I 35 W South Bound An North Bound Fort Worth To

Topic 29607 | Page 1

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Jammer a's Comment
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Y’all see that mess yet fed ex truck came in hot hit the pile up full speed horrible sad mess prayers to everyone

Jammer a's Comment
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100 vehicle pile up

PackRat's Comment
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There's a video online of that particular truck as it happened. I could only stand to see it once.

This has been a terrible winter for huge pileup disasters. So many accidents can be prevented if people would only slow down and pay attention. That goes for everybody.

Slow down, look ahead, listen to the CB, increase following distance, avoid distractions, get off the roads if possible, and just DRIVE the vehicle. Everything else can wait when behind the wheel, and that goes triple in bad weather coupled with traffic.

Prayers.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Well said man I agree 100 💯

There's a video online of that particular truck as it happened. I could only stand to see it once.

This has been a terrible winter for huge pileup disasters. So many accidents can be prevented if people would only slow down and pay attention. That goes for everybody.

Slow down, look ahead, listen to the CB, increase following distance, avoid distractions, get off the roads if possible, and just DRIVE the vehicle. Everything else can wait when behind the wheel, and that goes triple in bad weather coupled with traffic.

Prayers.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Ive seen the videos on this, and they were really impacting to me. Prayers for everyone involved. Forgive the possibly dumb question, but what would be best practices to avoid that situation? It keeps going through my mind of what measures I can put in place, like a threshold to have on when to shut it down because there is black ice or the possibility of it? Im assuming that what ever company Im working for would be receptive if I called into them and said, there is possibility of black ice here and I want to pull off? And how do you make that determination between "Well, the roads are just wet" and "there is a possibility of black ice present"

Anne A. (momcat)'s Comment
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My hubby/driver got home early last night.. and I was dang glad.

Who cares about the $ he didn't make, ya know?

He watched that with me.. and turned away. He does that when he gets teary eyed.

Be safe, y'all drivers.

I really regard y'all as family. . . . (and I wear my heart on my sleeve aboutchas!)

~ Anne ~

Jammer a's Comment
member avatar

Don’t drive when conditions are like that take the time find away around crowded areas or wait til later when traffic has gone

Ive seen the videos on this, and they were really impacting to me. Prayers for everyone involved. Forgive the possibly dumb question, but what would be best practices to avoid that situation? It keeps going through my mind of what measures I can put in place, like a threshold to have on when to shut it down because there is black ice or the possibility of it? Im assuming that what ever company Im working for would be receptive if I called into them and said, there is possibility of black ice here and I want to pull off? And how do you make that determination between "Well, the roads are just wet" and "there is a possibility of black ice present"

Errol V.'s Comment
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Dave, you can see in the video that you can travel as fast as you want on snow, frozen lakes and even on that treacherous black ice. The problem is that you really have no traction to steer or slow down. Most drivers do not underdtand the slickness and believe their were doing fine on that interstate. With they realized there was a problem ahead they wanted to stop, but had no traction on the wheels.

Remember when you were studying about braking: Perception, Reaction, Stopping? Well, having two out of three of these won't cut it.

The barriers on both sides of those lanes both made it worse by keeping all that crash energy within, and at the same time saved the outside lanes from getting clobbered.

You are the one on scene in your truck. You know what the road and traffic are like where you are. The weak point may be your understanding of yourself. Don't be stupid-brave and figure you can make it, whether it's fog, rain, fatigue or ice between you and your destination. Know yourself and your abilities, and make your own call about whether you are driving safe.

If you're dispatcher wants you to deliver your load "regardless", tell them your rather be late to the arrival than end up in a hospital. Yeah, tell them that!

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
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That was beautiful Errol. I was just thinking about responding to Davy's question. I'm going to keep my mouth closed though. I love your response. It is great to have you back in here!

PackRat's Comment
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+1 for Errol's perfect response!

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