Help! CDL School Didn't Teach Me To Down Shift

Topic 30618 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Hello, i need some advice on what i can do about a CDL school i attended that didn't teach me to downshift. I currently completed the training for the school Aug. 6th 2021. Took a road test for a company on Aug. 11th and failed because i could not downshift properly. The school never taught me how to downshift. I called the school that day and they said for insurance purpose i could not get into one of their trucks. I talked to my instructor and he said he will see what he can do. I am planning on going there tomorrow to talk with them. Just wondering is there any action i can take if they wont follow up with teaching me the proper steps to downshift. Any advice would be greatly appreciated

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

Unless you signed a contract that they would teach you to downshift, I don't think there is anything you could do.

Your's is another example of why we recommend Paid CDL Training. Why pay for something you can get for free?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Banks's Comment
member avatar

How did you pass the state road test without downshifting?

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Did they really not teach you at all? Because I echo Banks question, how did you pass your exam with out being able to down shift?

Unfortunately shifting is difficult to teach over the internet, it's something you kinda have to do. Maybe the wise Errol can offer some tips since he is a instructor.

My advise would be to start slowing down till you hear the engine start to "chug", shift to neutral, bump throttle put in next lower gear, and repeat.

Unfortunately it will be difficult to do without practice.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Bobcat_Bob suggests:

Maybe the wise* Errol can offer some tips since he is a instructor.

These days all the fleet companies are switching to auto-shift. No need to double clutch.

My "wiseness" says test in an auto-shift so you don't need to worry, and you should get that CDL. True, you'll have an "auto only" restriction, but trust me, that don't amount to a hill of beans anymore.

*Ha!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I agree with Errol. Just go apply somewhere else. You honestly need to start your career at a major carrier and run OTR for a while. It is the best way to get yourself established at this. They are all going to be using auto-shift transmissions. I am sure you are trying to get something local or LTL. otherwise you wouldn't be road tested in a manual. The school took your money and got you a CDL. That was all they offered. They are not going to take you back and teach you more.

This is your first post here. Have you been reading here before? Why did you choose the path you did? I am sorry, but we see stuff like this so often. We try so hard to show people the safest path, the "best practices." It is always disturbing to see people in your situation. You laid out good money and you thought opportunity was wide open. Unfortunately you were unaware of the details. And you have limited yourself greatly.

Your question to us was...

i need some advice on what i can do about a CDL school i attended that didn't teach me to downshift.

The answer is nothing. There is nothing you can do about that school. Why did you choose them? Was it because it was the cheapest?

Your question should be, "I've got a fresh CDL, no experience, and no skill or knowledge. How is the best way for me to start a trucking career?"

If all you want to know is what you can do about the school, we can't help you. If you want to become a truck driver, we can help with that. Our advice may not be what you want to hear, but it will be solid and it will set you in the right direction.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Did they really not teach you at all? Because I echo Banks question, how did you pass your exam with out being able to down shift?

Unfortunately shifting is difficult to teach over the internet, it's something you kinda have to do. Maybe the wise Errol can offer some tips since he is a instructor.

My advise would be to start slowing down till you hear the engine start to "chug", shift to neutral, bump throttle put in next lower gear, and repeat.

Unfortunately it will be difficult to do without practice.

They really don't teach the students how to downshift. I passed by pure luck i guess, never needed to on my road test because every light turned red for me and i just stopped and reset.

Just came back from going up there and they let me practice for 3hrs which was cool. I did 7th to 6th to 5th to 4th to 3rd. Makes me wonder why they didn't just do that from day one. Oh well its in the past now, i have my class A CDL and looking for a job now. Your advice was spot on. After a while i could hear the truck chug and did exactly what you mentioned. Thank you

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

That's great to hear! I'm really glad they took some extra time to help you. I am surprised, but glad.

Banks's Comment
member avatar
I passed by pure luck i guess, never needed to on my road test because every light turned red for me and i just stopped and reset.

I've never heard of that. You can't just clutch and stop at red lights and pass. If that were the case, there would be no automatic restrictions.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

I agree with Errol. Just go apply somewhere else. You honestly need to start your career at a major carrier and run OTR for a while. It is the best way to get yourself established at this. They are all going to be using auto-shift transmissions. I am sure you are trying to get something local or LTL. otherwise you wouldn't be road tested in a manual. The school took your money and got you a CDL. That was all they offered.

Im understanding now from the research I've done that for fresh grads the best option is OTR, im fine with that i think. Not pressed on being local but that would help seeing i have a dog and a cat at home.

This is your first post here. Have you been reading here before? Why did you choose the path you did? I am sorry, but we see stuff like this so often. We try so hard to show people the safest path, the "best practices." It is always disturbing to see people in your situation. You laid out good money and you thought opportunity was wide open. Unfortunately you were unaware of the details. And you have limited yourself greatly.

I haven't been reading here for a while. Maybe a week, i chose this path because i have always been interested in trucking. Had a landscaping business for 12yrs that didnt work out so now its on to this. The school was the cheapest and that should have been my first red flag, reviews were good though. But it all worked out today i went up there and they let me practice with my instructor for 3hrs. Just posted ahead of time to see what i could have done if they told me to kick rocks. Thank you for your response!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More