Feasability Of Buying A Truck And Hiring Another Driver To Keep The Wheels Rolling - CDL But No Current Experience

Topic 29952 | Page 1

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Pale Rider's Comment
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Hello all - I have a Class A CDL but have not yet put it to use other than a couple of hundred miles OTR when I first got it in 2019. My DOT physical is current. I am interested to hear from anyone who started off with a CDL and zero experience but started their own company. This is my interest, and I am actively collecting industry data, personal accounts and advice, and business planning recommendations. I am open to any and all opinions and decent comments but ask for facts, not horror stories. While I am new to trucking, I am not new to life and have a good deal of military, manufacturing, and operational experience under my belt. In my draft business plan, I'd like to start with 1 truck and an experienced military veteran driver, working together as a team to keep the wheels rolling 24/7, then fairly quickly but a 2nd truck. I look forward to hearing from anyone who has done anything similar -- Thanks for your support.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Shadow Trucker's Comment
member avatar

Just Truckin on YouTube started his own authority right out of CDL School without any experience. So obviously it can be done successfully. I would recommend checking out his channel.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Never.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I always wanted to buy my own truck and then a fleet, when I did the math 4 years ago a owner opp can make what a decent company driver does with far more headaches. I do not realistically see how someone could afford to have one truck pay someone and break even let alone turn a profit.

Just out of curiosity what's a ballpark investment you where planning?

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

James H.'s Comment
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I would recommend you spend some time driving and getting first-hand experience of the industry before making that kind of capital investment. If your business plan makes sense, it will still make sense in a year or so, but you'll be better informed about how, and whether, to do this.

Banks's Comment
member avatar

You don't have the experience that counts the most. You're not interested in hearing it so I won't waste my time telling you.

From what I've seen, nobody likes teaming. They only do it to make money or because they already know their teammate. That means you have to compete with other trucking companies that pay very well for teams and offer benefits.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Possible yes, feasible probably not so much. Being the owner your experience level will be a big factor in your insurance rate. Employee’s records are taken into account secondarily. Your rate will be sky high. Also unless you have your own customer you won’t make enough to cover all the expenses on an employee. I would need to know much more about your 3-5 yr business plan to offer any specific suggestions.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you owned and operated a business of any type?

Shadow Trucker's Comment
member avatar

There is also another possibility to growing a successful freight business. I don't know your level of business experience, but this is what I am doing..

Start your own Brokerage Authority and start to let that Bonded Brokerage start to "Season" while you are building your carrier business. When the time comes and you have 2 trucks and a few good customers, when the customer demands exceed your 2 truck operation capabilities, you don't have to turn down any loads, in fact you can handle all of there loads, and you can broker those loads out to reputable carriers. That is how you make real money in the freight business.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The “Shadow” knows...

There is also another possibility to growing a successful freight business. I don't know your level of business experience, but this is what I am doing..

Start your own Brokerage Authority and start to let that Bonded Brokerage start to "Season" while you are building your carrier business. When the time comes and you have 2 trucks and a few good customers, when the customer demands exceed your 2 truck operation capabilities, you don't have to turn down any loads, in fact you can handle all of there loads, and you can broker those loads out to reputable carriers. That is how you make real money in the freight business.

Is that so... how do you know this? From YouTube? Please qualify your advice.

This forum is NOT intended to recommend and mentor new drivers to become O/O’s. In fact we will kick and scream to discourage anyone from taking that path. And for good reason. This is a commodity business, very, very difficult to turn even a modest profit without careful cost control and economies of scale. If it were that easy to make a killing as you described; we’d be way ahead of you.

Please offer your direct experience Shadow... not something you heard, saw or read on the interweb or from another person. Thank you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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