Just Failed Offset Backing Manuever...help

Topic 30162 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Dollie, the backing maneuvers can be tough, especially in a testing situation.

If you look here, I give a pictorial demonstration of the offset. It may not always work in a real world situation, but it'll hopefully get you through the examination. Of course it helps to have lots of practice first. Good luck!

Yeppers, with the tags & links!!

Turtle's thread is INDEED in that link I shared!! He and Rob D.'s banter (who is now someone Brody .. idk he changes his name often!) about the push trucks from a truck stop say SO much. I've got 2 on a shelf; but got a bit of real time training w/my other half. The toy truck is invaluable to learning, IMHO also.

Best wishes, all y'all!!

~ Anne ~

I dont think I would ever get in a truck after 4 weeks. I thought 4 months wasnt enough lol. When I get on the road I want to know EXACTLY what Im doing. Maybe Im just a chicken.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Sorry cant answer your question but I have a question. Your training was only 4 weeks? Im going for my training in a couple weeks and its 4 months. How can a tractor training school train you to drive a big rig in 4 weeks. Do you think that was enough training for you?

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Hi everyone, My name is Dollie, I'm 55 and have spent my life in business management but recently decided to change careers and become a trucker. I'm wondering if anyone has any tips to help me with backing maneuvers? I just completed a 4 week cdl school and took my skills test today. Backing has been a struggle for me as I have never even pulled any type of trailer before much less back one. The alley dock was what I was afraid of getting as I thought I had the offset and parrallels down but instead I failed my offset so I'm feeling pretty poorly right now. I know the setup but did something wrong cause I went into the lane too crooked. I tried pullups but never could get it to straighten out enough. Any help would be appreciated. I retest in 2 days. Thanks !!!

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Wow, both of those sound like FOREVER. When I went to CDL school they wanted me to test out after one week. I politely declined and went another week. I had only driven on the road twice in a 10 speed about 30-45 minutes at a time. With 3 days of backing practice at 4 people to a truck. I figured 1. I wasn't as comfortable with my driving as they apparently were and 2. I'm paying a ton of money for this class (even though employer sent me to it and was to be paid through 1 year working) so I wanted to at least feel like I was getting my moneys worth. So 4 weeks to 4 months, amazing!!!

double-quotes-end.png

Tammy, I wouldn't call you 'chicken' at all. The 'standard' for getting a CDLA certificate is 160 hours of class time. It comes with a certificate that will state...exacly that! :)

Seems that some schools draw it out, for more moolah, or .. accommodation for the 'already' working class, that needs to fit things in, over a period of time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

(cont'd...)

This is why, we recommend COMPANY PAID TRAINING !!

a.) You'll get your 160 certificate , and sure, OFTEN more time if needed at the company you choose.

b.) Upon PASSING, YOU'LL HAVE a JOB! (Paid back by weekly deductions, spread out broad.)

c.) Sure, they will ask you to work off your training debt, by staying with them for a year (or therabouts.) SO?!?!?

d.) Again, it's almost foolproof y'all!!

It's my plan in January, as well. So, here ya go, ladies & gents. I'm no professional, just married to one..and I've got my claws (and choices) in, come January!!

Paid CDL Training Programs

Apply For Paid CDL Training

AND in case anyone reads, now or in the future; please check out Brett's book here: (see if it IS really for you!!)

Best wishes~!!!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Tammy all these schools are teaching is basic competency to pass a state CDL exam. They aren’t teaching anyone to be a true truck driver. You will get more in depth training after getting a job. My school was 3 weeks and 9 days with a trainer.

It is a steep fast paced learning enviroment for sure. You will learn more and more once getting on your own. Just the way the business is structured. I’ve been driving almost 8 years and learn something everyday.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tammy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Im going to pay up front. I dont want to be stuck in a job I dont like just because I have to pay them back. I am getting a little worried now because everyone is saying basically 100% employment. This driving company told me they will help me get a job almost 100%. Its family owned and he told me they all have been truckers for years. The reviews are excellent so Im hoping!!! I KNOW I can do this job and do it well once I get some experience. Thank you all for the responses. God knows I need all the help I can get. This forum is a great find!

