up DMV. I also ask to not be lectured. I'd only agree with you which would make the interaction no fun for you. See? I'm keeping my spirits up!

If anyone can assist with a suggestion or few, I would be quite appreciative. I live in San Antonio, TX.

Thanks in advance,

Mike

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Michael,

I was looking into San Antonio as residence so il give you what i was looking into. You probably know this, but there's tons of big companies there and I was looking to do yard dog work. Toyota, Amazon, carrier, Walmart up in new brumfiel to name a few.

Also, might check into lanes running out of Laredo.

Sorry to hear about the violations, but I'm sure you'll find something.

Scott M's Comment
member avatar

Does anyone know the name of the recruiter on this site? He is very knowledgeable and might be able to help.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Does anyone know the name of the recruiter on this site? He is very knowledgeable and might be able to help.

That's JRod.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Not trying to hijack this thread but him mentioning 6 points. How do companies view points on ones license when one tries to get a new job with points on their license?

Tee1234's Comment
member avatar

Just apply everywhere I was in a similar situation and managed to find a local company small fleet 10 trucks to work for in California with two tickets for speeding. Just stay positive and apply I still managed to get calls from otr companies like jb hunt and swift who had regional work should I take it doesn’t hurt to roll the dice on every application I also managed to get a call from yrc so just continue to stay positive and if that ticket is to go to court suggest off the record and ticket clinic two firms who have traffic lawyers who maybe able to help reduce the ticket to another one less serious good luck to you I hope you get something

Hey, all!

I am not a new CDL driver. I have seen a few threads similar to the following, I note most (or even all) are from the new CDL Students or the soon-to-be. I do not know if my situation will be viewed the same as theirs since I have enough experience to know better. So, here goes...

I worked the CDL side of trucking from 1995-2000. I gave up the license for personal reasons. Skip forward to 2015, I attended a MEGA school (Prime) to regain my license, which I did. I've remained employed ever since.

I kept a squeaky-clean driving record until September 2018, when I was clipped for driving that restricted left lane in Illinois. A year later, I brain-farted and did it again in Kentucky. I'm not used to getting tickets, so I was pretty upset with myself for WEEKS after that. Problem is, and what I did not know at that time, is Kentucky calls that Improper Passing. A straight Left Lane violation is considered minor, but a second under the title of Improper Passing I have recently learned is a MAJOR violation.

Before I knew it was such a major violation, I left my home and job in Illinois for San Antonio, Texas. I love it here, so I decided to live here. I had a large enough savings to take it easy and take great care on the new job search. That was 2 months ago. I usually secure a new job before leaving a current, but this time I figured I could just chance it. After all, even through COVID, a lot of companies were hiring. They still are, just not me. I finally got one company manager to clue me into why. As you may have guessed, it was not just the two tickets, it really is that last ticket. Improper Passing is major, and coupled with that ticket the year before, I now have 6 Points against my CDL. My heart sank and I felt gutted as I suddenly realized I had completely F'ed myself by allowing complacency to replace common sense and vigilance. After years of climbing that income ladder, I was now slapped back to the bottom. Again, no one to blame but myself...but it's done and I am left with extremely limited options. bad luck? No. Three bad decisions (the tickets and the decision to move without the above knowledge). If I can find a company willing to hire me, it'll be OTR again. Just the next two years driving a lower gig will be a constant reminder, especially that part that my last gig paid .55/mile loaded or empty. See? F'ed myself and need no more lashings...

I am now in the unenviable position of requesting help with companies which will likely hire an experienced trucker with a messed up DMV. I also ask to not be lectured. I'd only agree with you which would make the interaction no fun for you. See? I'm keeping my spirits up!

If anyone can assist with a suggestion or few, I would be quite appreciative. I live in San Antonio, TX.

Thanks in advance,

Mike

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

Not trying to hijack this thread but him mentioning 6 points. How do companies view points on ones license when one tries to get a new job with points on their license?

Now this I can help you with. Depending on the violation, a certain number of points are assigned for each moving violation. The number of points depends on severity of offense.

Points on the license matter in three ways:

1. State

2. Insurance

3. Company

With a CDL , any points matter even more than a regular license.

At state level, points determine where and when the DMV must penalize a driver (CDL or not). States do vary regarding this. Some states are tighter, while other are more lenient. The state usually use points to determine whether or not to restrict, suspend, or revoke a license. Some states don't use a point system while choosing instead to decide the above mentioned penalties on how many moving violations someone receives within a certain time-frame (usually 12 months). Most states share violation info (some do not) with other states when exchanging licenses, thus transferring points from the previous state to the new one. In these cases, the points are assigned (if any) at the amount for the NEW state even if the OLD state assigned less. In the case where the OLD state does not assign points, but the NEW state does, the newer license will reflect points from the new state.

For insurance, any and all moving violations (and a scant few non-moving) increase rates; you probably already know this. Regular AUTO insurance assigns rates heavily based on the driving record. Insurance companies usually use the state's assigned points, but can also use their own. They use their own for those in states without official scoring. But, some companies have their own system regardless of the state's official tally. Mostly, moving violations and accidents will cause rates to rise, but sometimes the customer's record can cause cancellation of refusal for coverage. This is even more so for CDL holders. See below.

