Predictive Hiring Assessments Becoming Popular Recruiting Tool. But Will It Cure Turnover?

Topic 29222 | Page 1

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DaveW's Comment
member avatar

It's not exactly a trade secret that trucking companies want their recruiters to find them the best, most-qualified drivers. After all, it's in everybody's best interest for a carrier's drivers to be able to safely and efficiently move freight from Point A to Point B. To find drivers who are the best fit for their trucking firms -- meaning qualified drivers who will stay with them longer -- recruiters are now turning to a hiring practice called predictive hiring – hiring based on the results of a behavior assessment test.

Predictive hiring assessments becoming popular recruiting tool. But will it cure turnover?

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

That's pretty funny, in the article they say theres no pass or fail then in the end it says when you game the system, then you've passed the test, now what. I'll be takin no personality tests and could save them a ton of money for these tests. PAY YOUR DRIVERS/EMPLOYEES BETTER, TREAT THEM WELL AND GET THEM HOME TIME. Turnover problem solved. Companies...YOUR WELCOME.

Eugene K.'s Comment
member avatar

These assessments have been all the rage in corporate America for quite some time now. I’ve taken more of them than I can count.

For some of the more advanced and intensive ones, the most frightening thing about them is how scarily accurate they are. After being hired at one of my employers, I received a copy of the assessment from the third party that administered it. It was literally almost a hundred pages of analysis into my deepest hopes and fears that I sat reading for hours with jaws agape. It’s as if there was a fly on the wall for an entire lifetime of therapy sessions 😂

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
I'll be takin no personality tests and could save them a ton of money for these tests. PAY YOUR DRIVERS/EMPLOYEES BETTER, TREAT THEM WELL AND GET THEM HOME TIME. Turnover problem solved. Companies...YOUR WELCOME.

Mikey, what you are saying sounds good. It even makes sense. To be honest drivers have been saying that stuff for years. I've been watching this phenomenon of driver turnover for a decade now. It's still remains an enigma to drivers and the corporate suits who deal with the issue.

I tell people all the time that trucking is one of the most misunderstood careers I've come across. Take a look at my own personal experiences related to this issue.

  • I've seen our pay increase substantially over the past decade.
  • I've been treated exceptionally well by the major carriers I've worked for.
  • I've always been routed home when I request it.

I've had people who request my help with this issue, and I balk at their offers. This issue is, in my opinion, a driver issue. The corporate suits can't do enough to solve it. They've tried it all. Here they are trying another angle. There are some problems you can keep throwing money at until you've completely thrown the market out of balance. If the problem remains, you have to recognize that the money wasn't really the issue after all. I've been a driver who hasn't had issues with the "greener pastures syndrome." I've been satisfied with my pay, my treatment as a member of the team, and I've gone home when I needed or wanted. It's never been an issue for me. Yet everyone declares it an industry wide issue.

I've had discussions with several "Million Miler" drivers at major carriers. Their experience mirrors mine. They don't understand why so many drivers have the sentiments that you voiced. I'm not being critical of your remarks at all. Oh on the contrary, there are thousands of drivers who carry that same torch! I just think it is a completely misunderstood phenomenon that we have to somehow conquer. The only path I've seen to overcome it is a personal quest to beat the odds in this career. Each driver must determine how much money he wants to make and then do everything in his power to make that happen in his own sphere. Looking to our own efforts, and attacking this career as if it were a conflict or a struggle that we have to overcome will work wonders for our results and our satisfaction.

It's been the mission and purpose of Trucking Truth to help drivers see this path to success. I can tell folks how it works, and I can labor incessantly to motivate them, but ultimately it comes down to grasping the true concepts of success in trucking. We drivers are funny. We tend to be satisfied with laying blame rather than being introspective and evaluating how effective our own efforts could be. We have so much that lies within our power to control our destinies. We claim to want to be in control, but we don't really take the measures required. We tend to think behaviors like demanding our dispatchers work in a way that we consider best, and just generally being contrary with them shows that we are "in control." Yet we hurt ourselves repeatedly by taking that approach.

