My Awful Experience With Schneider National As Rookie.

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Isaily D.'s Comment
member avatar

Howdy Fellas, My Name Is De La Rosa, I'm not trying to be a Debbie downer here but I have had quite the time working with this company thus far. I'm based out of Washington state. Graduated around August of this year with my CDL , few endorsement here and there. No luck, till I got hired with Schneider. Training was good, I was away from home for a month for training. Then they assigned me to pretty crappy truck with 400k Miles. Pretty Hesitant to drive it I pointed it out to maintenance/mechanics, they did very little.to help me.. The truck broke down 2 twice, the transmission went out on a downgrade, I can only imagine if it was winter time and who would have died If were pulling 80k gross and that transmission stopped working. I was Stuck in Reno making pennies and looking homeless, Pretty sketchy stuff if you ask me. They forgot my home time so I was away another month on the road. I only made one decent paycheck of 1400$ after tax. That's after 2500 miles or a week or so. Most of the time I was just either sitting around or wasting time moving empties when local guys should be doing that in L.A, it's been headaches with the shippers, not wanting to release loads or my truck not working. my DBL is an a**hat. 400$ a week isn't working for me. Any help/suggestions or other carriers you guys recommend? I don't mind going through orientation again even though I been solo driving for month and half, how inconsistent schneider is driving me insane.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

I feel like we're not getting the full story here. This job is what you make it. If you hustle, are easy to work with, manage your HOS properly, safe and on time there is no reason you shouldn't be making money.

As for the truck with 400k... who cares? You're a company driver (I suspect) and they pay maintenance. Your transmission went out on a down grade and it sounds like you survived, so you must have used your brakes because, well, that's what they're there for. Trucks break... my buddy's brand new P4 blew its main seal 200 miles out of the yard. My 2020 P4 had an air flow sensor go out, the transmission wiring harness had to replaced after getting stuck between gears on Donner, and my SCR system died when the DEF pump failed.. all required dealer down time, and there have been other issues here and there that have put me in the terminal shop.

Calling your DBL names on a public forum is generally ill advised. Schneider is a legit company, so a personal reflection is probably in order here. Jumping carrierd so quick doesn't look good. Good luck to you.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

If you are looking for my honest opinion, here goes. You need an attitude adjustment. Yours sucks. Id bet a weeks pay that your DBL is telling his coworkers "that De La Rosa is an a$$hat" and as far as the truck, you do realize there are plenty of people driving trucks with several million mile on them right? If you are disappointed with $1400 take home for a mere 2500 miles then you are probably not gonna make it. 2500 is the low end of an average week.

Most of what you've mentioned is just how this job is. We all deal with it. You will find the same problems at any company you go to. Jumping ship after 1.5 months is not gonna look good to a potential future employer. My recommendation? Stick it out and change your attitude or look for another line of employment. Trucking is a strange job chocked full of inconsistencies and challenges. It will be the same 10 years down the line.

I have a new 2022 Freightliner and at 39,000 miles I spent a day and a half broken down at a dealer. It happens.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

Miles don't mean anything. The first truck with my current company had 650k, and it was a great truck, so good, that the boss gave it back to a more experienced guy who was on a long vacation when I came. So I was given another truck, a 2016 Volvo with only 320k. Also nice, but I do miss that table!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

My ever-faithful "Irene" has been in the shop for at least 10 days over the past two months. Many mechanical issues since we surpassed 420,000 miles, and now at 440,000, our time to part ways is quickly approaching. I will curse that day since this has been the finest company tractor I've ever been assigned.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

No luck, till I got hired with Schneider/blockquote>

This comment right here,is exactly why you need to man up and stick it out dude. Don't think jumping ship so soon won't make your luck better after 1.5-2 months. It will make it even that much harder finding a new gig elsewhere. Don'tknow where you went to "School" but I'm almost thinking, to a private one?

I'm just not seeing it being easier finding someone else to bring you on with that little bit of drive experience. Good luck in what ever choice you make, I'd stay where you are, get more experience under your belt, like 1 full year, THEN maybe look someplace else to drive, increases your odds a little better.

Stevo Reno's Comment
member avatar

Well I screwed that quote block, up hahaha thought it didn't look right grrrrr

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Well I screwed that quote block, up hahaha thought it didn't look right grrrrr

Use the "Preview" button before posting. If it's not showing what you like, hit "Cancel", change it, then "Preview" as many times as necessary.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Kerry L.'s Comment
member avatar

Howdy Fellas, My Name Is De La Rosa, I'm not trying to be a Debbie downer here but I have had quite the time working with this company thus far. I'm based out of Washington state. Graduated around August of this year with my CDL , few endorsement here and there. No luck, till I got hired with Schneider. Training was good, I was away from home for a month for training. Then they assigned me to pretty crappy truck with 400k Miles. Pretty Hesitant to drive it I pointed it out to maintenance/mechanics, they did very little.to help me.. The truck broke down 2 twice, the transmission went out on a downgrade, I can only imagine if it was winter time and who would have died If were pulling 80k gross and that transmission stopped working. I was Stuck in Reno making pennies and looking homeless, Pretty sketchy stuff if you ask me. They forgot my home time so I was away another month on the road. I only made one decent paycheck of 1400$ after tax. That's after 2500 miles or a week or so. Most of the time I was just either sitting around or wasting time moving empties when local guys should be doing that in L.A, it's been headaches with the shippers, not wanting to release loads or my truck not working. my DBL is an a**hat. 400$ a week isn't working for me. Any help/suggestions or other carriers you guys recommend? I don't mind going through orientation again even though I been solo driving for month and half, how inconsistent schneider is driving me insane.

Lots of companies are hiring for warehouse work.

Schneider National is a good company that wants its drivers out on the road running miles with freight being hauled. If you were having that much trouble with Schneider, it's not going to be any better at any other company. It sounds like there were communication problems. That's not going to change by switching companies, if you contributed to the communication problems.

A change in attitude, not a change in companies is what's in order.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Davy A.'s Comment
member avatar

I was out of my Edna for a month or more in loaners due to a qls sensor issue. I lived. Some of the loaners we're rode hard and put away wet. I produced in them all the same. I made some funny reviews of their design features and got paid all the same .

I'm a pretty big proponent of what can I do to change the outcome? As was said, if you are looking at problems with the company, look inward first.

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