Pay Rate On Driver's Pay Stubs?

Topic 30632 | Page 1

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Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been hired by Western Express and should be starting either Monday or Tuesday. However, I was speaking to a current driver at the yard and he told me that drivers' pay stubs there don't include the pay rate/cpm. Only miles driven for each load, total pay for each load, and grand total payout for the week are disclosed.

Is this abnormal? I suppose you could roughly figure out your pay rate with the information given, but still... just curious.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Based on what you said about your pay stub, you should be able to do the math and figure out CPM. Keep a DAILY written log of your miles, stops, loads, etc. This is important, even just for future use. Don't worry about CPM while you are a new driver. Just concentrate on your driving and backing until you get at least one year behind the wheel. CPM will take care of itself if you drive steadily and are safe (GOAL!)

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Garrett, every pay-stub I have seen from any trucking company is confusing. Western Express may be using a sliding scale pay on their loads. That just makes it more confusing, but back in the day when I worked for them I could always tell how my pay came out. They are not going to be trying to cheat you out of your pay. Be careful about what you hear from other drivers. They will have you so scared you will be wanting to quit during first two weeks. Get in there and do a really great job. You will figure out how to read your pay-stub and understand what you are getting paid.

I remember a driver quitting when I was there because he couldn't understand his pay-stubs. I showed him how it worked, but he didn't like the way it was done. There was nothing I could do for his insistence that it be done a certain way to satisfy him. You can't change the whole payroll system just to appease a driver who has his own ideas about how things should be done. He thought his request was reasonable, but they didn't. He quit over a petty little problem that was his own making.

When part of your pay is per diem , it just throws in some more confusion. Some people think getting per diem pay is great, but it distorts what it looks like you are getting paid per mile. They probably don't put it on there because it causes so much confusion. I honestly don't know how things are done over there now days, but I am sure you can figure out how to understand your pay after you get started. If not, we can help you.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Unless they've changed it since March of 2021 they indeed DO put the CPM on the check. It was probably a lease purchase driver you talked to. They get paid by the load so there is no cpm listed on their checks.

I've been hired by Western Express and should be starting either Monday or Tuesday. However, I was speaking to a current driver at the yard and he told me that drivers' pay stubs there don't include the pay rate/cpm. Only miles driven for each load, total pay for each load, and grand total payout for the week are disclosed.

Is this abnormal? I suppose you could roughly figure out your pay rate with the information given, but still... just curious.

0982603001629077962.jpg

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Garrett J.'s Comment
member avatar

Unless they've changed it since March of 2021 they indeed DO put the CPM on the check. It was probably a lease purchase driver you talked to. They get paid by the load so there is no cpm listed on their checks.

double-quotes-start.png

I've been hired by Western Express and should be starting either Monday or Tuesday. However, I was speaking to a current driver at the yard and he told me that drivers' pay stubs there don't include the pay rate/cpm. Only miles driven for each load, total pay for each load, and grand total payout for the week are disclosed.

Is this abnormal? I suppose you could roughly figure out your pay rate with the information given, but still... just curious.

double-quotes-end.png

0982603001629077962.jpg

Interesting...

He may have been a lease-purchase driver. All he told me was he was on his 2nd solo month. I'm going to try to get a definitive answer to this when I'm at the yard tomorrow.

Are you with Western, Mikey?

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Unless they've changed it since March of 2021 they indeed DO put the CPM on the check. It was probably a lease purchase driver you talked to. They get paid by the load so there is no cpm listed on their checks.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've been hired by Western Express and should be starting either Monday or Tuesday. However, I was speaking to a current driver at the yard and he told me that drivers' pay stubs there don't include the pay rate/cpm. Only miles driven for each load, total pay for each load, and grand total payout for the week are disclosed.

Is this abnormal? I suppose you could roughly figure out your pay rate with the information given, but still... just curious.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

0982603001629077962.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

Interesting...

He may have been a lease-purchase driver. All he told me was he was on his 2nd solo month. I'm going to try to get a definitive answer to this when I'm at the yard tomorrow.

Are you with Western, Mikey?

I was, for 2 years up until March 2021. Funny thing, I quit because at that .34 cpm I was maxed out. A month after I left they called me offering me .51cpm to come back. I politely declined as I am making more than that plus have an inverter and APU/EPU in my truck with my current company. Point being, you hear a lot of crap about Western Express but I had a really good experience with them and had they offered. 51 before I left I'd probably still be there.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

every pay-stub I have seen from any trucking company is confusing.

It looks like there is something positive about my company - a very simple and transparent pay-stub...

0776640001629127771.jpg

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

At knight we have a portal where we can check all the details on our checks and bonuses as well as detention and breakdown pay at any time. Very transparent and you can easily see your cpm. Its a sliding scale which sounds bad but its not, it means we get paid at a higher rate on shorter trips.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

At knight we have a portal where we can check all the details on our checks and bonuses as well as detention and breakdown pay at any time. Very transparent and you can easily see your cpm. Its a sliding scale which sounds bad but its not, it means we get paid at a higher rate on shorter trips.

In reality the sliding payscale usually sucks. You rarely get the shorter runs and the company doesn't feel so bad about their lower pay because they can always point to the sliding scale and claim it all balances out...which it usually doesn't.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Id say better than half of mine are shorter runs. So, we start at .44 cpm. I get a lot of .46 and .48 cpm runs. In addition, we get a production bonus from 1 to 4 cpm depending on how many miles we do and then a safety bonus if our smart drive is lower than 25 and we watch a safety video during the month. if I get the full bonus, it adds another 500 or so per month. I dont concentrate that much on the cpm though, there was a lot of other factors involved with my decision to go with Knight. Im very inexperienced, but I have a hunch that compensation works out about the same with most of the carriers for rookies though. But I also think if we hustle, we can make pretty good money even being a rookie.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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