How To Handle Discrepancy With Pay From Employer

Topic 31325 | Page 4

Page 4 of 7 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
To be perfectly frank, you put yourself into the same group as others so don't make like Laura or anyone else has done that. Nobody means any disrespect to you either but you in fact did exactly what she said. You came on here talking about quitting and going elsewhere over a single check that you don't understand and your feeling that you need more training, all without having discussed it with the appropriate departments. You are defeated and discouraged after a mere 2 weeks and think you know better then your successful employer to the point of suggesting no other new drivers go there because they don't know what they're doing and won't train them properly. Or am I missing something here?

Mikey you are missing something because you are making a lot of assumptions and don't know whats going on with me at Knight. You automatically took Knights side without having any proof of if what I was saying is true or not. True, I did overreact with my pay but I haven't acted on it yet, I came here for advice. The only department I haven't spoken to yet is with payroll because it's the weekend. I have spoken to my TM, sent an email to the safety department and reached out to headquarters about my training issues. My TM told me to talk to my DM and I haven't heard from safety or headquarters yet.

I could tell after one day that Knights flatbed training is insufficient. But you, Laura and some others say differently without knowing anything about it. You think I'm wrong because Knight is a successful company and I'm just some rookie driver that knows nothing. Robert B said above

It’s true that Knight doesn’t have the best training program for open deck but In regards to companies who train and do open deck work, they’re the exception. If TwoSides wants to lessen open deck work, he needs to go with a company with an established training program.

I don't need to be an experienced driver to know when I'm not being trained properly and might need to seek another company for flatbed, "I have a brain and 2 eyes"....... Also this is from Old School, someone who is a flatbed driver for Knight...

I've told you before that I think Knight's flatbed training is insufficient

You put me into that group without gathering all information first. You acted towards me like I was another rookie same as the others that complain and take shots at my company, that's not the case here. I might be a rookie driver but I'm not a dumb individual....

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
I'm assuming that flatbed works the same as our other divisions. Your first solo 30k miles are technically squire miles. I think they were at lower rate as well. I could be wrong about the rate. I'd have to go back and look.

Hey Davy, yea I would assume the same if I were still in training. Apparently I'm a full time Knight driving associate

I'm surprised that you were shifted to flatbed directly after training, as the procedure knight listed was 30k solo training miles OTR. And then upon completion, you become a full knight driving associate. I thought I ran over this somewhere in my diary, but the full training procedure is:

Squire school 3 weeks

Top gun or OTR training with trainer, 3 to 4 weeks.

30k solo OTR miles under guidance of DDM.

Again, not bashing Knight, but my terminal did not follow those guidelines. I did not attend the squire school which I'm assuming is the training for your CDL , I obtained my CDL through a private school. I went out for OTR training but I'm not under guidance of my DDM for 30k solo miles.

There's a really good thread on here about per diem. I chose not to for my own strategy this year. I'd hit the search function on it.

Thanks, I have looked it up. I don't remember signing up for per diem , thats probably why my cpm is so low....

I'm very slow and conservative in my choices. In watching the struggles you have been enduring with going directly to flatbed has reafirmed my slow approach and why I want at least a year of dry van before I tackle something else.

That's smart, also might want to wait until Knight gets better with their flatbed division. Not sure what's going on with other terminals but my terminal doesn't have any flatbed trainers, that is why they had me do my OTR training in dry van. I also sent an email to safety recommending they not hire inexperienced drivers for flatbed work. Maybe they should build the division with experienced flatbed drivers first then take on new drivers after they get more established in that area

Im wondering if you might want to perhaps talk to your DDM and or TM about doing your 30k solo miles in dry van?

Will do. First thing Monday I will again express my concerns to my DM

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

I am guessing, but I think your pay rate is probably somewhere in the 42 to 44 cents per mile.

You will be more confident in your pay if you understand your check stub. When you speak to payroll just tell them you don't want to be on per diem. The company automatically puts you on it because it saves them money, but it is your choice. Payroll will take care of it right away if you make the request. That will simplify your pay stub, and you will be able to see your actual pay rate on your stub.

You will also be more confident in your job if you have more understanding of load securement. Here's a conversation about load securement. Take a look at it and see if it helps you start to understand some of the things you need to know. Securing a flatbed load.

We also have our own course on load securement here on our website. Work your way through it. You will learn a lot. There is way more in there than you need for this account you are on, but you still will enjoy your new confidence after you know what you are doing. Flatbed Load Securement. If you are serious about wanting to understand this part of trucking, you will apply yourself to this course of study.