That's all I have time for right now, but you have definitely inspired me to write further on this subject. Thanks for that! I will soon put together an article on this subject - it's sure to be controversial, but I do know what has worked to keep me happily seated in the same truck and company for years. It had nothing to do with any corporate standard of poor treatment. In fact, it was mysteriously hidden in the way I treated them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

IMO, it's a money issue. Always will always has been. $1000 / 70 hours = $14.29/hr.

That's how much your going to pay someone to come out on the road into one of the most dangerous jobs in america, away from comfort and family.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'll be takin no personality tests and could save them a ton of money for these tests. PAY YOUR DRIVERS/EMPLOYEES BETTER, TREAT THEM WELL AND GET THEM HOME TIME. Turnover problem solved. Companies...YOUR WELCOME.

double-quotes-end.png

Mikey, what you are saying sounds good. It even makes sense. To be honest drivers have been saying that stuff for years. I've been watching this phenomenon of driver turnover for a decade now. It's still remains an enigma to drivers and the corporate suits who deal with the issue.

I tell people all the time that trucking is one of the most misunderstood careers I've come across. Take a look at my own personal experiences related to this issue.

  • I've seen our pay increase substantially over the past decade.
  • I've been treated exceptionally well by the major carriers I've worked for.
  • I've always been routed home when I request it.

I've had people who request my help with this issue, and I balk at their offers. This issue is, in my opinion, a driver issue. The corporate suits can't do enough to solve it. They've tried it all. Here they are trying another angle. There are some problems you can keep throwing money at until you've completely thrown the market out of balance. If the problem remains, you have to recognize that the money wasn't really the issue after all. I've been a driver who hasn't had issues with the "greener pastures syndrome." I've been satisfied with my pay, my treatment as a member of the team, and I've gone home when I needed or wanted. It's never been an issue for me. Yet everyone declares it an industry wide issue.

I've had discussions with several "Million Miler" drivers at major carriers. Their experience mirrors mine. They don't understand why so many drivers have the sentiments that you voiced. I'm not being critical of your remarks at all. Oh on the contrary, there are thousands of drivers who carry that same torch! I just think it is a completely misunderstood phenomenon that we have to somehow conquer. The only path I've seen to overcome it is a personal quest to beat the odds in this career. Each driver must determine how much money he wants to make and then do everything in his power to make that happen in his own sphere. Looking to our own efforts, and attacking this career as if it were a conflict or a struggle that we have to overcome will work wonders for our results and our satisfaction.

It's been the mission and purpose of Trucking Truth to help drivers see this path to success. I can tell folks how it works, and I can labor incessantly to motivate them, but ultimately it comes down to grasping the true concepts of success in trucking. We drivers are funny. We tend to be satisfied with laying blame rather than being introspective and evaluating how effective our own efforts could be. We have so much that lies within our power to control our destinies. We claim to want to be in control, but we don't really take the measures required. We tend to think behaviors like demanding our dispatchers work in a way that we consider best, and just generally being contrary with them shows that we are "in control." Yet we hurt ourselves repeatedly by taking that approach.

That's all I have time for right now, but you have definitely inspired me to write further on this subject. Thanks for that! I will soon put together an article on this subject - it's sure to be controversial, but I do know what has worked to keep me happily seated in the same truck and company for years. It had nothing to do with any corporate standard of poor treatment. In fact, it was mysteriously hidden in the way I treated them.

I absolutely don't disagree with you at all. A lot of it has to do with the drivers and their perception of things. "The grass is always greener syndrome", the many A-type personalities in this industry, not everyone is good at their jobs both drivers and dispatchers as well as support. There are tons of reasons why people change, money being a biggie. Often they hop around till they find what they were looking for and what he was looking for may not be what you or I am looking for. As for your further writings on this issue, I wish you luck, don't let writers cramp get to bad. Often new drivers swap solely for higher CPM as their first jobs are sometimes lower paid. I hit on the most popular reasons given by drivers although there are tons of sub-levels even of those. I don't know that I would trust the tests as many people just put what they think they want to hear.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I failed 3 personality tests. I don't play well with others apparently lol

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I failed 3 personality tests. I don't play well with others apparently lol

No. You have too much personality, compared to mere mortals.

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