Questions About Local Driving

Topic 29710 | Page 4

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Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

Who in creation is TODD once more?

Who is "in the driver seat" so to speak, the driver or the carrier? Yes, I do fantasize "being in the driver seat" in a sense. I hate it when bosses are always staring at me up close. I hate to be micromanaged as a worker too.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You are going to hate trucking too.

Primarily because of the time commitment. You will no longer have the time to do what it is you do best.

Don't kid yourself. There's not a soul here who gives any credibility to your comments.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
Who in creation is TODD once more?

Hmm, that's the exact question asked by one of your other aliases "Moose Holland" when called out here.

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I could dig for more, but why bother.

Your slip is showing, Todd.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

That's what I keep writing, Don't feed the TROLL. The TROLL is very predictable, as Turtle wisely illustrates.

Ignore the TROLL so maybe it will go away.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

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Aren't log books only required for interstate commerce? I figure many local jobs will be intrastate only.

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Where do you come up with this? It's not factual.

There is an exception to the ELD rule for a small number of local jobs. Drivers using this exception must be done working within 14 consecutive hours, must return to their original starting point, and must remain within a 150 air-mile radius from their starting point.

Another important thing to realize about most local jobs is that they aren't entry level jobs. They almost always require experience.

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I would hope that some employers would be sympathetic to older people who might seek local driving due to age considerations and understand that the long-haul stuff/sleeper crap is generally for the young and the bold.

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You are silly, and naive. Employers don't hire folks based on their sympathetic leanings. I guess I must be old and bold, but I am sure not lazy. I love the over the road lifestyle.

You will more than likely need some OTR experience to land a local driving job. Your career will benefit from that experience too. You better starve yourself for a couple of years before jumping into this career. That one year of OTR experience you are going to need is likely to ruin your health. That nasty food those toothless waitresses will be serving up at the truck stop is gonna cause you to balloon into a blimp and clog your arteries so bad that you won't be able to get any sympathy from those folks that are hiring for local jobs. I just don't know how you are going to do this. There are just too many barriers for you.

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I love all the comforts of home. Sleepers really ain't my style. What if I were to have documentation from my medical doctor to submit to prospective employers stating that he recommends a local position over an OTR position for health reasons and/or psychological reasons? Employers might have to be careful.

Bwahhahaha, why not bring a note from your wife or your mommy saying they want you home daily? Bwahhahaha

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate Commerce:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

You are going to hate trucking too.

Primarily because of the time commitment. You will no longer have the time to do what it is you do best.

Don't kid yourself. There's not a soul here who gives any credibility to your comments.

No trolling time for sure! But trolling pays no money. It pays no bills. Well, for now I'll sleep on this whole notion of being a "big-diesel jockey" for a spell. I would want to get into a non-driving motor carrier job eventually anyway as logistics manager then truly have valuable home time. I figure some steering wheel experience would lead to a trucking-industry 9-5 desk job with a "major leaguer" like Schneider or somebody. I have a college associates degree in computers already and that is also a boon for being a dispatcher , load planner or logistics specialist.

I want a German Shepherd of my own like Brett Aquila here has one day to walk through my Leave-It-To-Beaver neighborhood after work every evening. Even working a local driving job doesn't leave much valuable quality home time daily to properly raise, enjoy and train pet dogs. There is more to life than roaring diesel engines and traffic jams but as folks here seem to indicate it takes some gear-grinding to one day make the grade.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Don's Comment
member avatar

Get off the "pipe" and go do something useful with your life. Your trolling is getting boring.

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You are going to hate trucking too.

Primarily because of the time commitment. You will no longer have the time to do what it is you do best.

Don't kid yourself. There's not a soul here who gives any credibility to your comments.

double-quotes-end.png

No trolling time for sure! But trolling pays no money. It pays no bills. Well, for now I'll sleep on this whole notion of being a "big-diesel jockey" for a spell. I would want to get into a non-driving motor carrier job eventually anyway as logistics manager then truly have valuable home time. I figure some steering wheel experience would lead to a trucking-industry 9-5 desk job with a "major leaguer" like Schneider or somebody. I have a college associates degree in computers already and that is also a boon for being a dispatcher , load planner or logistics specialist.

I want a German Shepherd of my own like Brett Aquila here has one day to walk through my Leave-It-To-Beaver neighborhood after work every evening. Even working a local driving job doesn't leave much valuable quality home time daily to properly raise, enjoy and train pet dogs. There is more to life than roaring diesel engines and traffic jams but as folks here seem to indicate it takes some gear-grinding to one day make the grade.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

Get off the "pipe" and go do something useful with your life. Your trolling is getting boring.

double-quotes-start.png

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You are going to hate trucking too.

Primarily because of the time commitment. You will no longer have the time to do what it is you do best.

Don't kid yourself. There's not a soul here who gives any credibility to your comments.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

No trolling time for sure! But trolling pays no money. It pays no bills. Well, for now I'll sleep on this whole notion of being a "big-diesel jockey" for a spell. I would want to get into a non-driving motor carrier job eventually anyway as logistics manager then truly have valuable home time. I figure some steering wheel experience would lead to a trucking-industry 9-5 desk job with a "major leaguer" like Schneider or somebody. I have a college associates degree in computers already and that is also a boon for being a dispatcher , load planner or logistics specialist.

I want a German Shepherd of my own like Brett Aquila here has one day to walk through my Leave-It-To-Beaver neighborhood after work every evening. Even working a local driving job doesn't leave much valuable quality home time daily to properly raise, enjoy and train pet dogs. There is more to life than roaring diesel engines and traffic jams but as folks here seem to indicate it takes some gear-grinding to one day make the grade.

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Don, nobody is asking you to read my stuff. Don't you have some money to make, sir?

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Plumcrazy Preston's Comment
member avatar

As I was saying, I will think this whole thing over some more before judging this fine craft of gear-floating. Please drive carefully, slow down on greasy roads and be safe!! Trucking, like soldiering which I have been already, probably isn't for most people. Somebody's got to do it though.

Don's Comment
member avatar

I am making money as I text. You? You are "Plumcrazy" indeed if you think anyone is taking you seriously. You are right about one thing "Someone has to do it (this job), though." and I have serious doubts you ever will. At least you have some of the old stale Truckdriver slang down. Are you reading the Cliff notes version of l101 Truckin' Slang Words by Big Daddy Diesel?

As I was saying, I will think this whole thing over some more before judging this fine craft of gear-floating. Please drive carefully, slow down on greasy roads and be safe!! Trucking, like soldiering which I have been already, probably isn't for most people. Somebody's got to do it though.

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