OTR Training After Being Local?

Topic 30471 | Page 1

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Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Say I got a local delivery or linehaul job...something like Sysco, US Foods, Oak Harbor Freight...etc... and got 6 months to a year experience, maybe more.

Then I decide I want to give OTR or a shot...

Would most companies still require me to do OTR training with a TE??

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

Say I got a local delivery or linehaul job...something like Sysco, US Foods, Oak Harbor Freight...etc... and got 6 months to a year experience, maybe more.

Then I decide I want to give OTR or a shot...

Would most companies still require me to do OTR training with a TE??

Garrett,

In my limited experience with the above; a buddy of my hubby's went from GFS to Garner (here in Ohio, he was aging out of all that 'handiwork' ...) he had to take a VERY abbreviated course/ride along with a trainer. Ten days. There ARE many differences between the two; ie: coupling, ELD's, time management (being #1,) and many more. This guy, being 5 years with GFS, even! In a combination t/t as well. It's probably the norm, but I can't say for sure.

Rob T. ... thoughts/advice?

Not sure about the LTL side, but most companies will accept OTR as 'experience' before they will accept the 'food service' guys, as experience.

LtL may be a different animal, all together. Bobcat Bob .... << paging you!

Hope this helps a lil' bit ~

~ Anne ~

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, definitely helps! That's what I was thinking. They are very different animals after all.

Thanks Anne

Greg H.'s Comment
member avatar

Most likely... There are different things you have to learn about different companies. Swift for instance, a company I use to work for requires you to learn how to operate their quallcom. I guess I spelled that correctly.

You'd have to go through a week of orientation or a few days and then go out with a trainer.

They have what are called macs (abbreviated) on their quallcom. You use them to send messages, 'arrived at shipper', arrived at stop, .... a butt load more different ones. Running late mac... etc. You have to learn all of these.

Not to mention OTR is a whole different world than local. They want to see how you deal with running OTR. Being out and away from home weeks/months at a time can get to you.

And if your not use to driving through mountains, you need to know how. You can learn it in a book, meh, the book will tell you how to, but it's a different world out there. Snow, wind storms.....

Anyway, different stuff.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Harry N.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys, I know that you're gonna go OTR for 6 weeks with a trainer. But, wanted to know where do I park my personal vehicle while being deployed? I have it on the street but 2x a month, they have street sweeping and plus when the pandemic happened, I didn't understand why my car was not working but a rep at a store shop told me that I have to drive it like every other day to keep the battery alive. I left it on the street for sometimes a good week or two. Do I have to pay a parking garage to have them keep the car for a month or two? How does it work? Thanks!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey guys, I know that you're gonna go OTR for 6 weeks with a trainer. But, wanted to know where do I park my personal vehicle while being deployed? I have it on the street but 2x a month, they have street sweeping and plus when the pandemic happened, I didn't understand why my car was not working but a rep at a store shop told me that I have to drive it like every other day to keep the battery alive. I left it on the street for sometimes a good week or two. Do I have to pay a parking garage to have them keep the car for a month or two? How does it work? Thanks!

I have generally the same questions. Apparently how it usually works is you either park your personal vehicle at a nearby drop yard the company uses, or a nearby truck stop, whichever is closer/more convenient. You will then get picked up by your trainer and dropped off a few weeks later.

However, a question I have yet to get a solid answer for is what happens when there is no drop yard or terminal within a reasonable distance of where you live- so you're forced to go the truck stop route. Personal vehicles parked at truck stops get towed after about 12 hours, so this option doesn't work.

I spoke to a Prime recruiter and she actually told me that if these options aren't feasible, your trainer will come pick you up AT YOUR HOME, like, literally roll up in front of your house, apartment, whatever... in a huge combination vehicle and pick you up like your their prom date. This I find simply hard to believe and was something she was just telling me so I wouldn't be discouraged from choosing Prime.

As for your battery, just unplug it while you're away. problem solved.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Greg M.'s Comment
member avatar

You guys are over thinking this. I am sure there is somewhere close by to where you live where you and your trainer can arrange to meet. If you can't or don't want to to leave your personal vehicle there have someone drop you off, take a cab/Uber etc.

double-quotes-start.png

Hey guys, I know that you're gonna go OTR for 6 weeks with a trainer. But, wanted to know where do I park my personal vehicle while being deployed? I have it on the street but 2x a month, they have street sweeping and plus when the pandemic happened, I didn't understand why my car was not working but a rep at a store shop told me that I have to drive it like every other day to keep the battery alive. I left it on the street for sometimes a good week or two. Do I have to pay a parking garage to have them keep the car for a month or two? How does it work? Thanks!

double-quotes-end.png

I have generally the same questions. Apparently how it usually works is you either park your personal vehicle at a nearby drop yard the company uses, or a nearby truck stop, whichever is closer/more convenient. You will then get picked up by your trainer and dropped off a few weeks later.

However, a question I have yet to get a solid answer for is what happens when there is no drop yard or terminal within a reasonable distance of where you live- so you're forced to go the truck stop route. Personal vehicles parked at truck stops get towed after about 12 hours, so this option doesn't work.

I spoke to a Prime recruiter and she actually told me that if these options aren't feasible, your trainer will come pick you up AT YOUR HOME, like, literally roll up in front of your house, apartment, whatever... in a huge combination vehicle and pick you up like your their prom date. This I find simply hard to believe and was something she was just telling me so I wouldn't be discouraged from choosing Prime.

As for your battery, just unplug it while you're away. problem solved.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Harry N.'s Comment
member avatar

Woah that's crazy! Hahah, yeah I hear you. I talked to them before but don't like that it's only OTR , I don't mind doing regional. Wow, thanks I didn't know that about the battery, will do that in the future!

I spoke to a Prime recruiter and she actually told me that if these options aren't feasible, your trainer will come pick you up AT YOUR HOME, like, literally roll up in front of your house, apartment, whatever... in a huge combination vehicle and pick you up like your their prom date. This I find simply hard to believe and was something she was just telling me so I wouldn't be discouraged from choosing Prime.

As for your battery, just unplug it while you're away. problem solved.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rubber Duck's Comment
member avatar

They might. Just get through it and get on your own🧜‍♂️

Say I got a local delivery or linehaul job...something like Sysco, US Foods, Oak Harbor Freight...etc... and got 6 months to a year experience, maybe more.

Then I decide I want to give OTR or a shot...

Would most companies still require me to do OTR training with a TE??

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Suicide Jockey's Comment
member avatar

When I trained at Prime I had two different students that I would pull up to their house to pick them up or drop them off for home time. One was in a tight area, so I'd leave the trailer at a customer and bobtail to his house.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

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