Load Miles Calculation

Topic 31083 | Page 1

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CajunWon's Comment
member avatar

I thought I understood how companies calculate miles to compensate company drivers.

Households miles along route from the point you leave starting zip code until the point of entering destination zip code. That's what I thought anyway.

But that doesn't jive with a load where you stayed on the route established by the company provided gps, maybe total of 3 miles variance for parking and fuel. (would have more except only stopped once, instead of twice for fuel, avoiding an out of route stop to simply top off tank with 55gals. Drive 2,451 hub miles. Compensated for 2,225 load miles. Salt Lake City to Jacksonville, FL. To me that's significant, yet I'm fine with it, not complaining about the net compensation I'm receiving. Just would like to learn how it's calculated, and if this varies by company.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

There are several different ways companies use to calculate paid miles.

1. Hub miles, basically every mile driven.

2. Practical miles, essentially zip code to zip code.

3. Household goods or short miles, Essentially the same as practical mileage without taking into consideration any traffic, detours etc.

For those paid by the mile of course hub miles aka all miles driven is obviously the best however it is my experience that most companies pay based on practical mileage. This is great for the company by kind of sucks for the driver. This method has you running usually 8%-15% of all miles free. But that is often the industry norm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

Our are paid based on the suggested route, if I deviate, I just let my DM know and give a reason. For instance, Phoenix to Denver will route us up to 70 and then over. It's a bit longer to go 40 to 25, but easier drive in the winter, and 70 was closed at Glenwood for a while. So we would tell them that And they will get us the extra pay

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Yep that zip-to-zip thing is crap lol You can enter the delivery zip code, miles from actual drop point. Some companies do pay door-door, not many. Companies get a lil extra $, I guess well, they do have ALL the overhead to cover...Though your 226 mile difference seems a lot !

We had times we did a few trailer moves "city work" like for Fed-Ex, it was 6-8 miles but paid half that, I told our DM (jokingly) "What? it pays us the way the crow flies? Best and funniest move we did, was, we took an empty, from San Antonio to Miami, 1,200 miles ! then we bob tailed back from Miami to San Antonio

I had to call him to confirm this run, since it was 2,400 miles hauling NOTHING ! lol Yep, customer was paying for it for some "special thing" they were gunna do. Weird, since our drop off, had at least 5 empties already ! Oh well, moneys, money in our pockets.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
TCB's Comment
member avatar

Our are paid based on the suggested route, if I deviate, I just let my DM know and give a reason. For instance, Phoenix to Denver will route us up to 70 and then over. It's a bit longer to go 40 to 25, but easier drive in the winter, and 70 was closed at Glenwood for a while. So we would tell them that And they will get us the extra pay

I’ve been told that CR England doesn’t allow their drivers to drive the 70 through the Rockies during Winter.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Zip code to zip code is an antiquated system and should have gone away with the invention of GPS.

No reason every company can't use address to address mileage pay with all the available computer and GPS systems available.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

TCB,,,,,CRST don't allow use of I-70 West of Denver, EVER!! Guessing because, they've had problems/wrecks, before with drivers....(NO They don't hire the smartest people)

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Schneider used to use the ‘household mover’s guide’ mileage system, that archaic system from the 70’s, but this year changed over to ‘address to address,’ finally taking advantage of the GPS, which has made a lot of drivers happy.

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