How To Handle Discrepancy With Pay From Employer

Topic 31325 | Page 5

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TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
That decision is completely yours. My knowledge of trucking tells me that you will be disappointed with your training wherever you go. There is no way to cover every single kind of flatbed load during a week's worth of training. I don't know of any companies who spend more than four or five days on securement training

I was mistaken, I thought a company like Maverick or P&S would spend quality time teaching load securement. That is the reason I'm thinking about going to another company. TMC did 2 weeks classroom/pad and 4-6 weeks OTR with an actual flatbed driver, but you know that...I know their drivers are very prepared for different situations.

I have no problem learning on my own but with this it seems dangerous to do so. IMO, Learning how to back a spread axle trailer on my own is completely different than learning load securement on my own. But I will continue to do research every night and study the ins and outs of flatbed driving.

Thank you for your thoughts on the per diem. That was exactly what I was thinking when I read into it. For me, I just don't see the benefit of it....

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

That decision is completely yours. My knowledge of trucking tells me that you will be disappointed with your training wherever you go. There is no way to cover every single kind of flatbed load during a week's worth of training. I don't know of any companies who spend more than four or five days on securement training

double-quotes-end.png

I was mistaken, I thought a company like Maverick or P&S would spend quality time teaching load securement. That is the reason I'm thinking about going to another company. TMC did 2 weeks classroom/pad and 4-6 weeks OTR with an actual flatbed driver, but you know that...I know their drivers are very prepared for different situations.

I have no problem learning on my own but with this it seems dangerous to do so. IMO, Learning how to back a spread axle trailer on my own is completely different than learning load securement on my own. But I will continue to do research every night and study the ins and outs of flatbed driving.

Thank you for your thoughts on the per diem. That was exactly what I was thinking when I read into it. For me, I just don't see the benefit of it....

Not to discourage you but why don't you quit trucking and get a job where they tell you everything to do with a boss standing over you? I honest think that's what kind if job you are meant for.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

TwoSides replied to OS:

Thank you for your thoughts on the per diem. That was exactly what I was thinking when I read into it. For me, I just don't see the benefit of it....

There isn’t a benefit to the driver.

TwoSides... I hope you can get this to work there. You seem smart enough to handle the challenges and avoid unnecessary risks.

Good Luck! 👍

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Victor... IMO this is not the time to encourage TwoSides to jump ship.

I honestly hope he can work it out at Knight. First group through new training can make a positive impact on their company’s future, becoming part of the solution and not exacerbating the problem. TwoSides is smart enough to get through this and likely benefit greatly as a result.

Thanks G-town. You are correct, I am smart enough to get through this. Dont worry, Victor is not persuading me to jump ship.... Noone can, it will be my decision if I do so. Right now it's just a thought, nothing final yet. Just needed some drivers opinions if they recommend seeking another company for flatbed training, regarding my situation. We will see how this goes and I will keep you guys posted...

TwoSides... I hope you can get this to work there. You seem smart enough to handle the challenges and avoid unnecessary risks.

Good Luck! 👍

Avoiding unnecessary risks is my main objective. Thank you, I appreciate it G-town

Danny K.'s Comment
member avatar

TwoSides you just can't let yourself get hung up about this like you have so far. I myself had to go to a starter that only runs team because no one else would take me after CDL school because of my past. I hate it but so what, I have to keep my eyes on the prize, and that prize is months if not a year away, not just a few measly days like you've had so far. You just have to ask yourself how it would look to any other company if Knight took you on after TMC sent you home and then two weeks on your own you go calling them up saying how you don't feel safe driving these loads and it's all Knight's fault. All they're going to hear is this guy's not going to be safe driving our loads and why pour our money into him when he's hopping around making excuses. Now that might not be the truth but hell they don't know you from Adam and that's just what they're going to hear. Seek all the help you can from other drivers and on here, they're more than willing to help see you succeed, but you just can't focus on what could've or should've happened, let it all go, it's killing you, man.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
Not to discourage you but why don't you quit trucking and get a job where they tell you everything to do with a boss standing over you? I honest think that's what kind if job you are meant for.

rofl-1.gif Once again with the assumptions. I see what type of person you are... Go troll someone else buddyrofl-3.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I do not agree with Mikey’s assessment either.

double-quotes-start.png

Not to discourage you but why don't you quit trucking and get a job where they tell you everything to do with a boss standing over you? I honest think that's what kind if job you are meant for.

double-quotes-end.png

rofl-1.gif Once again with the assumptions. I see what type of person you are... Go troll someone else buddyrofl-3.gif

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
I do not agree with Mikey’s assessment either.

Nor do i.

TS, you've shown a willingness to work through some adversity simply by taking on the challenge of being a flatbedder, and one with no training at that. More on that in a minute.

There have been more challenges, so let's take stock of where you are:

You had issues with backing a spread axle. With practice, you've gotten better, and will continue to do so. Although different from tandems , it really isn't all that different. At least not so much that it can't be done. So you've moved past that problem.

The payroll thing is likely either a mistake, or an oversight. With a phone call today, you can fix all of that, including the per diem issue. You should have a clearer understanding of your pay going forward. Moving on.

As a former flatbedder, I agree that your training was insufficient. Anyone who thinks your complaints are unwarranted has never had to secure 48,000 lbs of death onto an open deck. However, even this can be overcome by some diligence on your part. As suggested, study up on securement techniques, watch videos, and most importantly ask other flatbedders for assistance when needed. They will be more than happy to help.

You sound like a smart guy, but one that's overwhelmed. Stay the course, you'll figure it out.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Mikey B.'s Comment
member avatar

I may be wrong, maybe I was letting frustration with another poster get in the way.

If I am wrong then prove me to be wrong by overcoming the adversity with your current employer by sticking with them and succeeding. Become a top tier driver.

Your training from them may not be the best but between what you have gotten and all of the tools and people at your disposal you have everything needed to succeed. Id love nothing more than for you to prove me wrong. Do that and ill admit I was wrong about you...and apologize to you.

Thats the best I can do.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

TwoSides, I'm confident I've gathered your contact info, but before I send you mine, please verify these two facts.

Your first name consists of three letters ending with an i, and both your home phone and cell phone numbers end with a zero.

I'm sorry to bother you with this. I just like to be careful on the internet.

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