I am fully aware of the problems there at Carlisle. I hope you can stick it out and find, as I have, that this account is a great way to make some really good money. Do you guys have a dedicated dispatcher for this account? Do they have Trey doing it right now? I know you are frustrated. I understand it completely. Hang in there and see if you can learn some of this on your own. You actually have a great opportunity before you. I hope you can make it work.

If there is anyway I can help, please let me know. I will do whatever I can to help out.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

If you are going to switch companies, I am speaking from an ongoing experience, GO WITH MELTON TRUCK LINES! They are the hot stuff in my opinion!

double-quotes-start.png

To be perfectly frank, you put yourself into the same group as others so don't make like Laura or anyone else has done that. Nobody means any disrespect to you either but you in fact did exactly what she said. You came on here talking about quitting and going elsewhere over a single check that you don't understand and your feeling that you need more training, all without having discussed it with the appropriate departments. You are defeated and discouraged after a mere 2 weeks and think you know better then your successful employer to the point of suggesting no other new drivers go there because they don't know what they're doing and won't train them properly. Or am I missing something here?

double-quotes-end.png

Mikey you are missing something because you are making a lot of assumptions and don't know whats going on with me at Knight. You automatically took Knights side without having any proof of if what I was saying is true or not. True, I did overreact with my pay but I haven't acted on it yet, I came here for advice. The only department I haven't spoken to yet is with payroll because it's the weekend. I have spoken to my TM, sent an email to the safety department and reached out to headquarters about my training issues. My TM told me to talk to my DM and I haven't heard from safety or headquarters yet.

I could tell after one day that Knights flatbed training is insufficient. But you, Laura and some others say differently without knowing anything about it. You think I'm wrong because Knight is a successful company and I'm just some rookie driver that knows nothing. Robert B said above

double-quotes-start.png

It’s true that Knight doesn’t have the best training program for open deck but In regards to companies who train and do open deck work, they’re the exception. If TwoSides wants to lessen open deck work, he needs to go with a company with an established training program.

double-quotes-end.png

I don't need to be an experienced driver to know when I'm not being trained properly and might need to seek another company for flatbed, "I have a brain and 2 eyes"....... Also this is from Old School, someone who is a flatbed driver for Knight...

double-quotes-start.png

I've told you before that I think Knight's flatbed training is insufficient

double-quotes-end.png

You put me into that group without gathering all information first. You acted towards me like I was another rookie same as the others that complain and take shots at my company, that's not the case here. I might be a rookie driver but I'm not a dumb individual....

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Okay that's enough. Just about read all we're going to from you.

Great that you think Melton is the greatest company ever, but not after reading all the bashing of Western Express. Then you jump onto another thread concerning Knight recruiting for Melton?

Nope!

Give it a rest as you were already told.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Packrat, I am saying only about Melton on this thread so I am not sure where you drew up something about Western from that comment. Also I am saying things from my perspective and experience that none but me experienced and Anne is my witness on that one. But I left off "bashing" if saying my experience is "bashing." Some of you keep posting comments so I respond. And anyways I took Gtowns advice. I made a whole comment that was only about Melton in my original thread about them. Seems to me you and the other commentors are just stuck on trying to delegitimize my experience with them. Anyhow, I am going to focus on talking good about the company that really had great training and support too let alone their equipment is emaculate. Good day.

Okay that's enough. Just about read all we're going to from you.

Great that you think Melton is the greatest company ever, but not after reading all the bashing of Western Express. Then you jump onto another thread concerning Knight recruiting for Melton?

Nope!

Give it a rest as you were already told.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Thank you Old School. I am definitely going to try and make this work. I hope it does, Knight does seem to be a good company, my only problem with the terminal is the lack of communication, not only with me but within the terminal itself. I also think they are too laid back. I pointed that out to Melissa when I was in orientation and she thinks that is a problem. But you are aware of my terminal, so you do know.

Load securement is a major concern right now. The loads at Cressona seem easy, it's when I get other loads like the one I'm on now that will scare me senseless. I understand tarping and I will get better with time. Thank you so much for those links. I will definitely study them every night when I shut down.

Yes there is a dedicated dispatcher , it's Shawn. Trae is the operation manager bit fills in when Shawn is out. It looks like I'm going to be in Cressona a lot. Not as bad as some ppl hinted. It's indoors so I have noooo complaints about that. Better to be strapping and tarping there than outside in 17 degree weather....

Do you really think I should learn this on my own? If it were only Cressona loads I think it wouldn't be as bad. I have no idea about other loads, like the 8 rows of aluminum sows and where to place it on my trailer. I am thinking maybe I should go to another company if they don't keep their promise of me following a driver for a week. Then coming back to Knight after a year with another flatbed company??

