Cold Weather Shopping List

Topic 31368 | Page 1

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Travis's Comment
member avatar

Coming from the desert near Yuma I don't own any super cold weather clothes. I've hiked the Appalachians before and have a reasonable idea of what to buy for that. Would the same principles apply for trucking? A quick dry layer of draws, short/long pants, quick dry shirt and then maybe wool to pull on then jacket and gloves, beanie cap etc

Any particular brands, exact items y'all love? I hate cotton, love polyester for base layers and love wool..For the outer jacket...no clue as it's never been cold enough to need one.

Items I've no clue on are gloves, scarves, boots, beanies... basically the accessories.

I don't wanna be at school freezing or even worse in North Dakota solo and have to chain while undergeared

BK's Comment
member avatar

You’re overthinking this. Everything I wear for cold weather came from Walmart. Sweat pants, regular pants over the sweat, socks and oil resistant shoes. Up top, tee shirt, sweater and then a hooded sweat shirt, stocking cap and cheap work gloves. With few exceptions I’m not out of the truck that much even though I run mostly cold weather routes.

Bird-One's Comment
member avatar

I don’t think you are overthinking this at all. I drive local in Chicago and hate the cold. Spent serious money on warming layers. I have all Carhartt gear. Multiple base layers, thermals, long underwear, a hoodie, a vest, and a thick Carhartt hat. Sure it takes me 15 minutes to get dressed but I am warm. A mix of polyester and wool. I spent money on a pair of timberland pro waterproof, steel toe boots. They have thinsulate in em so I have never had an issue with cold feet. It helps I have a Carhartt outlet near me house.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I agree your overthinking it. I wear jeans and a t-shirt in the truck. I have a few different long sleeve shirts I wear and I have my generic carhart jacket for when it gets real cold. I really don't worry about layers at all, because we don't really have to spend a lot of time outside the truck.

For gloves I have 2 pairs. I have the cheap leather ones from harbor freight, and when it's below 0 I have some cotton ones I wear under it.

I have a pair of steel toe boots and a pair of tennis shoes. If it's snowy, cold and wet out ill wear the boots otherwise the shoes are good enough to get me across the parking lot.

Nuts's Comment
member avatar

I am here learning about the profession and don't drive a big rig, but I do live in North Dakota so understanding about the cold is not something new. If your going the route of a flat bedder you will be outside your truck more to secure the load and would need the gear more. If your just doing drop and hooks not so much like the others mentioned. Your space on the truck will be limited but what if you break down and have no engine to keep you warm in the middle of Montana? It would sure be nice to have some clothes that can save your life. Then in the summer take them off the truck and free up the space. I like having a 2 piece setup in addition to the layers. What I mean is a set of insulated bib overalls and matching jacket. I have been driving a tow truck part time and just being able to take the jacket off and leave the bibs on helps you stay cooler in the truck. Keep in mind that if your out securing a load on a flat bed if that is the route you choose the exercise will also keep you warm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Andrey's Comment
member avatar

It all depends on the amount of time spent outside of your truck. I pull a dry van and normally get out only for a few minutes, so oftentimes I do it in the same tshirt, shorts and flip-flops that I wear all day. Fueling is different, I have a jacket and tennis shoes for that. And yes, I drive in NE, my shop is in Chicago.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
BK's Comment
member avatar

The Norwegians say that there is no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing.

If your truck breaks down in cold weather, you probably still have the bunk heater/ APU to keep you warm

Nevertheless, I carry a sleeping bag with me that’s rated to 30 degrees below zero just in case.

I buy my underwear from a company in Australia called “Down Under Wear” lol

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Anne A. (and sometimes To's Comment
member avatar

The Norwegians say that there is no such thing as bad weather, just bad clothing.

If your truck breaks down in cold weather, you probably still have the bunk heater/ APU to keep you warm

Nevertheless, I carry a sleeping bag with me that’s rated to 30 degrees below zero just in case.

I buy my underwear from a company in Australia called “Down Under Wear” lol

I wish I could .. HOLD ON.. I CAN!

rofl-3.gif sorry.gif rofl-3.gif

Re: Sleeping bag; it's in the DAY CAB. Small 'down' pillow wrapped into it. Yep, Coleman... rides in a day cab. One never knows.

Re: The BEST male skivvies?!?!? Brett agrees on this one... Tommy John's. (NOT Jimmy John's!!, haha! )

If 'momma' can spend $36 on 'underlings' .. 'daddy' can too, for comfort. I got these (only 3) for Christmas, on Brett's recommendation. Man's got happy parts! LoLoL.

Bruce K., hilarious~!!!! Down UNDERS! Love it!

Point being, if a female can spend upward of big bucks on a brassiere to stay comfy (KEARSEY / RAINY .. HELP!!!! WHERE ARE YA?) why cannot a MAN for comfort, too?

Not built like Rainy, at all. Still, comfort & wicking .... importante' !!

~ Anne & Tom ~

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

IDMtnGal 's Comment
member avatar

I wish I could .. HOLD ON.. I CAN!

If 'momma' can spend $36 on 'underlings' .. 'daddy' can too, for comfort. I got these (only 3) for Christmas, on Brett's recommendation. Man's got happy parts! LoLoL.

Point being, if a female can spend upward of big bucks on a brassiere to stay comfy (KEARSEY / RAINY .. HELP!!!! WHERE ARE YA?) why cannot a MAN for comfort, too?

Not built like Rainy, at all. Still, comfort & amp; .... importante' !!

~ Anne & Tom ~

Well Anne,

I have been big pretty much all my life and never spent very much on my bras. Then I went to a specialty store looking for something entirely different and got approached by a sales lady. She asked me if I liked my bras...Nope! VERY uncomfortable! So she had me try on different sizes and styles. I was in my fifties and learned that I was wearing the wrong size. So I got the correct size and the style I like and you're right, we end up spending a bit more. I think mine now run about $30 or $35. But it's worth having the ladies comfortable 😁

Laura

Chief Brody's Comment
member avatar

It depends on what division you will drive. I drive flatbed so I'm active when I'm outside. So it will be similar to what you would buy for hiking in cold weather. Once you get moving your body heats up and then you're going to be sweating.

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