Trucking companies are very safety oriented. Although they say it's for everyone's benefit, it's really only for themselves. They have ONE good reason for that: costs related to liability and risk. Trucking companies can hire anyone they wish at any time. If they ignore a DMV report that red flags the potential hire and that person ends up really being a problem on the road, then the company WILL be sued (especially when damage, injury, or death is involved). That's liability. THOSE costs can destroy an entire company in one verdict. To mitigate the risks associated with bad drivers, INSURANCE companies will set a certain criteria for new hires (or even current employees). Now, they do NOT have a say in who does or does not get hired. Insurance companies, however, will inform the trucking company of the added costs for hiring that driver (or keeping them employed). Usually, Trucking Company can hire a high-risk driver anyway after agreeing to pay Insurance Company a greatly inflated rate for that driver. By greatly inflated, I mean that the carrier's $75,000 normal rate can and WILL become $135,000 if they hire or keep a driver considered high-risk. Most will not be willing to do that, even if they adore the driver or potential hire. Just not worth it.

Now, there are many cases where a company effectively insures themselves. These companies must register as an insurance provider (among other things) usually through starting/owning a seemingly separate company under their corporate "umbrella." These companies assume ALL risks associated with tickets, accidents, and so on. The most common of these are the so-called MEGA carriers. It's cheaper in the long run to insure themselves due to the number of trucks increasing violation and accident chances AND...they usually hire and train new drivers (which increases risks a lot more). These companies may hire as they wish. Some are strict, others are not. MOST pay the lowest to their drivers across the board, and that is ONLY because they take full legal responsibility for risky hires and driver who become a risk. A lot of people whine about insurance companies having too much power over trucking company hiring practices. That is NOT true. Insurance companies only have power over the rates they give if any) for each driver they hire. Hiring decisions are always up to the trucking company. If they wish to fully cover an uninsurable driver on their own or accept higher premiums for a high-risk hire, that's totally up to the trucking company.

(continued on next post)

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Michael W.'s Comment
member avatar

Not trying to hijack this thread but him mentioning 6 points. How do companies view points on ones license when one tries to get a new job with points on their license?

(continued from previous post)

But, that's not all for the trucking companies! They also must be vigilant over their FMCSA scores. THOSE scores can make or break a company. Every violation (traffic, inspections, and such) reflect through that score. Keep it low or otherwise acceptable, no problems. When it reaches a certain level, FMCSA will intervene. If it reaches the highest limit, the company loses it's authority to operate. FMCSA scores also affect the loads a carrier can carry AND whether or not they can deal with certain brokerages and other private businesses requiring shipping services. That equates to a loss of revenue, which can and frequently is a business killer. ALL suffer for that. The company isn't making the money they used to and neither are the drivers. ALL drivers, not just the bad ones who got the company there. The company not only loses revenue but also loses their better drivers. Lower income for the company and the need to keep the trucks rolling then translates into lower pay per mile for new hires and the burning desire of the company to shed the higher paid veterans (or cutting their miles to the point they move on).

Lastly, I'll touch on FMSCA scores and YOU as a CDL holder.

Most are under the impression that CDL holders are also scored. Yes and no. FMCSA PSP reports assign points to inspection discrepancies, overweight warnings/tickets, and accidents (at fault or not). There may be one or two more, I am not sure. That report also shows whether or not there were injuries, fault of driver (or not), deaths, Out of Service orders, or non-OOS. One does not have to receive a ticket or summons for an entry to be made. While inspection violations are NOT held again the driver's CDL, it is held against the company via CSA scoring and only listed on PSP under the driver's name (violations for 3 years, accidents - at fault or not - for 5). The GOOD thing is the CSA points do not follow a CDL driver to another company. The BAD thing is the new company can see that list upon request and can decide not to risk raising their company CSA score. MOVING violations are NOT included on the driver's PSP report.

HOWEVER...

As mentioned above, moving violations can score points against an individual's driver's license (depending on if the issuing state has such a system). FMCSA adds points to the COMPANY CSA score for each moving violation IF that violation was in their CMV. If, for example, an Improper Passing violation is 4 points to the CDL holder's license, it's FIVE points to the company CSA score. Not all moving violations are covered. Only MAJOR violations are covered. Speeding less than 15 over the speed limit is minor, while 15 and over is major. States may still consider 15-19 over a minor, but FMCSA calls this reckless driving (even if that's not the charge). As such, heavy points (I think 10) are assigned to the company CSA, an entry MAY be made to a driver's PSP, while the state only adds 2 points (example) to the license itself. For CDL holders, INSURANCE companies use the FMCSA weighted scores for their DMV calculations. While a state may assign 6 points for a Lane Violation (2 points) and Improper Passing (4 points), INSURANCE companies will calculate the 2 points for Lane Violation but FIVE points for Improper Passing. On the license itself, 6 points. For trucking purposes, it's 7.

I know the above is a lot to take in, but that's what I've learned just recently through my own situation. Hopefully it wasn't too confusing. And, I apologize for the word vomit posts.

Michael Wonch

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Trucking companies are very safety oriented. Although they say it's for everyone's benefit, it's really only for themselves.

Michael you posted some great information, but none of it proved your own assessment stated above. Just the very fact that safety benefits them should make you realize it benefits those who share the public roadways along side them. Safety helps us reduce accidents. Those accidents usually involve others. Therefore safety has far reaching benefits beyond those who are trying to control their costs.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Agree with Old School in that safety is a benefit for everybody, not just a monetary plus for the company.

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