Wanting To Become An Owner/Operator

Topic 28820 | Page 1

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Duane C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen of the roadways, I am looking to become an O/O but don't exactly know what to look for in a truck. I don't want to get taken or buy a lemon I spend most of my money and time fixing know what I mean? Anyway I had a conversation with a fellow co-worker about Road trucks (with sleepers) and Day cabs. Which is cheaper? What's the going rate between Road truck and Day cab? What is a good mileage that says the truck still has some life in it? Or better yet how many miles is too many or the hours? Oh I guess I should include this I am more so looking at Day cabs, running locally or regional as to be home most nights. I want something that will run and pull really well. What's a good powerful engine? Cat, Detroit, Cummings, etc.? Can you guys give me some suggestions that will put me on the road to a rewarding O/O career? Thanks and Stay Safe out there on the roads and masking up in public, Dtrain

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
Can you guys give me some suggestions that will put me on the road to a rewarding O/O career

Honestly don't do it, become a company driver and make the same or probably more than a O/O. I ran the numbers hard a few years ago and came out to the same or less than a company driver and I didnt include health insurance or vacations either.

Just out of curiosity why do you want to become one?

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

Howdy!

The questions you are asking has me thinking that you don't have your CDL yet, so that means no experience.

I hate to burst your bubble, but until you have a number of years experience, you are going to pay a higher cost in insurance and other related expenses.

You are putting the cart before the horse...You need to go to a company school where you will be trained in exchange for roughly 1 year of driving. Going this route, you won't pay for school up front and will only pay if you don't fulfill your obligation. Then, you can look at your situation to see if you are still wanting to be an 00 or you need more experience. I came back out on the road 6 years ago after being off the road for 22 years. Now, more than ever I have no desire to be an 00. I look at the bills when I breakdown, because I have to sign them, and the cost of repairs of even simple things is beyond ridiculous!

We do have a few owner-operators in this forum and hopefully they will weigh in. However this site is more to give new people information on how to be an excellent driver.

Laura

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Duane you have been here for close to 5 years. Have you been driving during that time???

Honestly owning a truck is a big big pain and even bigger the less experience you have. I can give you more specific info if you yell me more. First you have to know what your going to be pulling, then you spec the truck for the job.

Drivetrains vary widely, and some of it comes down to preference. I have a cummins and 18 spd manual. It works well for pulling tankers.

You also need to know if your going to get your own authority or run under a companies.

These are the starting questions, they get more involved from here.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Just based on your questions, the answer would be a resounding no.

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

I don’t want to be negative but from the questions you have asked, you don’t know nearly enough to become an owner operator.

You make less money, you work harder and longer. You don’t get to go home on the weekends as a regional or local driver, unless the day cab you bought you paid for cash And you have the ability to survive on less money because your insurance is going to destroy you.

I won’t even get into the fuel costs, maintenance and repairs, or all of the taxes you will have to pay.

Hello Ladies and Gentlemen of the roadways, I am looking to become an O/O but don't exactly know what to look for in a truck. I don't want to get taken or buy a lemon I spend most of my money and time fixing know what I mean? Anyway I had a conversation with a fellow co-worker about Road trucks (with sleepers) and Day cabs. Which is cheaper? What's the going rate between Road truck and Day cab? What is a good mileage that says the truck still has some life in it? Or better yet how many miles is too many or the hours? Oh I guess I should include this I am more so looking at Day cabs, running locally or regional as to be home most nights. I want something that will run and pull really well. What's a good powerful engine? Cat, Detroit, Cummings, etc.? Can you guys give me some suggestions that will put me on the road to a rewarding O/O career? Thanks and Stay Safe out there on the roads and masking up in public, Dtrain

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

The fact that you are asking these questions on a forum that you must know caters primarily to company drivers and new drivers shows that you are: 1) not qualified to be an O/O, and 2) not prepared to be an O/O. Go get your CDL , be a company driver for at least a year... you’ll be in a position to answer these questions yourself.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Duane C.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I have always heard O/O make a lot more money than company drivers and you can pretty much call your own shots. If you don't want a run or be dispatched somewhere you can turn them down. Yes you still have a boss somewhat and dispatch, but you have a little more authority of what you will haul, places you will go, etc. So I thought it might be a good thing?????

Duane C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello Laura,

I must inform you that I do have some experience. I do not have OTR experience but I have been a company, local driver for 16yrs. I am aware of the cost of being an OO but in the long run I thought they make more money and you have a lot more say so over what you will and will not do.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

There are about 19 steps of being an owner/operator before “load selection” and “selecting a truck”.

We do not recommend it on here. We recommend becoming a company driver. As far as reading stuff on the internet, or believing things you heard, obviously it’s not always best.

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