Western Express As A Company?

Topic 31323 | Page 4

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Andrey's Comment
member avatar

I would disagree with a statement that no company can adequately train a new solo driver. Even considering how broadly the word "adequately" can be understood, I can still say that after three weeks of school and a month of OTR training at Roehl I was 100% ready to start driving solo.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Western Express hasn't gotten to the size they are by being a crappy place to work. They're willing to hire new and experienced drivers that many other carriers decline whether it's their driving, criminal, or employment record. As a result they do tend to pay lower INITIALLY until you prove your worth. They have many million mile drivers that could go anywhere yet they continue to stay with W.E. Why would they do that to work for such a "terrible" company. Often times it comes down to drivers attitude and willingness to be a team player. You're not going to be happy with every load but it all evens out in the end. Of course we may also end up with a dispatcher or load planner that isn't the greatest at their job. We all start somewhere and there's growing pains unfortunately. Just because your ONE dispatcher of the dozens, or hundreds they have sucks doesn't mean they're all terrible and the company sucks. We have members here that did quite well at W.E. and others that had the complete opposite experience.

My advice to the O.P. is the same as I'd offer for ANY company. Apply to many that offer what it is you're looking for. Dig deeper into those that have what you're after and see what benefits, schedule, pay etc better aligns with what you want.

It amazes me how when these carriers are willing to give a driver a chance the person is extremely grateful. Within a couple short weeks all of a sudden it's a terrible place to work. No company is perfect. I stuck with the company that gave me an opportunity to get my CDL and begin my career for nearly a year and a half. It got to a point I no longer was happy there and decided to look elsewhere. You know what I did? Behaved like a professional adult by telling them I was going a different direction, and expressed my gratitude for the opportunity. You know what I didn't do? Get on here and badmouth them every chance I get. Although things didn't work out long term that doesn't mean it's a bad place to work. The last couple months have been somewhat irritating with where I am now. I've talked to several people in management about the issues so I better understand what's happening. It's still frustrating but atleast I know there's a light at the end of the tunnel and it isn't the train. At both my current and previous employer they have numerous drivers with over 30 years in that could go anywhere. The same could be said for nearly every company out there in any industry. Not all support staff you deal with is perfect. I can guarantee if we were to ask the company about the driver they'd be able to show times your performance was less than stellar.

Twosides you'd better find a way to make it work at Knight. If I'm not mistaken you had trouble getting anybody to bring you in after being sent home from TMC. How eager do you think companies will be to bring you in when they see you were sent home from TMC for inconclusive drug screen (your fault or not), and that you resigned from Knight after a couple short weeks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

Well you definitely do not know what your talking about when it comes to me, so dont act like you know me or what i am saying, thank you. On top of that, when I worked for Western Express Inc., they treated drivers like animals and that came from current and former employees so, and on top of that, many western expressers came to Melton because of their own experience with that company. Sorry not sorry, they are terrible. Some companies deserve their reputation full stop. Now Swift, I will say is fantastic when it comes to treatment of drivers and the only thing they need to work on is training qaulity. Thats it. Would be nice if they pushed the speed up to 68 but thats from a traffic perspective.

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Personally I would steer clear of Western Express from my and others experience they treat their drivers pretty poorly and they also do not train the best as far as flat bed goes. I have spoken with at least 5 others who had that same experience.

Personally from my view and what I have seen so far, I would go for Maverick and Melton and Prime, they treat their drivers well and Melton like gold😊😊. Have a grand day and adventure!

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Hey everybody,

So I'm an in experienced CDL-A holder. I've decided I'd like to do regional flatbed. I want to be home every weekend and I like the idea of flatbed being more "physical", so I can move the body more. That being said, I'm looking at Western Express because they offer regional. Melton seemed way more professional to me, but they ONLY OFFER OTR. Anyway, just wanted to pick all of your brains about Western Express. I don't know if I'll be there the next 30 years, but I'm a firm believer in "its what you make of it", so I think its a decent starting point. I just don't know what to believe with everything you read online and the you tube reviews and such. I've seen some unhappy people and some happy people! Anyway, any advice, tips, or feedback would be much appreciated!

