45 Degree Alley Dock HELP

Topic 30828 | Page 2

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

By slow it down he meant use the clutch but I’m not sure how you would do that assuming you are in an automatic.

Just use the brake pedal the same as a clutch pedal. Usually I don't even touch the throttle, unless the dock is uphill. Idle speed will be enough, especially with an empty trailer.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

I heard many times that it is the tandems you need to look at. Personally, I don't get it at all. In my opinion, it takes the focus away from the trailer and can lead to a problem, because if you hit something, it will be done more likely with a trailer's corner, and not with a tandem. When I look in my mirrors or stick out my head and look back, I am looking at everything, this is how our eyes work, at least for me.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

It should go without saying you need to look beyond the tandems to make sure you’re not going to smack anything. But the point of looking at the tandems is to aim with them. Others say the corner of the trailer but I’ve found the most accurate reference of where the trailer is moving as a whole is in the tandems. I’m not able to just look at the trailer as a whole.

I heard many times that it is the tandems you need to look at. Personally, I don't get it at all. In my opinion, it takes the focus away from the trailer and can lead to a problem, because if you hit something, it will be done more likely with a trailer's corner, and not with a tandem. When I look in my mirrors or stick out my head and look back, I am looking at everything, this is how our eyes work, at least for me.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Nobody said to blindly follow the tandems without being aware of where the tail is going. The point being made is that the tandems tell the trailer where to go. Visualizing the tandems, and the arc they are following, greatly helps in getting the trailer in the hole correctly.

Bruce, the sweet spot of when to chase the trailer is elusive. It sounds to me like you are chasing a little too early. At the angle you are coming in, we're only talking a couple foot difference of when to start chasing. That can dramatically change your line.

As someone mentioned earlier, even a bad initial setup can be saved with minute adjustments as you're backing in. Your instructor should've showed you how to "jog or juke" the trailer over to where you need it to be.

All this really takes is a little practice. I'm sure you'll be fine, just take it slow and easy.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Ok Bruce, I just tried the 12 o'clock 9 o'clock etc method as you described and it worked nearly flawlessly. However, starting the chase when the tail met the imaginary line was bringing me in too deep, and I had to adjust my way in to avoid coming too close to my blind side.

On my 2nd attempt I started the chase at my rear tandem , and it came in perfectly centered. Then a simple straight back brought me the rest of the way.

I'm not sure where you lined up your rear drive tire to begin the maneuver, but mine was exactly on that imaginary line, which also put my driver door in the center of the second box to the right.

Sounds like you have it dialed in real close. I don't want to fill your head with different thoughts and maneuvers. Little tweaks are all you need. Don't overthink it.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Turtle, thanks for putting all that effort into determining why I'm having trouble. Above and beyond the call of duty!

I think your observations are correct and I will try to tweak my process. I'm not that far away. My instructor says I'm at a "5" in their scoring. I have to get to an "8" to pass. So, I need to improve about 20% or slightly more. Thanks again for all the help.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Bruce,

Don't forget about using the toy truck method we've talked about on here.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Bruce,

Don't forget about using the toy truck method we've talked about on here.

Yes. Thanks for the reminder!

Larry T.'s Comment
member avatar

I passed all my tests at Schneider, but failed the 45 degree alley dock. I have to re-take the test on Monday. Can anyone help me with some advice about this? All my setups are fine but I'm having trouble when I start backing in determining when to end the straight back and to start chasing the trailer. My instructor teaches differently than I originally learned and I'm not allowed to depart from his exact method, if that makes any sense. If I fail a second time, I will be sent packing.

They have stricter standards with "experienced drivers" than rookies at Schneider? No one has mentioned the great savior called "pull-up". My Schneider instructor was like take a million pull ups if needed. I suck at backing, I try to be a tad late on the 45 since it makes it easier to correct it with pull ups. It sounds like your instructor is a **** with wanting you to do it his way.

I had to do 1 day training for their DG account. They have you prefill out the backing eval form saying you passed before even taking it. I did the 45 by myself but had to be coached on the 45 blindside and 90. No big deal at all. lol.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks, Larry. No stricter standards for experienced drivers. But the time frame is condensed, therefore no practice time. They put us out there to test with no practice beforetime. I haven't driven or backed for 2 years, so I guess I'm their most inexperienced "experienced" student.

That being said, Schneider is bending over backwards to help me. They held me over for 3 additional days for extra training at their expense. Both my instructor and his direct supervisor have been very good to me by allowing this extended opportunity. I just hope I can live up to their expectations next week.

I believe that they believe I can be more that just another pretty face as a driver. Hehe.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 2 of 4 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Advice For New Truck Drivers Automatic Transmissions Backing Challenges
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More