Moving On After 6 Months Experience Suggestions?

Topic 29421 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

I'm approaching my 6th month of OTR... and looking to switch to a higher paying company.

Does anyone know of any OTR companies that may include as much of the following as possible:

+High CPM and miles per week/weekly minimum

+Services 48 states... (like to run coast to coast)

+Able to accumulate home time... for example, can earn 1 home day for every 6 days out w/ no cap on accrual

+No/low touch dry van or reefer

+Newer equipment w/ APU's.

+Self dispatch or no forced dispatch

Thanks for your input...

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm approaching my 6th month of OTR... and looking to switch to a higher paying company.

Does anyone know of any OTR companies that may include as much of the following as possible:

+High CPM and miles per week/weekly minimum

+Services 48 states... (like to run coast to coast)

+Able to accumulate home time... for example, can earn 1 home day for every 6 days out w/ no cap on accrual

+No/low touch dry van or reefer

+Newer equipment w/ APU's.

+Self dispatch or no forced dispatch

Thanks for your input...

That's a lot of ask for 6 months experience. The best thing for you to do is write down a list of all your wishes then start calling companies recruiters and ask them each one, write their answers down then, when done calling them all just compare their answers and pick the one that checks the most boxes.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APU's:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

What carrier do you drive with now?

Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

Transam

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'm curious. How did you come up with your decision to "move on?" I know you say you want a higher paying company. That's not what peaks my curiosity. I'm curious about your time line. How did you come up with the six month mark? Were you satisfied at three months? Why not give them a year? Surely there's still a lot you can learn. What triggered this at six months?

Your list of criteria is amazing. I mean you sound as if you have got something really special to offer somebody. Is there something special about you that makes you worthy of all those things you deem important? I have found that if I had something special to offer my trucking employer they treated me as if I was some coveted prize. They steadily increased my pay, kept me busy running the kind of routes I liked, and I never heard from them unless it was to tell me "Thanks, and here's some bonus money for you!" I've honestly never found myself looking for another trucking job. I changed companies one time in eight years. That was only because someone here at Trucking Truth talked me into contacting a recruiter who made me an incredible offer.

How are your relationships at Transam? People never seem to realize the importance of establishing a strong working relationship with their dispatcher. We can't ignore the power of that relationship. It can make or break us in this career.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

100% agree with OS.

I’ve been with Swift for 7 years now Godsgift (telling name)...run Walmart NE Regional Dedicated...no interest in looking elsewhere. Why do you think that is? I made 80+k last year and had lots of days off...

Oh... my professional relationships are the key to my success there. Unlike you; I like people. You’ve gone on and on about your dislike of people. I suggest rethinking your approach to your career.

Changing companies isn’t going to dramatically change your results. Starts with you.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

I’m gonna stay out of this 1 to a point your job isn’t gonna pay in trucking if you don’t make it work 1st thing gonna be your prob only gonna be home 4 days every month for the 1 st year!! You gotta try and put up high miles and on time delivery learn to call ahead if changes on delivery time is gonna be affected etc etc safety mileage all comes in to play if your not happy with the company I get it move on but be professional!!! Your list of wants are pretty far reaching in this business regardless of what you’ve read it’s gonna take more than 6 months to get what your looking for ... I get moving on if your not making a living and your meeting the criteria of otr so I’m not bashing you !! But most of the higher paid drivers earned their spot it wasn’t given to them

I'm curious. How did you come up with your decision to "move on?" I know you say you want a higher paying company. That's not what peaks my curiosity. I'm curious about your time line. How did you come up with the six month mark? Were you satisfied at three months? Why not give them a year? Surely there's still a lot you can learn. What triggered this at six months?

Your list of criteria is amazing. I mean you sound as if you have got something really special to offer somebody. Is there something special about you that makes you worthy of all those things you deem important? I have found that if I had something special to offer my trucking employer they treated me as if I was some coveted prize. They steadily increased my pay, kept me busy running the kind of routes I liked, and I never heard from them unless it was to tell me "Thanks, and here's some bonus money for you!" I've honestly never found myself looking for another trucking job. I changed companies one time in eight years. That was only because someone here at Trucking Truth talked me into contacting a recruiter who made me an incredible offer.

How are your relationships at Transam? People never seem to realize the importance of establishing a strong working relationship with their dispatcher. We can't ignore the power of that relationship. It can make or break us in this career.

Transam

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

How are you moving on with 6 months experience when you failed your CDL road test 4 months ago? If I read your previous posts correctly, you got your CDL without a 160 hour certificate. You're going to have trouble moving on because most companies willing to accept less than a year experience want a 160 hour certificate. My advice would be complete a year and see who will have you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Godsgift's Comment
member avatar

I failed my first road test but passed on my 2nd.

I'll be approaching the 6 month mark in March... just thought I'd start research now.

I've been doing fine w/ OTR and relationships...

Want to move to a different company since Transam was more of a starter company for me.

Current CPM is really low, so why wouldn't I move to a higher paying company?

It's not like they are going to compensate me apart from what their pay structure is, no matter how good of a job I do.

From my research thus far, I don't think the 160 hr certificate matters, as long as you have verifiable experience.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Why ask for advice if you have all the answers?

You have 4 months of experience...and you want to jump ship...

Stick with your first company for at least one year.

Done...

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More