Thank you Bobby

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Funny how so many of you are suddenly experts on which successful companies are horrible at training and treatment of employees after talking to a few terminal rats and losers.

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To this i reply,

OH. BOO. HOO.

I stand by my statement.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

You are the only driver I know making a statement like that. If what you say is true it has more to do with your ability to adapt and absorb a very steep learning curve. Correct me if I’m wrong, but didn’t you have a mishap? It’s okay, inevitable, however that in of itself supports my point.

Again it’s impossible to cover every possible challenge and variable a rookie driver is potentially challenged with.

Peace.

I would disagree with a statement that no company can adequately train a new solo driver. Even considering how broadly the word "adequately" can be understood, I can still say that after three weeks of school and a month of OTR training at Roehl I was 100% ready to start driving solo.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13Momcat)'s Comment
member avatar
Again it’s impossible to cover every possible challenge and variable a rookie driver is potentially challenged with.

Indeed.

Well said, G.

Victor Jamie went thru hell & back with Western. Some of us recall; some of y'all weren't around yet, then. Read his past diaries. He's speaking from HIS experience. Experiences are personal, and can & WILL vary. Kinda like the ole' "YMMV" acro!

Personally, I'm glad to see him back and thriving.

~ Anne ~

0444709001641761689.jpg

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rob T’s reply to Victor... YES! Totally, 100% on point.

Western Express hasn't gotten to the size they are by being a crappy place to work. They're willing to hire new and experienced drivers that many other carriers decline whether it's their kdriving, criminal, or employment record. As a result they do tend to pay lower INITIALLY until you prove your worth. They have many million mile drivers that could go anywhere yet they continue to stay with W.E. Why would they do that to work for such a "terrible" company. Often times it comes down to drivers attitude and willingness to be a team player. You're not going to be happy with every load but it all evens out in the end. Of course we may also end up with a dispatcher or load planner that isn't the greatest at their job. We all start somewhere and there's growing pains unfortunately. Just because your ONE dispatcher of the dozens, or hundreds they have sucks doesn't mean they're all terrible and the company sucks. We have members here that did quite well at W.E. and others that had the complete opposite experience.

My advice to the O.P. is the same as I'd offer for ANY company. Apply to many that offer what it is you're looking for. Dig deeper into those that have what you're after and see what benefits, schedule, pay etc better aligns with what you want.

It amazes me how when these carriers are willing to give a driver a chance the person is extremely grateful. Within a couple short weeks all of a sudden it's a terrible place to work. No company is perfect. I stuck with the company that gave me an opportunity to get my CDL and begin my career for nearly a year and a half. It got to a point I no longer was happy there and decided to look elsewhere. You know what I did? Behaved like a professional adult by telling them I was going a different direction, and expressed my gratitude for the opportunity. You know what I didn't do? Get on here and badmouth them every chance I get. Although things didn't work out long term that doesn't mean it's a bad place to work. The last couple months have been somewhat irritating with where I am now. I've talked to several people in management about the issues so I better understand what's happening. It's still frustrating but atleast I know there's a light at the end of the tunnel and it isn't the train. At both my current and previous employer they have numerous drivers with over 30 years in that could go anywhere. The same could be said for nearly every company out there in any industry. Not all support staff you deal with is perfect. I can guarantee if we were to ask the company about the driver they'd be able to show times your performance was less than stellar.

Twosides you'd better find a way to make it work at Knight. If I'm not mistaken you had trouble getting anybody to bring you in after being sent home from TMC. How eager do you think companies will be to bring you in when they see you were sent home from TMC for inconclusive drug screen (your fault or not), and that you resigned from Knight after a couple short weeks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

You are the only driver I know making a statement like that. If what you say is true it has more to do with your ability to adapt and absorb a very steep learning curve. Correct me if I’m wrong, but didn’t you have a mishap?

