Finding The Right Carrier. Manuals And Apus

Topic 31009 | Page 4

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Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar

You'll never regret having no restriction, but you may regret having it.

Exactly. This. ^^^^ .

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You'll never regret having no restriction, but you may regret having it.

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I will 100%, unequivocally, absolutely, NEVER regret having a manual restriction on my license. If it has some companies not willing to hire me, I don't want to work for them anyway.

That is me. Not everyone is the same.

Keep in mind; Tom works for a 'local'/intrastate company. Apples & Oranges to OTR , I guess... or not?!? If his assigned tractor is in the shop and the only loaner available (and usually IS, is the 2016 Int'l manual 10,) is standard, and he had the restriction, he stays 'home' a day, or two...involuntarily. Not having it has been beneficial, obviously.

He's been bounced to other yards in Ohio, to trade a broke down tractor guy with the restriction, to grab 'their' loaner . . . and gets paid a Benjamin to do so. Hasn't happened much if any lately, but . . . in the past, especially 'Covid times' ... often.

I know, who am 'I' to talk , no CDL ... but when I 'DID' drive on permit, it was 13's and 18's .... whatever Tom had, atm. I've driven the Int'l 10 a time or 2, and I agree...not what I'd consider the 'best' starter truck, with all 'else' to think about; but then again, ... choices!!!!!!!

Personally, I don't 'want' to be issued a manual, out the gate, if I do get to fulfill my dreams in 2022 . . . yet NOR do I want the restriction.

Peace, y'all!

~ Anne ~

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

There's no advantage, of course, to having a restriction on your license. But can anyone recall a driver that went to school and learned on an automatic and regretted it? I can't recall anyone who has.

Keep in mind, also, that if you have an "automatic transmission only" restriction on your license, all you have to do is sign up for a road test with the state and drive around for a few minutes proving you know how to shift. If you've driven for a while, I can't imagine it would take more than a little practice to become proficient enough to drive around town for five minutes at least as well as a student in school who is still trying to get their license, right?

Knowing what I know about the industry, I have no problem recommending a Paid CDL Training Program that trains drivers on automatics. If at some point you want to get the restriction removed, it would take very little time or effort to do so.

I'm noticing lately a number of very new drivers or soon-to-be drivers taking a firm stance about what they want from their career and what they'll accept or won't accept, even years down the road. Folks, I can promise that trucking is far different than you might expect, and you won't know what you'll want from your career early on. You may know some things that are important to you, like being home often with your family, and that's great. But don't try to predict what you'll be doing or where you'll be working several years into your career. You simply won't know until you see what trucking is like and what opportunities you learn of between now and then.

Instead, focus on surviving your first year in the industry. That's the hardest part of this career, and not a high percentage of people even make it that far. Stick with your first company for one full year and then decide what's right for you. If you want to change companies, go for it. After one full year of OTR experience, a ton of new opportunities will present themselves. Believe it or not, many of you will be thrilled right where you're at.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Why would you have to retire if assigned a manual, Bruce?

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Bobcat, I respect and admire the drivers that do manual. I wanted to drive a manual, but got assigned an automated truck. At my advanced age,69, I would retire if required to drive a manual. For me, that’s not ever going to happen. To those who drive a manual, stay safe To those who drive automated, stay safe

Bird 1, I can drive a manual, but at my age I want the easier option. I know I will never be asked to make a choice, but for an old guy like me, I love my automated transmission Frightliner.

double-quotes-end.png

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

There's no advantage, of course, to having a restriction on your license. But can anyone recall a driver that went to school and learned on an automatic and regretted it? I can't recall anyone who has.

Keep in mind, also, that if you have an "automatic transmission only" restriction on your license, all you have to do is sign up for a road test with the state and drive around for a few minutes proving you know how to shift. If you've driven for a while, I can't imagine it would take more than a little practice to become proficient enough to drive around town for five minutes at least as well as a student in school who is still trying to get their license, right?

Knowing what I know about the industry, I have no problem recommending a Paid CDL Training Program that trains drivers on automatics. If at some point you want to get the restriction removed, it would take very little time or effort to do so.