As for the per diem , I don't see why I would need that?? I read up on it, still a little confused on it because I never heard of it before. What do you think? And anyone else that is on per diem what is the benefit of it??

Old School you have been a big help to me so far along with Chief Brody, Robert B and Pianoman. Thank you for reaching out to help. The only thing I can think of is follow my diary when you have a chance and tell me what I'm doing wrong and offer advice like you have been. Also I think Anne has your number?, is it okay for her to give it to me?

Thanks again and stay safe!

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar
If you are going to switch companies, I am speaking from an ongoing experience, GO WITH MELTON TRUCK LINES! They are the hot stuff in my opinion!

Thanks Victor. I have seen them out on the road a lot.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Victor... IMO this is not the time to encourage TwoSides to jump ship.

I honestly hope he can work it out at Knight. First group through new training can make a positive impact on their company’s future, becoming part of the solution and not exacerbating the problem. TwoSides is smart enough to get through this and likely benefit greatly as a result.

If you are going to switch companies, I am speaking from an ongoing experience, GO WITH MELTON TRUCK LINES! They are the hot stuff in my opinion!

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

To be perfectly frank, you put yourself into the same group as others so don't make like Laura or anyone else has done that. Nobody means any disrespect to you either but you in fact did exactly what she said. You came on here talking about quitting and going elsewhere over a single check that you don't understand and your feeling that you need more training, all without having discussed it with the appropriate departments. You are defeated and discouraged after a mere 2 weeks and think you know better then your successful employer to the point of suggesting no other new drivers go there because they don't know what they're doing and won't train them properly. Or am I missing something here?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Mikey you are missing something because you are making a lot of assumptions and don't know whats going on with me at Knight. You automatically took Knights side without having any proof of if what I was saying is true or not. True, I did overreact with my pay but I haven't acted on it yet, I came here for advice. The only department I haven't spoken to yet is with payroll because it's the weekend. I have spoken to my TM, sent an email to the safety department and reached out to headquarters about my training issues. My TM told me to talk to my DM and I haven't heard from safety or headquarters yet.

I could tell after one day that Knights flatbed training is insufficient. But you, Laura and some others say differently without knowing anything about it. You think I'm wrong because Knight is a successful company and I'm just some rookie driver that knows nothing. Robert B said above

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

It’s true that Knight doesn’t have the best training program for open deck but In regards to companies who train and do open deck work, they’re the exception. If TwoSides wants to lessen open deck work, he needs to go with a company with an established training program.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I don't need to be an experienced driver to know when I'm not being trained properly and might need to seek another company for flatbed, "I have a brain and 2 eyes"....... Also this is from Old School, someone who is a flatbed driver for Knight...

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I've told you before that I think Knight's flatbed training is insufficient

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You put me into that group without gathering all information first. You acted towards me like I was another rookie same as the others that complain and take shots at my company, that's not the case here. I might be a rookie driver but I'm not a dumb individual....

double-quotes-end.png

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Do you really think I should learn this on my own? If it were only Cressona loads I think it wouldn't be as bad. I have no idea about other loads, like the 8 rows of aluminum sows and where to place it on my trailer. I am thinking maybe I should go to another company if they don't keep their promise of me following a driver for a week. Then coming back to Knight after a year with another flatbed company??

That decision is completely yours. My knowledge of trucking tells me that you will be disappointed with your training wherever you go. There is no way to cover every single kind of flatbed load during a week's worth of training. I don't know of any companies who spend more than four or five days on securement training. All of them expect you to take the bull by the horns and learn how it works by getting out there and doing different types of loads. What you need is the basics. You need to understand about WLLs (Working Load Limits) and anchor points. The rest is learned out here on the job. Remember, you can always ask other drivers for some help. That is how I learned this stuff. I applied myself to my own studies of it and sought help when needed.

As for the per diem , I don't see why I would need that?? I read up on it, still a little confused on it because I never heard of it before. What do you think?

My opinion is that per diem does nothing beneficial for a company driver. Under our current tax laws you get no benefit from it. Some drivers claim it is tax free money, but it really isn't. I have 30 years of accounting and business experience. I do not take per diem pay and I see no reason for you to be on it unless you just want to be generous to your employer who will be glad to reap the benefits of you being on it. They are the only one getting anything out of it. Please people don't start a discussion here about how you think per diem is a good thing. I know what I am talking about, and am just trying to help this new driver out with some information.

Also I think Anne has your number?, is it okay for her to give it to me?

Anne knows not to give out that information. I will send you my contact info. Give me a day or so and I will get it to you.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 4 of 7 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Knight Transport Dealing With The Boss First Solo Months On The Road Flatbed Per Diem Pay Truck Driver Salary Truck Drivers Tax Questions
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More