Tammy all these schools are teaching is basic competency to pass a state CDL exam. They aren’t teaching anyone to be a true truck driver. You will get more in depth training after getting a job. My school was 3 weeks and 9 days with a trainer.

It is a steep fast paced learning enviroment for sure. You will learn more and more once getting on your own. Just the way the business is structured. I’ve been driving almost 8 years and learn something everyday.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Tammy, with company paid training, the company is making an investment in you. You will be no more prepared from a 4 month school or a 4 week school. You will still need a company that trains new drivers. Like most of us the real training begins once you are out on your own.

Good luck.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Tammy's concern:

I dont want to be stuck in a job I dont like just because I have to pay them back.

Not to worry. As far as how well the various companies that offer Paid CDL Training Programs treat their drivers, they all want to keep you around, driving for them.

On this forum you'll meet members that have been driving for CFI, Prime Inc. Swift and others who got their jobs through company training. And they all proud of their companies.

Don't limit yourself.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tammy A.'s Comment
member avatar

The thing is everyone calling me is from another state. I cant take off to another state and train. Does anybody know of trucking companies in Mass. that train. I feel bad for this guy who I told I will go to his school but I would rather take advice from the people here. Now I know I have to train with a company who will hire and continue to train me after I get my CDL. So far the biggest lesson you guys/girls taught me. Back to square one uggg

Tammy's concern:

double-quotes-start.png

I dont want to be stuck in a job I dont like just because I have to pay them back.

double-quotes-end.png

Not to worry. As far as how well the various companies that offer Paid CDL Training Programs treat their drivers, they all want to keep you around, driving for them.

On this forum you'll meet members that have been driving for CFI, Prime Inc. Swift and others who got their jobs through company training. And they all proud of their companies.

Don't limit yourself.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I am not trying to pick at you, but I do like to try and make people think a little deeper. You said this...

I dont want to be stuck in a job I dont like just because I have to pay them back.

I always think it's odd when someone makes a statement like that. Here's what is odd about it. You also say that you want to pay up front.

So you are willing to go ahead and pay a considerable sum out of pocket and up front before you even know if you are going to like this or not, but you are not willing to let a company tell you that they like what they see in you and are willing to pay for your training, your food, and your lodging. All they want in return is a one year commitment.

There is no free lunch. You are going to pay out your money, or you are going to make a commitment. That commitment is vital to your success. You have already given yourself an out by knowing if you don't like the job you will just quit. That is sure to lead to you quitting and still being out all the money you paid for school.

You will actually need the commitment as a motivation to stick it out. I don't know any successful trucker who didn't want to quit about a hundred times during their rookie year. You will probably quit because you will feel the stress and the frustration of being a rookie. We all had some very bad days as rookie drivers. You already have an exit strategy which is a big mistake when embarking on a trucking career.

You need to commit. The best way to do that is to let the company invest their funds in you in exchange for your commitment. That is what I recommend for you.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I cant take off to another state and train.

Why not? They are going to pay for everything. How are you going to be a trucker if you can't take off to another state? That is what we do. I am in about four or five different states everyday.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Old School beat me to it. Over The Road trucking assumes you will be driving all over the USA. Anything less is "local" or"regional". Truth be told, local and regional jobs are harder to get for a rookie.

So leaving for your CDL training, in another state or wherever, is simply taking off/leaving for the road on your new career before you actually get paid to do it.

Tammy, this web site is not called Trucking Truth just because. We do get real, hoping to dispel pre-conceptions people have about the trucking lifestyle. And sometimes that reality might get uncomfortable.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Attending Truck Driving School Backing Challenges Becoming A Truck Driver Tips For Backing
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More