I'm noticing lately a number of very new drivers or soon-to-be drivers taking a firm stance about what they want from their career and what they'll accept or won't accept, even years down the road. Folks, I can promise that trucking is far different than you might expect, and you won't know what you'll want from your career early on. You may know some things that are important to you, like being home often with your family, and that's great. But don't try to predict what you'll be doing or where you'll be working several years into your career. You simply won't know until you see what trucking is like and what opportunities you learn of between now and then.

Instead, focus on surviving your first year in the industry. That's the hardest part of this career, and not a high percentage of people even make it that far. Stick with your first company for one full year and then decide what's right for you. If you want to change companies, go for it. After one full year of OTR experience, a ton of new opportunities will present themselves. Believe it or not, many of you will be thrilled right where you're at.

A year ago unthinkable, today even FedEx Freight will take on drivers with an auto only restriction. Of course they get ridiculed and hazed with tar and feathers, but they do get hired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

There's no advantage, of course, to having a restriction on your license. But can anyone recall a driver that went to school and learned on an automatic and regretted it? I can't recall anyone who has.

Keep in mind, also, that if you have an "automatic transmission only" restriction on your license, all you have to do is sign up for a road test with the state and drive around for a few minutes proving you know how to shift. If you've driven for a while, I can't imagine it would take more than a little practice to become proficient enough to drive around town for five minutes at least as well as a student in school who is still trying to get their license, right?

Knowing what I know about the industry, I have no problem recommending a Paid CDL Training Program that trains drivers on automatics. If at some point you want to get the restriction removed, it would take very little time or effort to do so.

I'm noticing lately a number of very new drivers or soon-to-be drivers taking a firm stance about what they want from their career and what they'll accept or won't accept, even years down the road. Folks, I can promise that trucking is far different than you might expect, and you won't know what you'll want from your career early on. You may know some things that are important to you, like being home often with your family, and that's great. But don't try to predict what you'll be doing or where you'll be working several years into your career. You simply won't know until you see what trucking is like and what opportunities you learn of between now and then.

Instead, focus on surviving your first year in the industry. That's the hardest part of this career, and not a high percentage of people even make it that far. Stick with your first company for one full year and then decide what's right for you. If you want to change companies, go for it. After one full year of OTR experience, a ton of new opportunities will present themselves. Believe it or not, many of you will be thrilled right where you're at.

double-quotes-end.png

A year ago unthinkable, today even FedEx Freight will take on drivers with an auto only restriction. Of course they get ridiculed and hazed with tar and feathers, but they do get hired.

Then they get spotted driving a day cab. Normal life is over at that point!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
A year ago unthinkable, today even FedEx Freight will take on drivers with an auto only restriction. Of course they get ridiculed and hazed with tar and feathers, but they do get hired.

Well, they trained such a massive percentage of new drivers on autos for the past 5+ years that companies hiring experienced drivers must adapt. They just don't have the pool to draw from that they used to. So training new drivers on autos is forcing the rest of the industry to follow suit with their equipment.

The autos are reliable enough now that it has become more a matter of preference than necessity, as it is with cars.

Kandyman's Comment
member avatar

As I havent drive since 2006, I never drove an automatic. I jumped into a buddy of mines dump truck about a year ago to see if I could still double clutch. I heard Terry from Future Truckers voice in my head "Clutch neutral clutch gear" I think I was moving around his companies yard on second try. This comment is about as relevant as the argument on this thread. rofl-1.gif Just having fun.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I may well one day go and get my restriction removed. Just for personal reasons. But rather than debating it. Doesn't it make the most sense, with as difficult as the first year is, and with how many that wash out before then, to give yourself every possible advantage to survive that year as easily as possible? For the purpose of getting your CDL , getting trained and making it a year accident free, why not take the simplest path, and then go get the restriction removed later.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

I may well one day go and get my restriction removed. Just for personal reasons. But rather than debating it. Doesn't it make the most sense, with as difficult as the first year is, and with how many that wash out before then, to give yourself every possible advantage to survive that year as easily as possible? For the purpose of getting your CDL , getting trained and making it a year accident free, why not take the simplest path, and then go get the restriction removed later.

That makes the most sense to me. I believe it's a condensed version of what Brett said.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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