Flatbed Securement Discussion 2022

Topic 31351 | Page 1

Page 1 of 11 Next Page Go To Page:
Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

Rather than continue to hijack Twosides's diary, I am starting this thread for him, or other rookie flatbed drivers, to ask questions about securement and for myself, and other experienced flatbed drivers to offer advice.

Hopefully, Twosides will have gotten someone at Knight to provide direct training, which is a lot better, but even with that this thread should be helpful.

Below is my latest load of Caterpillar lower powertrain units.

0075619001642079959.jpg

This is an example of how to use the excess strap as edge protection.

0785899001642080071.jpg

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Fantastic idea with a great way to spread knowledge. This is what Brett had in mind when he started the site.

TwoSides11's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for this thread Chief. I hope all the flatbed drivers on this site will contribute on this thread.

As for your picture you just tighten the excess strap in between the strap and wood correct? Also meant to ask you , do you have winches on both sides of your trailer ?I kinda get the hint that you do. You put your stake pocket winches on the opposite side of the other winches for your loads? So for a load you have winches on both sides of the trailer correct?

Also how do you figure out how many straps to use on a load? I can't zoom in on your picture but it looks like you have 3 straps on the front powertrain unit. The way I do it is divide the weight of the load by 5 then 2 extra ones. I divide by 5 because the load straps are 5400lbs WLL, I round off.... The 2 extra straps are from I think Pianoman saying 1 more for your wife and 1 more for your kid.

The load I'm on now was 34,416lb. I used 9 straps for it. I had 4 stops, delivered to 3 of them and the remaining load is 8,174, or it should be according to the paperwork. I have 6 straps on that. 2 on the front, middle and back. I know that's overkill for that weight but I know for sure it's not going anywhere. It is also placed directly in the center of the trailer towards the front. I wanted to ask the forklift operator at the last stop if he could move it more towards the middle so it wouldn't be in the front. But I didn't. Any thoughts on the placement of the remaining load I have?

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
As for your picture you just tighten the excess strap in between the strap and wood correct?

Yup. It keeps the excess strap secure.

do you have winches on both sides of your trailer ?

Yes, Prime trailers have winches on both sides, giving you the ability to alternate the direction you pull your straps.

You put your stake pocket winches on the opposite side of the other winches for your loads? So for a load you have winches on both sides of the trailer correct?

You can put stake or portable winches wherever you want. In particular I liked to use them over the tires, which is somewhere you should never have a standard rail winch.

Some would consider your strap count a little overkill. But you can't put a price on the piece of mind of knowing your load is secure. I always shot for 100% securement as opposed to the required 50%. Meaning if a load weight 40,000 lbs, I'd have at least eight straps on it, and always an extra strap in the front and rear.

Also there are some loads that, although lightweight, require more straps simply due to the size and shape of the product. For example I once had an irrigation system (those long ones that spin around in a circle in a field) that weighed somewhere in the area of 20k-25k, but I had a record 26 straps on that load because of the pieces and parts scattered everywhere on my deck.

Overkill is good. The alternative is not.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Oh yeah. As to your load placement question, I wouldn't bother moving it to go to the third stop. Something that light isn't going to make that much of a difference anyway. No need to create that unnecessary step, not to mention the liability the forklift operator would take on by touching someone else's freight.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

I have a question. How would you all secure this load, on your own? Would you have done more bulk heads or side guards?

0962673001642126532.jpg

0475050001642126600.jpg

We did two belly wraps one in the front and rear of the load. 13 straps in total all rated at 4,000 lbs which this load weighs in at 43 or 45000 lbs so we way oversecured it but I know that you all have good ideas so I am looking forward to your ideas!

Also on a sidenote to moderators, can you take me off moderation lol, it would be nice for like updates on my diary and such.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

The bulkhead looks a little too tall for me. The higher you go, the weaker it becomes. I'd prefer to have the boards side by side, three tiers high.

Also, I'd have a belly strap front and rear on the bottom tier of pipe. Not required, but quick and easy.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

The only thing that I add in that situation is to add 2 X chains across the front of the bulkhead. I don't actually use a binder to secure them. I just bungee the slack. The purpose is in case the load shifts forward I have two extra chains across the front that will catch the dunnage.

0861705001642167128.jpg

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for your imput will do that, my trainer says the reason we went that high was because we did not have enough boards to do 3 tiers high with them side by side.

Brody thats a grand idea thats something I will remember to do by myself although I have not gotten there yet. Nervous about doing chains on my own, mostly with coils cause I am not sure how to keep them up the bulk head when I am chaining. Any ideas?

The bulkhead looks a little too tall for me. The higher you go, the weaker it becomes. I'd prefer to have the boards side by side, three tiers high.

Also, I'd have a belly strap front and rear on the bottom tier of pipe. Not required, but quick and easy.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

0760120001642210979.jpg

Victor. As a guy who has hauled coils, many of them and very heavy (those two were 84k combined), I can tell you that you’re not going to use a bulkhead. Chaining coils is all about doing it properly and consistently and respecting that load for the potential hazards it poses. A bulkhead made of a few 4x4’s isn’t going to stop a coil if it gets loose, not much will.

Bulkhead:

A strong wall-like structure placed at the front of a flatbed trailer (or on the rear of the tractor) used to protect the driver against shifting cargo during a front-end collision. May also refer to any separator within a dry or liquid trailer (also called a baffle for liquid trailers) used to partition the load.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 11 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Flatbed Load Securement Photos Trailers Trip Planning Truck Driver Safety Truck Driver Training
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More