Safe Wind Speed

Topic 31210 | Page 3

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Just 'G''s Comment
member avatar

Not to hijack this thread, but it seemed to appropriate to justify starting a new one.

I just got scheduled for my CDL exam on Thursday in Marinette, WI. The problem is the current NOAA forcast for Thursday calls for a west wind of 21 to 30 mph, with gusts as high as 46 mph. Obviously, for a CDL exam we'll be hauling empties and pretty much the only 4 lane highway to use goes mostly north-south, so that will be a cross wind.

How worried should I be?

Thanks,

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Not to hijack this thread, but it seemed to appropriate to justify starting a new one.

I just got scheduled for my CDL exam on Thursday in Marinette, WI. The problem is the current NOAA forcast for Thursday calls for a west wind of 21 to 30 mph, with gusts as high as 46 mph. Obviously, for a CDL exam we'll be hauling empties and pretty much the only 4 lane highway to use goes mostly north-south, so that will be a cross wind.

How worried should I be?

Thanks,

Have your instructors addressed this? Surely this can't be the first time they've tested in high winds. Perhaps they use a different test route?

It could actually benefit you. Wind of that strength would cause you to slow down giving you more time to react as long as you inform your examiner why you're doing what you're doing so they don't ding you for impeding traffic. If you do the road test make sure you're taking curves and turns nice and easy.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Just 'G''s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Not to hijack this thread, but it seemed to appropriate to justify starting a new one.

I just got scheduled for my CDL exam on Thursday in Marinette, WI. The problem is the current NOAA forcast for Thursday calls for a west wind of 21 to 30 mph, with gusts as high as 46 mph. Obviously, for a CDL exam we'll be hauling empties and pretty much the only 4 lane highway to use goes mostly north-south, so that will be a cross wind.

How worried should I be?

Thanks,

double-quotes-end.png

Have your instructors addressed this? Surely this can't be the first time they've tested in high winds. Perhaps they use a different test route?

It could actually benefit you. Wind of that strength would cause you to slow down giving you more time to react as long as you inform your examiner why you're doing what you're doing so they don't ding you for impeding traffic. If you do the road test make sure you're taking curves and turns nice and easy.

I brought it up as soon as they gave out the test schedule, and was told we were testing regardless. We've been given some unofficial hints that that is the preferred route. Obviously, a lot can change in 2 days including the forecast and the route. I'm not really from the area so I can't speak to normal weather conditions.

I was just a little suprised since the Safety and Training departments are pretty much the same. I just expected a little more concern.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

After boasting about how much better flatbed is in the wind I guess I put my foot in my mouth because I’m sitting here at a Home Depot and they won’t unload me yet because of the wind. Luckily this load wasn’t tarped or I think the tarp would’ve blown me away if I tried to take it off in this

Just 'G''s Comment
member avatar

Just a follow up for my question.

We had a little more discussion today about the wind conditions for the CDL test and I'm feeling better. Apparently, we're sticking to pretty wooded areas which will keep things manageable at ground level. I also don't test until 1300, so I'll probably try the highway in my car in the morning and see how it feels.

At any rate I'm done worrying until the time comes.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Well, I am shut down for the third time in four days, either in Colorado or Wyoming. This month of December has been brutal for driving out here. Three more weeks and I'm finished here, though.

Don's Comment
member avatar

Are you referring to this past Saturday? I was in NE Ohio, and the wind was really bad. I was returning to Wooster on 75South and 30East with an empty dry van and had to stop twice because the winds.

Is there such thing as a safe wind speed? I know, that flipping a dry van is a complex multi-factor event, but still, measuring in mph? Today I was driving east on US-30 in Indiana and Ohio, there was a wind warning, and I could feel it even with a 43,000 lbs load... The wind ripped the flag at a rest area, it was probably 30-40 mph...

0281420001639274827.jpg

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Trucker Chris (CK)'s Comment
member avatar

I had to shut down to wait for the storm to pass yesterday. Saw a funnel cloud, wind hit me at 80-100mph while parked, and if I wasn't angled the way I was I would have been blown over. Penny sized hail, sirens wailing, the rain was sideways, dirt lot was under inches of water, and the truck was leaning so far over I thought it was going to flop. I had no where to seek shelter.

0673305001639664339.jpg

0636442001639664428.jpg

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Https://apple.news/A40HHRC-YQfyspw3q6GAwTA

Just saw this article this morning. Apparently it was worse than I thought yesterday all over the place.

Pacific Pearl's Comment
member avatar

Blow overs aren't the only high wind hazard. A combination of slick spots (ice) and high cross winds can blow your truck sideways even if your truck would be perfectly safe with either the icy spots or the wind gusts separately. The combination of reduced traction and the side of your trailer acting as giant sail can turn your truck 90 degrees in a heartbeat. Your truck will now be facing the edge of the road, but the wheels are still spinning forward. Whatever traction you had when your wheels were safely in the ruts of the road has been replaced with the icy spots on the less traveled parts of the road. There will be an urge to oversteer as your truck keeps getting closer to the edge of the road before you regain traction, but that will just turn your truck sharply if/when you do regain traction and your truck will now be facing the other side of the road. That is, if your overcorrection didn't cause your truck to flip on its side. I've seen this happen on I-80 - more than once!

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