Well, I am indeed a good learner, but overall I stand by Roehl - the CDL training I received in Marshfield, WI was very good, and what I learned from my trainer was even better. I am surprised to read about trainers who sleep while their students drive. My trainer never did that, he answered every question I had, he guided me through every possible aspect of trucking (relevant to my regional dry van fleet) except chains... I did had an incident at a parking lot and was fired because of that, but it was definitely not a result of poor training - rather a combination of my overall lack of experience and bad luck. I remember my first solo load very well, I felt completely confident about what needs to be done - which is, I guess, a solid indicator of a good training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Anne, I know you and my dear Grandparents know what hell and abuse honestly I went through at Western Express and their equipment can use some major attention many times. But to Rob and Gtown, both of you have an opinion that seems at least to me to be found and unfounded at the same time. You claim I am the flawed but I have spoken to many who are great employees at Melton who have given the wave goodbye to Western Express because they treat drivers like 2nd hand used trucks. Now I am be humble enough to admit, that there are some good driver managers, I got two dim witted and false accusing only concerned about their reputation and national average driver managers.

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Again it’s impossible to cover every possible challenge and variable a rookie driver is potentially challenged with.

double-quotes-end.png

Indeed.

Well said, G.

Victor Jamie went thru hell & back with Western. Some of us recall; some of y'all weren't around yet, then. Read his past diaries. He's speaking from HIS experience. Experiences are personal, and can & WILL vary. Kinda like the ole' "YMMV" acro!

Personally, I'm glad to see him back and thriving.

~ Anne ~

0444709001641761689.jpg

Rob T’s reply to Victor... YES! Totally, 100% on point.

double-quotes-start.png

Western Express hasn't gotten to the size they are by being a crappy place to work. They're willing to hire new and experienced drivers that many other carriers decline whether it's their kdriving, criminal, or employment record. As a result they do tend to pay lower INITIALLY until you prove your worth. They have many million mile drivers that could go anywhere yet they continue to stay with W.E. Why would they do that to work for such a "terrible" company. Often times it comes down to drivers attitude and willingness to be a team player. You're not going to be happy with every load but it all evens out in the end. Of course we may also end up with a dispatcher or load planner that isn't the greatest at their job. We all start somewhere and there's growing pains unfortunately. Just because your ONE dispatcher of the dozens, or hundreds they have sucks doesn't mean they're all terrible and the company sucks. We have members here that did quite well at W.E. and others that had the complete opposite experience.

My advice to the O.P. is the same as I'd offer for ANY company. Apply to many that offer what it is you're looking for. Dig deeper into those that have what you're after and see what benefits, schedule, pay etc better aligns with what you want.

It amazes me how when these carriers are willing to give a driver a chance the person is extremely grateful. Within a couple short weeks all of a sudden it's a terrible place to work. No company is perfect. I stuck with the company that gave me an opportunity to get my CDL and begin my career for nearly a year and a half. It got to a point I no longer was happy there and decided to look elsewhere. You know what I did? Behaved like a professional adult by telling them I was going a different direction, and expressed my gratitude for the opportunity. You know what I didn't do? Get on here and badmouth them every chance I get. Although things didn't work out long term that doesn't mean it's a bad place to work. The last couple months have been somewhat irritating with where I am now. I've talked to several people in management about the issues so I better understand what's happening. It's still frustrating but atleast I know there's a light at the end of the tunnel and it isn't the train. At both my current and previous employer they have numerous drivers with over 30 years in that could go anywhere. The same could be said for nearly every company out there in any industry. Not all support staff you deal with is perfect. I can guarantee if we were to ask the company about the driver they'd be able to show times your performance was less than stellar.

Twosides you'd better find a way to make it work at Knight. If I'm not mistaken you had trouble getting anybody to bring you in after being sent home from TMC. How eager do you think companies will be to bring you in when they see you were sent home from TMC for inconclusive drug screen (your fault or not), and that you resigned from Knight after a couple short weeks.

double-quotes-end.png

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Rob T and Gtown, yes I can improve and here at Melton, I have really improved on many attitudes and mentality to strive to be better at open deck my end goal is RGN and Specialized hauling. You have much wisdom and I will take all into consideration.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Victor... there is no need to bad mouth Western Express. It’s beneath you...

Rob T and Gtown, yes I can improve and here at Melton, I have really improved on many attitudes and mentality to strive to be better at open deck my end goal is RGN and Specialized hauling. You have much wisdom and I will take all into consideration.

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