Lease Operator Advantages

Topic 29092 | Page 1

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Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

I have read the negative reasons in the forum why new drivers should not become lease operators. I am sure there is wisdom in being cautious when starting out. I am not in any hurry but I do like to research things in advance. I wonder if some of you who are lease operators would be willing to dialogue with me directly through email (raif.turner@gmail.com) or text messaging (806-789-8877).

If not, I would also welcome your input here in the forum.

Thank you for your information.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

I have read the negative reasons in the forum why new drivers should not become lease operators. I am sure there is wisdom in being cautious when starting out. I am not in any hurry but I do like to research things in advance. I wonder if some of you who are lease operators would be willing to dialogue with me directly through email (raif.turner@gmail.com) or text messaging (806-789-8877).

If not, I would also welcome your input here in the forum.

Thank you for your information.

9 times out of 10 when I see a rig pulled over by DOT it's a lease opeator. Rarely EVER see a corporate truck getting inspected.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Do the math with the truck payment, fuel, and maintenance while trying to run for a dollar a mile. You don't need anyone telling you it's good or bad. You should be able to figure it out by yourself.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Don't Do It! Period.

Want more data on why not to? Go on Kearsey's YouTube channel.

Talking to a lease operator about leasing....why? Do you expect one to say it's a bad idea?

I'm not going to get into all the drawbacks, pitfalls, misinformation, smoke and mirrors, and crazy sales pitches on here again on why to never, ever go fleece. I've done it too many times on here in the past to waste time typing it all again.

Dan F.'s Comment
member avatar

There are only two choices and if you have less than five years experience in the last three are not accident free you only have one choice really. You either be a company driver or an o/o. You should not even consider becoming an owner operator unless you have five years experience with the last three, being incident free.

If you’re not smart enough to have started working on your credit score, being out of debt, and having money saved up in the bank, then being an owner operator is not for you.

A lease is much worse than being an owner operator. You earn way less per mile, you still have the vast majority of the legal liability, you’re still responsible for maintenance, fuel, and Insurance in most cases.

Lease operator never thinks about ALL THE COSTS.

You should be saving at least four cents a mile just for tires. Do you know how many people don’t even know that.

Let me give you an example about a horrible company called Landstar (my opinion based on my dealings with them in their double brokers) Landstar will pay registration. You are on the hook for

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I made this from an actual lease ops at Prime who was on his second lease with 5 years experience.

Since then I have gotten numbers from brand new drivers who went lease right out of training. Their solo numbers are $1000 to $1200 per week solo before taxes and no benefits. This includes taking money out of their weekly pay to be able to take time off and have the truck payment covered.

I have more lease settlements on my Youtube channel where I compare.

Actual Lease Op Numbers

Uncle Rake's Comment
member avatar

Well, it’s been about six weeks since I asked for input from lease operators and I never heard from anyone. Perhaps that in itself answers my question. Thank you to those of you who responded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Howre things going on the road Uncle Rake?

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Well, it’s been about six weeks since I asked for input from lease operators and I never heard from anyone. Perhaps that in itself answers my question. Thank you to those of you who responded.

Howre things going on the road Uncle Rake?

Yeah, Raif .. how ARE things going?

Rob T. . . Do we even HAVE any L/O's on TT? I know a handful of O/O's but can't think of any L/O's offhand, in our current member pool.

It's nice to HEAR from you, Uncle Rake~!!!

~ Anne ~

confused.gif good-luck.gif confused.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar
Rob T. . . Do we even HAVE any L/O's on TT? I know a handful of O/O's but can't think of any L/O's offhand, in our current member pool.

Only one I can think of top the top of my head is Brandon Kitts for Roehl. He had switched over to dry van from flatbed. Unfortunately we don't hear much from him though, and I don't think he's shared the financial side of it, though he is training as well. We've had a few members jump in and never come back to tell us how it went. Daniel B had done it for a short time with Prime and said he did well. For him though it was a short enough time he didn't run into any mechanical issues.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
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